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 Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.

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littlehand

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PostSubject: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Tue Jul 05, 2011 5:43 pm

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Corporal George Ashby was in "Pulleine's Rangers" and "Baker's Horse" in the Zulu Wars. He returned to England c.1881 and married there and returned to South Africa where he may have joined the Cape Government Railways.

CORPS OF VETERANS.
Corporal Ashby is an old member of the South Australian Corps of Veterans whose members were provided with the badge of honour which only veterans may wear—a replica of the R.S.L. badge with the word "Veteran" inscribed beneath.
Corps of Veterans started in 1910 and RSL in 1915
1915 to 1919, badges were state based Returned Soldiers Associations, in 1916 a national Returned Soldiers Association badge appeared and gradually replaced the state badges.
South Australia's early badge was oval.
..........................
R.S.L. Membership card files.
From the President of the South Australian R.S.L. 31 March 2005.
GEORGE ASHBY was an Honoury Life Member and
holder of RSL State Badge Number 2.
Interestingly, his Unit was shown as Frontier Light Horse.
His address was Murray Street, Rosewater.
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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Wed Aug 03, 2011 1:57 pm

MR. L. E. COLLEY, the secretary of South Australian Corps of Veterans, told me yesterday of an- other veteran of the Zulu War of 1878 to 1879 living in South Australia, and it was through a paragraph in this column that another member of the Corps of Veterans has been en- rolled in Mr. W. W. Bell, of Quorn. Recently Mr. George Ashby related how he believed that he was now the only representative of Pulleine's Rangers left in this State. Mr. Bell saw the paragraph and wrote to Mr. Ashby, who passed it on to Mr. Colley. Mr. Bell has now been enrolled in the Corps of Veterans and provided with the badge of honor which only vete- rans may wear—a replica of the R.S.L. badge with the word "Veteran" in- scribed beneath. Special efforts would be made Mr. Colley said, to get the new member down from Quorn for the Commonwealth dinner to the veterans in May. The Veteran's Story MR. BELL'S letter to Mr. Ashby gives an interesting story of his adventures, and when the old chap is in Adelaide I hope he will call in, for he must have many tales to tell, and it is always enjoyable to meet those who have served the Empire in the days that have passed.

"I was interested in reading your statement in which you supposed that you were the only representative of Pulleine's Rangers during the Zulu War of 1877, 78. and 79," he wrote to Mr. Ashby. "I also am the holder of a Zulu War Medal for 1879. having served twelve months with the Kaff- rarian Rifles, which were recruited ln King William Town, Cape Colony, for active service in Zulu Land. We garrisoned towns in Transvaal for the first six months, and then served with the Northern Flying Column until Cetewayo's power was broken by Lord Chelmsford at Ulundi. I was at Kambule when 11,000 Zulus attacked the fort and were repulsed, leaving 4,000 dead on the field. After Ulundi we were disbanded and given ten guineas a man to find our way to the sea coast —450 miles away—in the best way we could. "South Africa being in a dreadful state after the war I came to Adelaide on New Year's Eve, 1880. and after knocking about the country for eighteen months, I joined the South Australian Railways at Port Augusta and worked up from laborer, engine cleaner, fireman to first-class engine driver, and on December 31, 1926, was given my discharge from the railways after forty-five years service. For twelve years I have been on the retired list and am living at Quorn in my own home. Three of my sons served in the Great War, one making the supreme sacrifice and is buried at Trots Arbries in France. Adventures At Sea "I was seven years at sea", Mr. Bell continued. "I served my apprenticeship of four years with the City Line of Geo. Smith & Co. of Glasgow. I was on the City of Pekin (Captain McEacharn) homeward bound to London from Rangoon with rice when we had a head on collision one dark night in the North Atlantic and were forty hours in the open boats until we were picked up by the Loch Cann, homeward bound from Melbourne to Liverpool, and were landed at Liverpool a month later with just what we stood up in, having lost everything when our ship went down. Still, like you, I enjoyed my days at sea and have many pleasant memories to keep me occupied in myretirement."

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PostSubject: Corp . George Ashby   Thu Aug 04, 2011 7:16 am

Hi All .
According to the rolls I have , Ashby was a Corp in Pulleine's Rangers , then a Trooper in Bakers Horse .
cheers 90th.
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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Fri Mar 20, 2015 12:08 am

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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Sun Aug 30, 2015 10:06 pm

"A ROMANTIC CAREER.
A Story of Sir Redvers Buller.
(By a Special Reporter.]
The South Australian Corps of Veterans possesses in its ranks many men who have had exciting experiences, but none more so than Cpl. George Ashby, formerly of
the Frontier light Horse, whose career has been a particularly romantic one. He has settled down in the little hamlet of Caloote, on the Murray, and I met him a few days ago while he was on a flying visit to Adelaide. He is a retiring man, but after some little difficulty I persuaded him to give me a few particulars of his life. He was born at Greenwich 65 years ago. His father at that time followed the peaceful occupation of an orange merchant, but had been a lieutenant in the Royal Navy under Lord Nelson, and had seen any amount of fighting, too. — Ran Away to Sea. — Fired by the stories that he had heard his father and his old naval cronies tell, young Ashby, upon the death of his fighting parent, ran away to sea. He stowed away on a ship belonging to the Hudson Bay Company, and went to Bos- ton. He did so well that he was taken on permanently, and made voyages all round the world. Leaving the company's service he joined the London Fire Brigade under the celebrated Capt. Shaw, but his
stay with whe firefighters was a brief one. Then he went to sea again and finally brought up in Algoa Bay, where he became the manager of a club. On September 23, 1877, the Kaffirs broke out in rebellion, and all white men were called to the colours. Mr. Ashby lost no time in joining the Frontier Light Horse, and was attached as a scout to the 24th Regiment. They moved into the Transkei, and their first engage- ment was Drybosch, against the Gaekwas. The next fight was with Sandhilla's men, in the Pondonese country. Then Cpl. Ashby was stricken down with typhus, and was sent to Delagoa Bay to recupe- rate. In the meantime the 24th Regiment, together with the Frontier Light Horse, had crossed the Tugela into the Zulus' country, and shortly afterwards the ter- rible disaster at Isandlawana occurred. Fol- lowing on this came the awful affair of Rorke's Drift. As soon as the news of these defeats reached the coast Cpl. Ashby went to the local commandant and claimed the right of service at the front. His wish was acceded to, and he was dis- patched in charge of 200 other volunteers down the coast of Durban. —'In the Valley of Death.'— Soon afterwards came the most excit- ing incident in Cpl. Ashby's career. The force he was attached to was ordered to capture Umbeline's stronghold, on the top of Hlobane Mountain. They were 500 strong, and in charge of Col. Weatherley. The only chance of reaching the summit was by scaling a narrow pass. The Zulus, armed with rifles and assegais, fought hard to prevent the British force reaching the top, but by making the attack at day break, the latter, in the face of tremen- dous obstacles, attained their object. A rapid breakfast was being partaken, when it was discovered that the mountain was surrounded by a vast horde of Zulus. An attempt was made to descend on the side opposite to the pass. Cpl. Ashby and
his little party endeavoured to fight their way down, and at last he and a man named Andrew Gemmell, now living in New Zealand, were the only ones left. With their faces to the foe, firing as they retired, they kept the Zulus at bay. Then an unfortunate thing happened, Cpl. Ashby's rifle burst, but, fortunately for him, Col. Buller, afterwards Sir Redvers Buller, who was one of the, party, came galloping by, and offered to take him up behind him. Col. Buller was a heavy man, and his horse was a light one, and realizing this, Cpl. Ashby declined his generous offer. But the colonel stayed with him, and, Cpl. Ashby having picked up a rifle and ammunition from a fallen comrade, the two men retired, firing whenever a foeman showed himself. They eventually reached the main camp, and for this service, as well as for saving the lives of two fellow-officers on the same occasion, Col. Buller received the Victoria Cross. Out of 500 men who made the at- tack on the Hlobane Mountain, more than, 300 met their death. —The End of the War.— The next day the battle of Campbell's Hill was fought, and shortly afterwards the battle of Ulindi took place, when the Bri- tish force, under Lord Chelmsford, in- flicted a terrible defeat on the enemy. This was Cpl. Ashby's last fight. Within 12 days Cetewayo was captured and the war was over. Cpl. Ashby subsequently came
to Australia. He has been many things during his career— a miner, a diver, and has even captained a lifeboat. He has saved many lives, and has more than once been recommended for the Royal Humane Society's medal, but it has not yet been awarded to him. He was awarded the medal and clasp for his three years' ser- vice in the Zulu war, and this is his proudest possession".

Source:The Register Adelaide SA 1901-1929
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PostSubject: Corp George Ashby Pulleine's Rangers & Bakers Horse    Mon Aug 31, 2015 7:52 am

A few errors but he was 65 at the time , what an interesting life he led .
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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Tue Nov 17, 2015 9:18 pm

"Corporal George Ashby, born at Greenwich, Kent. In Pulleine's Rangers in the Frontier Light Horse, Baker's Light Horse. In an interview to "The South Australian Register" newspaper of Adelaide, South Australia, dated 2 June 1917, Trooper George Ashby's experiences were reported in full - Soon afterwards came the most exciting incident in Cpl. Ashby's career. The force he was attached to was ordered to capture Umbeline's stronghold, on the top of Zhlobane Mountain. They were 500 strong, and in charge of Col. Weatherly. The only chance of reaching the summit was by scaling a narrow pass. The Zulus, armed with rifles and assegais, fought bard to prevent the British force reaching the top. but by making the attack at day break, the latter, in the face of tremendous obstacles, attained their object. A rapid breakfast was being partaken, when it was discovered that the mountain was surrounded by a vast horde of Zulus. An attempt was made to descend on the his little party endeavoured to fight their way down, and at last he and a man named Andrew Gemmell, now living in New Zealand, were the only ones left. With their faces to the foe, firing as they retired, they kept the Zulus at bay. Then an unfortunate thing happened, Cpl. Ashby's rifle burst, but,- fortunately for him, Col. Buller, afterwards Sir Redvers Buller, who was one of the, party, came galloping by, and offered to 'take him up behind him. Col. Buller was a heavy man, and his horse was a light one, and realizing this, Cpl. Ashby declined his generous offer. But the Colonel stayed with him, and, Cpl. Ashby having picked up a rifle and ammunition from a fallen comrade, the two men retired, firing whenever a foeman showed himself. They eventually reached the main camp, and for this service, as well as for saving the lives of two fellow-officers on the same occasion, Col. Buller received the Victoria Cross. Out of 500 men who made the attack on the Zjilobane Mountain, more than, 300 met their death. The next day the battle of Campbell's Hill was fought, and shortly afterwards the battle of Ulundi took place, when the British force, under Lord Chelmsford,. Inflicted a terrible defeat on the enemy. This was Cpl. Ashby's last fight. Within 12 days Cetewayo was captured and the war was over. Cpl. Ashby subsequently came to Australia."

Source: worldlibrary
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PostSubject: Corp George Ashby Pulleine's Rangers & Bakers Horse    Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:08 am

The The Battle of Campbell's Hill ??? , a new one on me ! lol
90th No

PS Thanks Ray for the correction , much appreciated Very Happy


Last edited by 90th on Wed Nov 18, 2015 8:47 am; edited 1 time in total
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Ray63

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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Wed Nov 18, 2015 8:27 am

You mean "New"
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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:21 am

Campbells Hill? Possibly Khambula translated?
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PostSubject: Corp George Ashby Pulleine's Rangers & Bakers Horse    Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:44 am

No doubt it means Khambula , but seriously ! Shocked Shocked Shocked Suspect Suspect
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PostSubject: Re: Corporal George Ashby was in Pulleine's Rangers and Baker's Horse.   Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:51 am

Very Happy
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