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 What sorts of training did recruits get

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joe

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PostSubject: What sorts of training did recruits get   Tue May 25, 2010 9:12 pm

hi
Could someone please give me details of what sorts of activities the training involved for the recruits going for SA.

Would it just be basic training like running and target practice along with bayonet drills?

Any extra information would be greatly appreciated

thanks joe
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james-millership

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Tue May 25, 2010 9:14 pm

Ive always wondered this Joe. Id love to know what they went through. Ive been through basic training myself, so I know what its like in todays army. But knowing what it was like back then would be fascinating!

James M
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90th

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PostSubject: taining of troops.   Wed May 26, 2010 2:32 am

hi all.
Cant tell you the full details of the training undertaken by troops involved in the first invasion , but have read some
of those involved in the 2nd invasion were very raw and inexperienced , some only having fired a few practice rounds
if any at all . I will try and look futher into it .
cheers 90th.
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Neil Aspinshaw

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Wed May 26, 2010 9:13 am

The majority of training would be based around, Drill, Musketary practice, bayonet fighting excercise and theory.

Drill, the obvious Rifle drill, marching order, but most importantly offensive and defensive arrangements, prepare for cavalry,

Musketary practice, which involved the firing of ball and blank ammunition, range assesment etc

Bayonet fighing exercise, a vital peice in the jigsaw, the various guard positions, parry points and stance

Recruits were offered certificates in education, many had no formal education.

Do bare in mind the 1/24th were no mugs, they had been in South Africa a long time and had marched 100's of miles, go out an try and get a copy of "The Road to Isandlwana" by Philip Gon, the 80th had been sweating it out in the Perak campaign of 1877.
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joe

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Wed May 26, 2010 3:31 pm

hi
thanks for clearing that up neil

thanks joe
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Dave

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Wed May 26, 2010 3:56 pm

Probably more marching that running. I wonder if it was suggested that if they trained soldiers to run they would run from battle, A bit like the air force in the WW1. They did not issue parachutes in case the pilot jumped instead of engaging. Just a thought. !!!!
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90th

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PostSubject: what sort of training did recriuts have.   Sun May 30, 2010 10:31 am

hi all .
I had a look around in my books and journals etc etc and couldnt find anything else . I think Neil has covered
it excellently . Idea
cheers 90th.
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littlehand

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Sun May 30, 2010 11:32 am

I'm hoping Neil can confirm this is correct and that this was the type of drill used during 1879.

The subsequent images show just how different the Victorian army military drill was. The drill progression of this late Victorian period have far more in common with earlier nineteenth century drill. than it does with modern drill.

Hope this helps on some points.

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And just out of curiosity doe's anyone know where the Salute originated from.
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90th

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PostSubject: what sort of training did recriuts have.   Sun May 30, 2010 12:54 pm

hi littlehand.
This is a stab but I think it originated in Roman Times , sure someone will set the record straight. :) .
cheers 90th.
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old historian2

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Sun May 30, 2010 12:57 pm

Hi all. This from: Wikipedia

"The exact origin of this salute has been lost in time. One theory is that it came from Roman soldiers' shading their eyes from the intense light that was pretended to shine from the eyes of their superiors. Another theory is that it came from when men-at-arms wore armour—a friendly approach would include holding the reins of the horse with the left hand while raising the visor of the helmet with the right, so that one would know they meant not to battle them. A third theory is that the salute, and the handshake, came from a way of showing that the right hand (the fighting hand) was not concealing a weapon. A combination of showing an empty right hand, palm outwards, which was then raised formally to a helmet to raise a visor would demonstrate non-aggressive intentions, and therefore respect. In Tudor times the helmet of a suit of armour was known as a 'sallet', a word very similar to the word 'salute'.

The most widely accepted theory is that it evolved from the practice of men raising their hats in the presence of officers. Tipping one's hat on meeting a social superior was the normal civilian sign of respect at the time. Repeated hat-raising was impractical if heavy helmets were worn, so the gesture was stylised to a mere hand movement. It was also common for individuals who did not wear hats to "tug their forelock" in imitation of the gesture of tipping the hat.

The naval salute, with the palm downwards originated because the palms of naval ratings, particularly deckhands, were often dirty through working with lines. Because it would be insulting to present a dirty palm to an officer, the palm was turned downwards. During the Napoleonic Wars, British crews saluted officers by touching a clenched fist to the brow."
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littlehand

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Fri Jul 20, 2012 11:11 pm

The reinforcements provided for the second invasion. How much training did they get before being transported to SA. I have read a few accounts, one being from John Dunn, who noticed during a battle the troops had not adjusted their sights and their rounds were firing low. There are also accounts of new recruits panicking. Just how raw we're these troops. I have a feeling it was a bit like' Your country need you" Here's a uniform, here's your rifle, get on board. Not sure if it's true I have read that civilians join up o seek vengeance for those KIA at Isandlwana. Possibly relatives of the slain...
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Ray63

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Fri Jul 20, 2012 11:27 pm

Is there away of finding how old the new recruits were, they were seasoned soldiers in the 1st invasion. Seeing action in the previous kafir wars.
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Mr M. Cooper

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PostSubject: What sort of training did recruits get.   Fri Jul 20, 2012 11:30 pm

Hi LH.

Well according to Ian Knight in his book 'Companion to the AZW', he says that "replacements were hurried out from drafts appointed from no fewer than eleven Line battalions", meaning that the majority would have been seasoned men and not raw recruits straight from their training depots.

You might be right about men joining up to seek revenge for those KIA at iSandlwana, but I think they might have been a bit late getting there.
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Colonel Tucker

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Mon Jul 23, 2012 11:17 pm

Victorian bayonet drill done by the book is a great work out I`m sure Neil will 2nd this.
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Chard1879

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PostSubject: Re: What sorts of training did recruits get   Tue Jul 24, 2012 12:19 am

Bayonet drill, is this something the reinactment group carryout. If yes is there a video footage of this drill.
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