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 Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG

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PostSubject: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Fri Feb 06, 2009 11:22 pm

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9 February 1838 – 2 December 1919) was a British Field Marshal and a recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Wood served as a midshipman in the Crimean War during the siege of Sebastopol. Seriously wounded in an attack on the Redan, Wood was mentioned in dispatches. He then left the Royal Navy to join the British Army, becoming a cornet in the 13th Light Dragoons and then a lieutenant in the 17th Lancers. In India, he saw action at Rajghur, Sindwaho, Kharee, and Barode during the Indian Mutiny.
On 19 October 1858 during an action at Sinwaho, twenty-year-old Lieutenant Wood of the 17h Lancers was in command of a troop of light cavalry, and attacked almost single-handed a body of rebels, whom he routed. At Sindhora, with the help of a daffadar and a sowar, he rescued a local merchant from a band of robbers who had taken their captive into the jungle, where they intended to hang him. For this, Wood was awarded the Victoria Cross
In 1861, Wood was promoted to captain and in 1862, he became a brevet major in the 73rd Highlanders ([73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot]). In 1865, he left the infantry for the cavalry again. After a stint as an aide-de-camp in Dublin, Wood was given a staff position until 1871, when he became a full major in the 90th Foot. In 1867, he married Mary Pauline Southwell, the sister of the 4th Viscount Southwell.
In 1873, Wood was promoted brevet lieutenant-colonel and in 1874, he served in the Ashanti War. Until 1878, Wood was a member of the staff at Aldershot.
In January 1879, he took part in the Anglo-Zulu War and was given command of the left column of the army that crossed the Zulu frontier, and shortly afterwards he received the local rank of brigadier ¬general. Defeated at Hlobane, he recovered and decisively beat the Zulus at Kambula and also took part in the final battle at Ulundi.
At the close of the war, Evelyn Wood became a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath and was appointed to command the Chatham district. With the First Boer War going on, Wood was sent back to South Africa in January 1881 with the local rank of major¬ general. He remained in Natal until February 1882, was awarded the Order of St Michael and St George and then returned to the Chatham command.
Wood was given command of a brigade in the Egyptian expedition. He was made Sirdar of the Egyptian army until 1885, during which period he thoroughly reorganized it. He commanded the British at the Battle of Gennis. In 1886, he was allowed to return to Britain, promoted to lieutenant-general in 1891, Wood was given the Grand Cross in the Order of the Bath. He saw further service as quartermaster-general at the War Office and as adjutant-general.
Promoted to full general in 1895, Wood commanded the II Army Corps and Southern Command from 1901 to 1904. On 8 April 1903, Sir Evelyn Wood was promoted field marshal. That same year, he was also awarded the freedom of the Borough of Chelmsford. In 1907, he became colonel of the Royal Horse Guards. He was also a governor of Gresham's School from 1899 to 1919.
After retiring from active service, Sir Evelyn Wood VC became chairman of the Association for the City of London, and on 11 March 1911 he was appointed Constable of the Tower of London. In 1913 Wood was made a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (GCB).
Wood was buried with full military honours in the Military Cemetery at Aldershot in Hampshire. His Victoria Cross is displayed at the National Army Museum (Chelsea, England).

1London Gazette: no. 22419, p. 3257, 1860-09-04. Retrieved on 2008-04-13.
2 Martin J. Hadwen. "Henry Evelyn Wood". Military History magazine, April 1994 (reprinted on historynet.com)
3London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 28749, p. 6075, 1913-08-22. Retrieved on 2008-04-13.
•Monuments to Courage (David Harvey, 1999)
•The Register of the Victoria Cross (This England, 1997)
•One Hundred Terms at Gresham's School by J.R. Eccles (1934

See Pictorial catalogue of AZW graves


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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:02 am

"Henry Evelyn Wood only served in the 13th Light Dragoons for 2 years, from September 1855 to October 1857. It was his first Army unit, having been a Midshipman in the Navy and a naval cadet before that. It was as a 16 year old Midshipman that he had his first experience of war. He was part of a 1400-man Naval Brigade sent to the Crimea in 1854. He manned 68 and 32 pounder guns positioned on a ridge facing Sebastopol, coming under fire himself. He wrote home that he was nervous at first but after a week, 'was conscious of a decided feeling of exultation in the presence of danger'. Wood was recommended for a VC but did not receive it at this time. To add injury to insult, he was severely wounded by case shot just below the elbow. The doctors wanted to amputate but he refused to let them and he was invalided home. Wood was a passionate hunter and it is perhaps, for this reason that he decided to join the cavalry. When he reported to the 13th Light Dragoons at their depot in Dorchester he still had his arm in a sling. He did not gamble, smoke, or drink but had to pay his full share of the mess costs. Most officers at the time had a private income in excess of £400, Wood's father, a clergyman, could only afford to give him £250.

At the end of 1855 wood was ordered to the Crimea. He arrived at Scutari on 22 January 1856 and found himself in hospital with pneumonia and typhoid fever within a month. His parents were notified that he was terminally ill. Although a soldier servant and two female nurses, his treatment, at times attended him, was brutal. He had become so emaciated that the bones of both hips had come through the skin, and one of Miss Nightingale's nurses, instead of wetting the lint before changing it, simply ripped it off, tearing away the flesh and drawing blood. His mother, Lady Wood, arrived at Scutari on 20th March and went to his bedside to find a nurse striking her son as he lay in his bed. She was a woman of exceptional vitality and determination and flew into a fury at the nurse. Evelyn was shipped home against all the doctors' advice and began to improve before reaching England.

An uncle paid for his promotion to Lieutenant and he returned to the 13th at the end of 1856 while they were in Ireland. When the Indian Mutiny broke out, Wood joined the 17th Lancers, as he was keen to see some action. He proved his bravery many times over, winning the VC in 1859 after rescuing a rich landowner from a large band of robbers in a Sironj jungle.
He saw action in the Ashanti War of 1873-4, the Zulu War of 1879 and the Egyptian expeditions. He was responsible for the peace negotiations at the end of the first Boer War in 1881, a task he carried out with his hands tied (so to speak) and which made him very unpopular. Wolseley referred to the treaty, as ignominious and thought Wood should have resigned his commission. But he was in favour with the politicians and with the Queen. The ordinary soldier had much reason to thank Evelyn Wood. In his position as Quartermaster-General (1893) and later Adjutant-General (1895) he brought about many changes that improved the quality of life for the soldiers of the British Army, especially the medical facilities and sanitary arrangements. He reached the rank of Field Marshal in April 1903 and effectively retired in December 1904. Sir H. Evelyn Wood VC GCB GCMG died peacefully in Essex at the age of 81."


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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:34 pm

Henry Evelyn Wood began his military career in the Royal Navy, but his ultimate fame would rest upon his land-based exploits against the Zulu warriors of southeast Africa. Less well known was the battle he fought against ill health and general frailty all his life. Against all, he was just about indomitable.
Henry Evelyn Wood was born at Cressing, near Braintree, England, in 1838, the youngest son of a vicar. Unhappy with what he regarded as unfair discipline at school, he left for the Royal Navy shortly after his 14th birthday and within two years had earned the white badge of a midshipman.

In October 1854, the year and the month of the Crimean War's famous Charge of the Light Brigade, Wood went ashore to serve as a member of the British naval brigade in that same war. For the next nine months he worked and fought, subsisting chiefly on a diet of rotten biscuit, raw salt pork, and rum. When the British mounted their assault against the Russian defensive position known as the Redan in June 1885, Wood had been confined to bed for two weeks with dysentery and fever. It was the first of many illnesses he was to suffer throughout his career, and between genuine bouts of sickness he also had a continual list of imaginary complaints. Nevertheless, he rose from his sickbed to take his place in the assault column. Wood was so weak that another sailor assisted him during the assault, and when they reached the Russian embankment under heavy fire, Wood and his comrade had to struggle with a scaling ladder meant to be carried by eight fully fit men. The sailor was shot and killed, and Wood was shot through the elbow. Still under fire, he crawled back to camp and argued a surgeon out of amputating his arm before he collapsed. A year later, using a pocketknife and a mirror, he removed eight bone splinters from the same wound, which had not healed properly.Invalided home, he later was offered a commission in the army. He joined the 13th Light Dragoons, then in Ireland for training. In January 1856, Wood was on his way back to the Crimea. In February, at Scutari, he contracted both typhoid and pneumonia and was hospitalised. His mother arrived to take over his nursing, having been told that he had not long to live. By April 15, 1857, he had recovered sufficiently to return to England.

By the end of the year, despite all his health problems, Wood had rejoined his regiment in Ireland. He longed for action, and finding life in the cavalry much more expensive than he had anticipated, he was considering joining the Foreign Legion in Algeria when news of a mutiny in India reached him. He joined the 17th Lancers as they embarked for India.Wood spent 1858 with a column charged with mopping up the large bands of mutineers still roaming the Indian countryside. In between forays he was confined to his bed with fever, sunstroke and exhaustion. Always ready for a challenge, he made a bet with a nabob that he could ride a giraffe. All went well at first, but finally Wood was thrown, and the giraffe's knee hit him in the chest. The animal's hind foot then caught him in the face. This knocked him insensible, cut a hole in both cheeks and his lip, and mashed his nose. For the next three days, Wood had to accompany his troop in a stretcher.Still only 20, Wood raised an irregular cavalry regiment with the lancers and then, in an action in which his party was greatly outnumbered, won the Victoria Cross for rescuing a local merchant.

In 1860, after many other actions, Wood returned to England. He hoped to enter the Staff College but found that it was not possible, since an officer of the 17th Lancers was already there, and the regulations of the day permitted only one officer per regiment. But Wood arranged to transfer into the 73rd Perthshire and then was allowed to enter after all. He completed and passed the course at the Staff College and for the next few years held various positions in the army. Meanwhile, he qualified as a barrister, in case he needed something to fall back on. During that time he met his future wife, Pauline Southwell. Before the wedding, Wood made her swear that she would never stand in the way of his taking active service. She never did.

In 1871 Wood joined a new battalion, the 90th Light Infantry, as a junior major in command of three companies at Stirling Castle, Scotland. In January 1873 he was promoted to brevet lieutenant colonel, and at the end of that month Sir Garnet Wolseley requested him on'special service' for the Ashanti campaign in West Africa (Ghana today).Wood soon had raised a regiment from the local friendly tribes. Between skirmishes he and his men helped to drive a track inland through jungle and swamp. Exhaustion and illness again laid him low, but still he carried on. On January 31, 1874, Wood was at the head of his column helping to clear track when they were attacked. An Ashanti who had been lying under cover nearby shot the head of a nail into Wood's chest right over his heart. He was taken to a makeshift hospital and examined by the principal medical officer of the expedition, who quickly summoned Wolseley. The doctor told Wolseley to say his farewells to Wood, since he 'never yet saw a man live with a shot in his pericardium.'

Three days later, Wood received a note lamenting his absence and the fact that his regiment would not now be present at the fall of Kumasi, the Ashanti capital. Despite protests from the doctor, Wood discharged himself from the hospital. After a delay of some five hours he and three others marched through the night — in pouring rain — until they reached the regiment at 4 a.m. the next day. Wood then took command of the lead section of the advanced guard for the action that followed.
After the successful conclusion of the campaign, during which he had been mentioned in dispatches five times, Wood returned to England and again held a succession of administrative posts.

In January 1878 Wood followed his battalion to South Africa, where there was trouble with the so-called Gaika people. The fighting finished on May 29.
Throughout November and December, preparations were being made to disarm the restive Zulus. War obviously was coming. On January 6, 1879, Evelyn Wood led No. 4 Column, consisting of the 13th and 90th Light infantries, four artillery pieces and a varying number of horsemen, across the Blood River into Zululand.
At 9 a.m. on January 11, Wood met with his commander, General Frederic Thesiger, Earl of Chelmsford, on the Nkonjane Hill, some nine miles from Rorke's Drift. In a three-hour meeting, he warned Chelmsford that his spies had told him the first serious Zulu attack would fall on the column that Chelmsford was leading. On January 24, in the middle of an action against a small Zulu force, Wood received a note telling him of Chelmsford's disaster at Isandhlwana. On January 22, a Zulu force had overrun the camp of No. 3 Column and left more than 1,000 officers and men of other ranks dead. Wood received a further note some days later from Lord Chelmsford, confirming the news and advising him that he now had a free hand to go anywhere in Zululand, but also warning that he could shortly expect to have the whole Zulu army on his hands. Wood replied on January 31 that he had taken up station on Khambula Hill, a site that he thought he could hold against attack.

Hearing on March 27 that a large force of Zulus was on the nearby Hlobane Mountain, Wood sent out a strong force for an attack of his own on March 28. A violent action was fought on that day on the slopes of the mountain, and in the early stages of the action two of Wood's friends were killed and his own horse was shot dead under him. As Wood tried to have the bodies of his friends hoisted up onto baggage animals, his party came under heavy fire and most of the ponies were killed. Finally, a bugler, whom Wood described as one of the bravest men in the army, managed to get the bodies onto a pony. Wood recalled that he had a prayer book in the wallets of the saddle under his dead horse. He asked the bugler to retrieve it, though not to take any unnecessary risks in doing so, a feat that the bugler accomplished in an apparently leisurely fashion while still under fire.

They then moved some 300 yards back down the mountain in an attempt to find some open soil, but digging the grave in the hard ground was a laborious task. The British had reached a depth of only four feet when they were alarmed to see a party of 300 Zulus coming to attack. The bodies were quickly lowered into the grave, but to Wood's consternation the cavity was not long enough. Despite the fact that they were under fire again, he had the bodies removed and the grave lengthened. When the burial was completed to his satisfaction, he read the burial service from the prayer book.His party was then assisted by Colonel Redvers Buller's cavalrymen, who had seen Wood's predicament and directed their fire at the Zulus, checking their approach. With scores of Buller's men cut off and killed on Hlobane, Wood withdrew his force from the mountain and retired to Khambula Hill to await the real onslaught. On March 29, 1879, some 23,000 warriors assembled for an attack.

Wood called in the troops that had been sent out of the laager to cut wood. He then made sure his men had a hasty dinner, secure in the knowledge that his troops could be in position in the laager within 70 seconds of the 'alert' signal.
At 1:30 p.m., Buller led his horsemen out and harried the Zulu right horn (one of two flanking forces in the standard Zulu attack formation), goading the enemy into a premature attack. His action is considered a partial cause of their eventual failure to overrun the camp. Had the three Zulu sections made a concerted attack, the result might well have been different.

During the action, Wood shot three leaders of the iNgobamakhosi Zulu Regiment with five rounds, then coolly advised the soldier from whom he had borrowed the rifle that the sights were set some 60 yards high. The Zulus pressed home their attack and at one stage held covered ground in a small ravine near the British laager, from which point their rifle fire was causing serious casualties among Wood's command. A bayonet charge led by Major Robert Hackett and Lieutenant Arthur Bright cleared out the Zulus, but both British officers were fatally wounded in the action.For four hours Zulus armed with assegais and cowhide shields mounted attack after attack against murderous fire from the British laager. At 5:30 p.m., with the vigor of the Zulu attacks lessening, two further bayonet charges (one led by Wood) started a Zulu withdrawal. At that point Wood released his cavalry, and from then until dark, Buller and his horsemen pursued and killed the natives. Some 800 Zulus died within 300 yards of the laager.
Khambula Hill was perhaps the highlight of Wood's fighting career, a textbook demonstration of the correct way to laager and fight in an enemy territory. At night in Africa, incidentally, Wood used to make the rounds of the outposts alone. Walking through high grass, he would get soaking wet, and because the men had to sleep in their clothes, he tried to spare his subordinate officers the discomfort and the health hazard that attended this duty. However, he was often secretly followed by his own men. The officers were worried that Wood, who was losing his hearing, might not hear a challenge from one of their own sentries and might be shot.

In the final invasion of Zululand, Wood had command again of No. 4 Column, now named the Flying Column. He led the advance on the Zulu royal kraal at Ulundi and held the right side of the square in Lord Chelmsford's eventual victory there. The volley fire of the British square was augmented by artillery pieces and Gatling guns there could be only one outcome. The initial action lasted approximately 30 minutes before the British cavalry was let loose to pursue and rout.
Chelmsford wrote of Wood that 'although suffering at times severely in bodily heath [he] has never spared himself but has laboured incessantly night and day to overcome the innumerable difficulties.'

Wood now returned to England, where he was feted as a hero and assigned to further administrative duties. He briefly returned to Africa in 1880 in charge of a visit being made by Her Imperial Majesty the Empress Eugènie, who desired to see the place where her son the Prince Imperial Louis (Napoleon III was his father) had fallen during the Zulu War.

He returned again in 1881 as second-in-command to Maj. Gen. Sir George Colley for the ill-fated Transvaal war (First Boer War). Colley was killed at the Battle of Majuba Hill, and Wood was left with the ignominious task of negotiating peace with the victorious Boers. His return to England this time was not a happy one, since a vituperative press wanted him for a scapegoat. The media campaign proved ineffective, however, and he survived with his reputation intact.

The year 1882 found him in Egypt commanding the 4th Brigade of Wolseley's expeditionary force against the insurgents of Arabi Pasha. At the successful conclusion of that campaign, Wood was appointed to create a new Egyptian army, to which end he devoted the next 2 1/4 years. In 1884, he was put in charge of the lines of communication for the expedition to relieve Khartoum and rescue Charles 'Chinese' Gordon, but too late following the fall of Khartoum and the death of Gordon, he was appointed to act as army chief of staff in place of Redvers Buller.

The time abroad again told on his health, and back in England he took more than a year to fully recover. Nonetheless, he still rose steadily, commanding at Colchester and then Aldershot, where he placed a great deal of emphasis on the training methods employed. He became quartermaster general, then adjutant general, and finally general commanding II Army Corps, Southern Command. In 1903 he was awarded the baton of field marshal.

Evelyn Wood ended his army life as colonel of the Blues, a prestigious post he held from 1907 until his death in 1919 at the age of 81, a man certainly cast in the mold of the archetypical officer of the Victorian era. Not everybody liked him, since he could be somewhat less than modest even Wolseley thought him self-seeking and vain (like many other officers of that time). No one, though, could ever deny his courage, his stoicism under physical suffering, his concern for those who served under him, or his acumen and steadfastness as a commander under fire.

This article was written by Martin J. Hadwen and originally appeared in the April 1994 issue of Military History magazine.




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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Thu Sep 23, 2010 10:53 pm

Admin if the artical above as been posted before please delete it. I posted it as it gives a good in-sight into Wood's Millitary career. Idea
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:47 pm

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Henry Evelyn Wood was born in 1838 in Braintree, Essex, the youngest son and one of eleven children of Sir John Page Wood, Bt. He was educated at Marlborough
College and served as a Midshipman in the Crimean War during the siege of Sebastopol.

Seriously wounded in the attack on the Redan as a member of the Naval Brigade, Wood was mentioned in dispatches and recommended for the Victoria Cross. He then left the Royal Navy to join the Army, being commissioned a Cornet without purchase in the 13th Light Dragoons and subsequently at his own request transferred to the 17th Lancers in order to be able to participate in the Indian Mutiny.

Once in India he commanded a squadron of the 3rd Light Cavalry and saw action at Rajghur, Sindwaho (or Sinwaho) and was again recommended for the Victoria Cross.
In June of 1859, he joined Beatson’s Horse as a Brigade Major and successfully hunted out a band of robbers in the jungles between Beora and Maksandnaggar.

On September 4, 1860, he was awarded the Victoria Cross. The citation for the award of Lieutenant Wood’s Victoria Cross reads:On 19 October 1858 during an action at
Sinwaho, India, Lieutenant Wood was in command of a troop of light cavalry and attacked almost single-handed a body of rebels, whom he routed. He also subsequently at Sindhora, rescued, with the help of a duffadar and a sowar, a Potail from a band of robbers who had captured the man and carried him into the jungle where they intended to hang him.

Wood returned to England in 1860 having received the Indian Mutiny medal and the Victoria Cross for his services in India.In 1861 Wood was promoted Captain and in
1862 he became a Brevet Major in the 73rd Highlanders.

In 1865, he left the infantry for the cavalry and after a stint as an aide-de-camp in Dublin, Wood transferred to the General Staff at Aldershot until 1871, when he became a full Major in the 90th Regiment.In 1867, he married the sister of the 4th Viscount Southwell, Mary Pauline Southwell.

In 1873, Wood was promoted Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel and traveled to South Africa with Wolseley. In 1874 he served in the Ashanti War as a “Special Service Officer” under
Wolseley. He was wounded on January 31, 1874, at Armoaful. For his services, he received the Ashanti medal, was five times mentioned in despatches and was made a Companion of the Order of the Bath (C.B.)

Following the Ashanti Campaign, Wood held various staff appoints until the 90th Regiment embarked for South Africa in 1878, at which time he rejoined the regiment.

In January 1879 he took part in the Anglo-Zulu War and was given command of the left column of the army that crossed the Zulu frontier. Shortly thereafter, he received the local rank of Brigadier General. Defeated at Hlobane, he recovered and decisively beat the Zulus at Kambula and also took part in the final battle at Ulundi.For his services in the Zulu War, Evelyn Wood received the Zulu War medal and clasp, was mentioned in despatches fourteen times and raised to become a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (K.C.B.). Upon returning to England, he was appointed to command the Chatham district.

With the outbreak of the First Boer War, Wood was sent back to South Africa in January of 1881 with the local rank of Major General. Upon the death of Colley, he succeeded to command and the High Commissionership. He remained in Natal until February 1882, at which time he was awarded a Grand Cross of the Order of St. Michael and St. George (G.C.M.G.) and returned to the Chatham command.

Wood was given command of the Second Brigade of the Second Division in the Egyptian expedition to put down Arabi Pasha and later commanded the Fourth Brigade. Thereafter, he was made Sirdar of the Egyptian army until 1885, during which period he thoroughly reorganized it. Wood also served in the Nile campaign of 1884-1885, in command of the line of communications.

In 1886 he was allowed to return to Britain. He was awarded the Egypt medal with clasps, Order of the Medjidie 1st Class and the Khedive’s Star for his services during his time in Egypt.Promoted to Lieutenant-General in 1891, Wood was raised to the Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath (G.C.B.). He saw further service as Quartermaster-General at the War Office and as Adjutant-General of the Army.

Promoted full General in 1895, Wood commanded the II Army Corps and Southern Command from 1901 to 1904. On April 8, 1903, Sir Evelyn Wood was promoted Field Marshal.In 1907 he became Colonel of the Royal Horse Guards. After retiring from active service, Sir Evelyn Wood became chairman of the Association for the City of London, and on March 11, 1911 he was appointed Constable of the Tower of London, a position he would hold until his death.

Field Marshall Sir Evelyn Wood, V.C., G.C.B., G.C.M.G., died on the 2nd of December, 1919, at his home in Harlow, Essex. He is buried in Aldershot Military Cemetery.
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PostSubject: Sir H.E.Wood   Wed Jul 06, 2011 2:40 am

Hi all.
His book ' From Midshipman To Field Marshall ' is a great read , and I think would also have made a very decent movie / mini- series.
cheers 90th.
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sat Dec 31, 2011 12:51 am

FIELD MARSHALL SIR EVELYN WOOD video newsreel film.

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Click Here:
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sat Mar 09, 2013 8:26 pm

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PostSubject: Sir Evelyn Wood    Sun Mar 10, 2013 7:51 am

Nice get littlehand well worth reading . You need to study mo
Cheers 90th.
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:14 am

I see he even mentions "Browne"
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PostSubject: Sir Evelyn Wood    Sun Mar 10, 2013 9:39 am

John you'll find he's referring to the Lt Edward Stevenson Browne , VC ( Hlobane ) who later went on to become a General .
He certainly wouldnt be referring to '' Maori '' H - Browne .
90th.
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Wed Jun 05, 2013 11:45 pm

http://bps.britishpathe.com/hls-vod/flash/00000000/00074000/00074875.mp4.m3u8

Field Marshal Sir Evelyn Wood. Location of events unknown.

British Army Field Marshal Sir Henry Evelyn Wood (1838-1919) attends military equestrian event.Wood was a lifetime Army man; who served in various colonies; won the Victoria Cross at age 21. Here he is an elderly man; nearly 80.
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Dave

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Thu Jun 06, 2013 8:18 am

Cheers LH agree
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Mon Aug 11, 2014 10:48 pm

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GENERAL SIR H EVELYN WOOD ~ Stereoview 
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sat Nov 08, 2014 9:26 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sun Nov 09, 2014 12:26 am

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sun Nov 09, 2014 8:47 am

Just to correct some postings above:

It is Field Marshal not Field Marshall. Field Marshal is an appointment not a rank - so it is incorrect to say 'promoted Field Marshal' - the term is 'appointed Field Marshal'.
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Sun Sep 10, 2017 1:50 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:26 am

Les,

Where's the bureau?

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John Young Collection

JY
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xhosa2000

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:19 am

Hi JY.. he used to walk around with the Bureau under his arm as we know!.
i believe the swagger stick came from Waring & Gillow complete with secret
drawers.. Joker
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:26 am

Les,

I thought he used to get his swagger sticks from The Army & Navy Store. Joker

JY

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:37 pm

Very Happy Salute
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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:32 am

A photo I haven't seen before of Evelyn Wood's funeral at Aldershot on 6 December 1919. Supporters carrying his sword, hat, medals and saddle. On the left (with quite a few medals of his own) is a Mr Walkinshaw who is said to have been Wood's bugler during the AZW.

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Steve
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John Young

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PostSubject: Re: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC, GCB, GCMG   Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:58 am

Steve,

Alexander Walkinshaw, D.C.M., was mostly certainly Wood’s bugler during the campaign.  D.C.M. for his actions at the Battle of Zlobane.

A few years back I had the honour to take his descendants to see Wood’s house in Old Harlow. Where Walkinshaw was retained as his man-servant after he left the Army.

JY
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PostSubject: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC , CGB , GCMG    Thu Nov 02, 2017 12:08 pm

Hi Stephen
Excellent photo , Walkinshaw was Wood's Bugler during the AZW , Wood sent Walkinshaw to go back and get the Bible from Wood's horse which had been shot at Hlobane , this was so Wood could say some words whilst they were burying Campbell & Lloyd , Wood nominated him for an award , Walkinshaw eventually received The Silver Medal for Distinguished conduct in the field .
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PostSubject: Sir Henry Evelyn Wood VC , CGB , GCMG    Thu Nov 02, 2017 12:09 pm

Our posts crossed JY . Very Happy Salute
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