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Captain David Moriarity, 80th, KIA Ntombe
This photograph taken when he was in the 7th Regiment prior to his transfer to the 80th. [Mac & Shad] (Isandula Collection)
The Battle of Isandlwana: One of The Worst Defeats of The British Empire - Military History
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 Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment

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mons14

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jul 02, 2010 7:31 pm

Just stumbled on this post, excellent photo's and thank you for sharing them!

Couple of questions if I may,

- Where are these wonderful plaques housed?

- The photograph of Pte. Popple 2/24th is one I have never seen, do you know the source of the original photograph, as I would love to have a better scan of the image?

Thanks,

David
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mons14

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jul 09, 2010 2:53 pm

Further to my last, some details on Pte. S. Popple 2/24 from Norman Holme's 'The Silver Wreath':

1709 Pte. Samuel POPPLE

The effects roll gives his number incorrectly as '1079'. Attested at Southwick on 21/2/65, aged 23 years 10 months. Served in 'G' Company, killed at the battle of Isandlwana January 22, 1879. Effects claimed by his widow, Medal and clasp '1877-8-9' issued on 7/4/81.


It is very rare to see named photographs of 24th Regt. other ranks, which is why I found the above photo so interesting.

My question still stands - any more information on the fantastic little photo of Popple would be much appreciated....
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jul 09, 2010 6:20 pm

Hi Mons14

The photo was posted by Tim Needham. You can get hold of him through Admin.

Admin knows how to contact him for you.

I know it does not help much.

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jul 09, 2010 11:40 pm

Mons14. Tim saw the question on the forum, and e-mail this before I could ask him.
Thanks Tim.

"In answer to the questions from 'mons14' reference the memorial to the men of the 1st & 2nd Battalions 24th Regiment, it is housed in the Regimental Chapel at Brecon Cathedral; the photo of Private S. Popple came from the Keynsham Light Horse. I would be obliged if you could pass this on to him."
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1879graves

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jul 09, 2010 11:58 pm

Admin wrote:

"I the photo of Private S. Popple came from the Keynsham Light Horse. "

mons14

Rai a senior member of the KLH may be of help now, PM him

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mons14

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:51 am

Thanks so much for that guys, and to Tim for your help - I'm not familiar with the Keynsham Light Horse...forgive my ignorance, who are they and do they have a web site?

I'm out at the moment, so just a quick note will write a fuller response when I'm back home.

Thanks for your attention,

mons14
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:08 am

Hi. Mons14. Keynsham Light Horse [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] Unfortunately the website is no longer running. There main aim was to locate visit and record the Graves of those that took part in the Zulu War of 1879. Without their hard work and dedication nearly all of the photos on this forum and others would not exist. 1879Graves as stated. Rai is a senior member of the KLH and hopefully can give you some more information.

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mons14

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Sat Jul 10, 2010 4:51 am

The photograph of the plaque is impressive and caught my attention for more then just that reason - I've just purchased the Isandlwana casualty medal to one of the 2/24th men whose name just happens to be clearly visible in the photo.

I will show you the medal, and identify the recepient once I actually have it in my hands in the next few days.

Very sad that the Keynsham Light Horse no longer has a web site. Is there any other way of making contact with this organization - does it operate as an archive to historians?

Thanks again for all your help,

mons14



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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Jan 23, 2012 1:03 pm

I'm a new member who is researching 2038 Pte. Samuel WALKER 2/24
Attested at Sehffield on 23/7/63, apparently aged 19 years (though have reason to suspect he may have been born in 1850, not 1844, but don't know where). Served in 'G' Company. Effects claimed by his father. Medal and clasp '1877-8-9' issued 28/3/82 . My son has his medal, so I've been searching for weeks now on so many related sites and cannot find out any more information on this man, such as where he was born etc. Is he on any war memorial? Would there be more info at the regimental museum, and if so is it all now in Wales, even though he was in 2nd Warwickshire Foot? Would there be more information at TNA? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Jan 23, 2012 2:06 pm

Hi Linterburg and welcome.
2038 Samuel Walker KIA isandlwana is indeed on the memorial and I have no doubt the fundis on the site will be gathering the information for you
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Jan 23, 2012 2:52 pm

Hello linterbug and welcome to the forum.

Samuel Walker is mentioned in 'The Noble 24th' by Norman Holme, and is listed as attesting in Sheffield as you stated.

Your confusion about the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment of foot now having it's regimental museum in Wales, comes about through the then governments meddling, and the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment being attached (wrongly in my opinion) to the 25th subdistrict which encompassed the South Wales border area, and later (again through government meddling), the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment now finds itself lost in Wales, however, there is little that anyone can do about that now, but I do understand your confusion and hope this explanation helps. The curator of the museum (Bill Cainan) is a member of the forum, he is a good man, and I am sure he will be able to help you with this if you pm him.

Regards, Martin.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Jan 23, 2012 5:48 pm

Hi Linterbug
sadly, the muster rolls of the 2/24th, regimental diary etc, were all lost at iSandlwana. The records (attestation papers) etc of men who were deceased, were also discarded and further to this, many papers were destroyed in an air raid during WW2.
Therefore, sadly, very little joy will be found at Kew. Ususally, the man's biographical entry in the Noble 24h or Silver Wreath, both by Norman Holme is the sum total of all that there is available to these brave fellows.


Last edited by tasker224 on Tue Jan 24, 2012 6:43 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Tue Jan 24, 2012 9:06 am

Hi Linterbug

As Curator of the Regimental Museum of The Royal Welsh in Brecon, I would echo Tasker's comments. On Private Walker, we have Norman Holme's work, and that is it.

Also, I can not agree with Martin's statements regarding the 24th, and with which I must take issue. The moving of the 24th to Brecon in 1873 was done for very sound reasons (part of the Cardwell army reforms which included measures to rationalise recruiting), and was not the result of "government meddling". Also the Regiment is not "lost in Wales" - this is mischievous! The Royal Welsh has clear and firm traditions and is proud of its heritage. A heritage that includes different titles (our antecedent regiments include the 23rd Foot, the 24th Foot, the 41st Foot, the 69th Foot, the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, the 2nd (Warwickshire) Regiment, the South Wales Borderers, the Monmouthsire Regiment, the Welch Regiment, and the Royal Regiment of Wales ) and different locations. The Regimental Headquarters of The Royal Welsh is currently located in Cardiff and the Regiment is justifiably proud of its Welsh links.

Martin clearly has serious issues withg the Government deciding to move the 24th Regiment to Brecon in 1873, but it is now clearly too late for him to organise a petition to oppose the move !

Bill
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Tue Jan 24, 2012 1:10 pm

Hi Linterbug

It looks like my friend Bill can't help you with this, which is a shame really, but at least your son has this mans medal.

It would also appear that Bill is getting a little confused with his statement. He first says that it wasn't government meddling that moved the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment to Brecon, but then later, he goes on to say that it WAS the government that decided to move the regiment to Brecon (very confusing).

He then tries to confuse you even more when he gives you the different regimental numbers and names, making it appear that there are more regiments involved than there actually are. Lets go through them and see how it works out.

The 23rd foot (The Royal Welsh Fusiliers), merged with the Royal Regiment of Wales in 2004, the later in 2006 became part of the Royal Welsh.

The 24th foot (The 2nd Wartwickshire Regiment), was moved by the government, and later renamed in 1881 again by government meddling to the South Wales Borderers, it was later merged in 1969 with the 41st (Welch regiment) to form the Royal Regiment of Wales, and is now part of the Royal Welsh.

The 69th foot was actually the redesignated 2nd Battalion of the 24th foot, it was given the name of (The South Lincolnshire Regiment), but again through government meddling in 1881, it was amalgamated into the 41st (Welch regiment), and is now part of the Royal Welsh.

The Monmouthshire regiment which Bill mentions, was the 43rd foot, in 1881 the government amalgamated it with the 52nd (Oxfordshire regiment) which in 1908 became The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light infantry, and which is now part of 'The Rifles'.

So you will see from the above that the government of the time did meddle around with the Army, and it always makes me wonder if they got things mixed up somewhat. For instance, why move an already established South Wales border regiment (43rd foot Monmouthshire regiment) to Oxford, and then move an already established (24th foot 2nd Warwickshire regiment) to the South Wales borders? It makes no sense to me at all, that is why I said that the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment is lost in Wales, it was raised in England for the defence of England, it had an English county title, but for some strange reason it was moved to the South Wales borders, yet the 43rd (Monmouthshire) regiment which was already in the South Wales borders, is moved to Oxfordshire England, does this make any sense? I think that some meddling idiot in the government of the time, must have either been on the bottle or had a brain storm, it just doesn't make sense.

Anyway Linterbug, don't take mine or Bills word for this, I would suggest that you get the opinion of one of the best (if not the best) experts on all this, and that is Ian Knight. Treat yourself to a good book of his called 'Companion to the Anglo - Zulu War', go to page 222 and read what Ian has to say on all this, you will be very much informed.

Regards, Martin.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Tue Jan 24, 2012 6:56 pm

Are not the government in charge of the army, and have always been?
Martin, the way I read Bill's post was that he was taking issue with the mischievious use of the word "meddling" not "government."
Oxfordshire, Monmouthshire, Welsh or English - we are all on the same side! No ex-soldier likes it when their regiment is amalgamated or subjected to a name change in the interests of some government money saving reform. But with all due respect Martin, you seem to take everything very personally when perhaps there is no need to. There was no conspiracy by the government, or Stanley Baker, or whoever else against the Warwickshire Regiment, or the Monmouthshire Regiment, or the Welsh or the English.
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Tue Jan 24, 2012 7:38 pm

tasker, I think you should read Bill's post again, you will find that Bill was saying 'mischievious' because I said that the 24th was 'lost in Wales'.

Did I mention 'conspiracy' or 'Baker' ? scratch

It would appear that you enjoy trying to find faults with peoples postings on this forum, then trying to correct them with your own interpretation of how you see things (which must be right of course).

Could I have hit the nail on the head here I wonder? scratch
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:02 pm

No, you have just smashed your own finger again with your own hammer.

Martin, if you read my above post, you will see I was referring to the word "meddling" not mischievous.

You did not mention conspiracy or Baker in your above post, but in the spot the mistakes in Zulu thread, you mention that Baker had "a score to settle with the English and saw his chance in the film Zulu."

(Ridiculous, quite frankly)!
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Tue Jan 24, 2012 9:01 pm

Well I can't feel any pain.

Read Bills post again, he said "Also the regiment is not 'lost in Wales'-this is mischievous".

You said that the way you had read Bills post was that HE was taking issue with the mischievous word 'meddling'.

I then corrected you and said that Bill was saying mischievous because I said 'lost in Wales'.

I have told you about the 'write up' that was posted by littlehand, in which it said that Baker had a score to settle with the English, and that he saw his chance with the film Zulu, but like you say, that was on the Zulu-spot the mistakes thread, so what has it got to do with this thread?
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:49 pm

Martin what it has to do with is this: the single thread that runs through almost every one of your posts on every thread, is your recurring theme that the 24th Foot in 1879, being entitled the Warwickshire Regiment.
No one disputes that, you're preaching to the converted.
Where your arguments become irrational, is when you imply that:

1. Stanley Baker's epic British made film, Zulu, was somehow his way of settling "a score with the English." This loses me, if you actually really do believe that.
2. The Cardwell Reforms incorporating the 24th Foot into 25th brigade, causing it to be "lost in Wales" - a British Regiment lost in Britain - was the result of "some meddling idiot in the government of the time, must have either been on the bottle or had a brain storm" - now that is not rational, or sensible is it?

As Bill says, it is 131 years "too late" for you to do anything about the latter and Zulu will always be the epic film that it is, irrespective of your opinions or your anger over them. Please don't allow events that happened before you were born, bother you so much, I do worry for you somewhat. I would suggest that when/if you retire and have some time on your hands, you consider writing a paper, article or book on your views about the Zulu War, the 24th, Zulu, the whole lot. It would be something positive for you to channel your energy into, cathartic and I would certainly want to be the first to buy a copy.

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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Thu Jan 26, 2012 12:45 am

tasker

It is obvious that you haven't read the write up I mentioned, otherwise you wouldn't be lost at point1;

To answer point 2; Can you see the logic in moving an already established South Wales Border regiment (43rd Monmouthshire), to Oxfordshire in England, and moving an already established regiment from Warwickshire in England (24th 2nd Warwickshire), to the South Wales Border? Would it not have been far easier just to rename the 43rd Monmouthshires to the SWB (as it was already there), and if an amalgamation of two regiments was necessary, then it would have been a very simple thing to have amalgamated the 6th (1st Warwickshire) regiment with the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment into the 1st and 2nd Btns The Warwickshire Regiment, would this not have been a lot simpler, rather than uproot two established regiments and move them miles away from their bases? Monmouthshire (since the 1970's), is now part of Wales (and always has been according to you), but its regiment (the 43rd) is now lost in England, Warwickshire is in England but the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment, is now lost in Wales. Now do you understand why I said that some meddling idiot in the government of the time, must have either been on the bottle or had a brain storm? If you read one of my posts above, you will see that I have already said that there was little that anyone can do about it now, but then again, you never know, someone in the government may well see the error that was created back then and decide to make it right, but I doubt it.

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 12:03 pm

Martin

Oh dear, I had hoped the “bring back the 2nd Warwickshire Regiment” campaign had run its course, but clearly it hasn’t !!!!

First let me clarify one point. Tasker was quite correct in the way he interpreted what I had said above, Martin, you were not, despite quoting me ! I was, and remain, very concerned that you consider the setting up of the 24th Regimental depot in Brecon to be the result of “meddling” and that you have now qualified that with an ever more outlandish statement - “some meddling idiot in the government of the time, must have either been on the bottle or had a brain storm?” By “meddling idiot” can I am presume you are referring to Edward Cardwell, Secretary of State for War between 1870 and 1874 ? There can be no one that doubted that the Army was in serious need of reform in 1870 – the shortcomings experienced by the British Army in both the Crimean War and the Indian Mutiny are self evident. In addition the Prussian victories over Austria and France clearly indicated how far Britain had fallen behind in terms of military professionalism. Cardwell as a result began a series of sweeping reforms that were to continue through to 1881 and which today carry his name – “Cardwell’s Army Reforms”. Following the undoubted success of these reforms, I doubt that many (if any) would class Cardwell as “some meddling idiot” !!!!!

You need to look in detail at the state of the army in 1870 and I can do no better than refer you to two classics on the subject – “The Late Victorian Army 1868-1902” by Edward M Spiers and “The Victorian Army at Home 1858-1899” by Alan Ramsey Skelley. Both are packed full of statistics which put the state of the army at that time into proper perspective. You need to appreciate that army recruits in the 18th Century were mainly non-skilled agricultural workers, by the second half of the 19th Century, this had changed to non-skilled industrial workers, reflecting the increasing industrialisation of Britain. Regiments needed to be based close to these new potential recruiting areas as opposed to the old rurally focussed locations. Within South Wales, the “heads of the valleys” had seen a massive increase in population with the establishment of the coal, iron and steel industries. The area attracted a huge influx of people, particularly from Ireland. In times of economic downturn, this area would prove very fruitful in terms of recruiting – basically, starve or join the army ! Cardwell, aware of the problems the army was facing in getting recruits, decided on a re-organisation of the regimental structure as a means of dealing with the issue. For example, Warwickshire which is predominantly rural in nature, and therefore with few potential recruits, had to supply men for two line regiments (the 1st and 2nd Warwickshire Regts), while the South Wales borders with plenty of potential recruits had no line regiments at all to supply. It is therefore fairly easy to understand why the second of the two Warwickshire Regiments was moved to Brecon. And, in any case, what ties did the 2nd Warwickshire Regiment actually have with that county (apart from the title) ? How many recruits came from the county ? Was the Regiment based in the County ? Did the Regiment have a Depot in the County ? It is also important to understand that any move of the regiments of the line also needed to link in with the location of militia battalions, and various volunteer corps. There were sufficient of these in the Welsh border area to justify the location of a Brigade Sub-Depot there. Not withstanding their county titles, for the first time in the Army’s history, regiments enjoyed a permanent static centre or “home” firmly associated with a territorial area or county. This applied equally to the 24th and thus Brecon became “home” . They were given the counties of Cardigan, Radnor, Brecon and Monmouth for recruiting purposes, though (as the records show) the recruiting sergeants did not ply their trade specifically to those counties !

This worked fairly easily for the first 25 regiments of the line which had two battalions, but was not so easy for those with only one battalion. The grouping of two single battalion regiments was (in theory) focussed on the seniority of the senior of the two regiments, but this was not always so. The 69th Regiment therefore came into Wales to join the 41st Regiment and the 43rd Regiment left Wales to join the 52nd Regiment. In 1881, regimental names were changed, where necessary, to reflect the actual locality of the regimental depot. The 2nd Warwickshire’s name was therefore changed to “The South Wales Borderers”. However, the regimental numbers were clung to almost religiously as they of course reflected seniority. So 18 months after B Company had defended Rorke’s Drift under the title of the 2nd Warwickshire Regiment it was re-titled the SWB. However, they were the same men, the same company, the same regiment (still the 24th) – just the headed paper changed !!!!!

On another point – your condemnation of Stanley Baker and his epic film “Zulu” needs looking at. You ascribe various motives to him, but offer no evidence to support these ideas. Have you read any of his biographies ? Have you spoken to his widow , Lady Ellen Baker ? Have you read Sheldon Hall’s book ? No, so how do you know he had “biased” views and “had a score to settle with the English” (you have said this above and as the phrase is not in inverted comers, I presume they are your own words ?). I have made the point before that I think you are seeing things in the film that others do not. How many of the named (speaking part) characters are clearly “Welsh”, how long do these characters have on screen as a percentage of the whole ? Clearly Stanley Baker is reflecting the fact that the 24th had a greater percentage of Welshmen than most other regiments at that time (the exceptions being the 23rd and 41st Regiments). And yes, we all (well, most of us) accept the errors contained in the film without thinking in terms of any deliberate attempt to mislead.

You persist in trying to deny that there no more than a handful of Welshmen in the 24th and/or at Rorke’s Drift , but you have consistently failed to answer the question that I raised some time ago – exactly what defines a “Welshman” ? Is it where he was born, where his father was born, where he lived, what he spoke, what nationality he felt he was. It is only if you apply a fixed definition EQUALLY to ALL of the men, that you will get the definitive answer you seem to be seeking. However, that information is simply not available. We have a mixture of “qualifications” being applied to the names, and of course that means the results will always be open to interpretation. As I’ve said a number of times before, we simply do not know how many “Welshmen” there were in the 24th, only that the Regiment including a higher proportion of them than most other regiments.

Most of your points are not argued on the basis of primary sources, but on wishful thinking. You frequently rely on secondary sources and occasionally even misquote those ! An example of that would be the statements you made on the number of long service/short service men serving in 1879. You misquoted Ian Knight on that, and once I had produced statistics (based on primary sources in the Museum) to disprove your assumption, you conveniently let the subject drop. I notice recently that you refer readers to Ian Knight’s “Companion to The AZW” and specifically to his section on “Wales and the AZW”. However, nowhere in that article does Ian make any statement as to WHY the 24th moved to Brecon, though you seem to imply that he did.

As to the historical advisor on any re-make of “Zulu”, I notice you favour Ian Knight and Julian Whybra, two excellent historians who I have the utmost respect for. However, you surely are aware that even with their comprehensive knowledge, there are occasions when even they do not agree ! This is what History is about – there are very few things that have happened in the past where you will get universal agreement from people as to what exactly went on – even if those people were actually there !

I will conclude this lengthy (over lengthy ?) response with a plea -if you are going to make “definitive” statements could you please state your evidence (sources) you are using to substantiate the statement, or clearly precede the statement with the words “It is my opinion that .........” or “I believe that ....”. That way readers of this site will be able to make up their own minds on the validity or otherwise of the points being made. I would very much endorse the points Julian has made on other threads about the importance of using primary rather than secondary sources. Please, please come to Brecon and read the surviving primary sources that we hold – it may (though I doubt it) for example, change your stance on the move of the 24th to Brecon.

My apologies to those of you who are already bored with this regularly repeated topic.

Bill

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Mr M. Cooper

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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:16 pm

Bill

I think that you should read your own post agian regarding the word 'mischievous'. You ended a sentence with the words "and not the result of "government meddling". FULL STOP. You then began another sentence saying, "Also the regiment is not "lost in Wales" - this is mischievous! Now to me, this implies that you are saying 'this is mischievous', to me saying 'lost in Wales'.

I did NOT say that the 'meddling idiot' was Cardwell. You know as well as I do that these reforms involved a complicated process with much debate between MANY OTHER PEOPLE including Childers, so please dont imply that I was calling Cardwell himself the 'meddling idiot'

It does not matter how many 'facts, figures and statistics' you wish to quote about the 24th regiment (to try to justify the government moving it to Wales), the fact of the matter is that the regiment had no connection whatsoever with Wales, it was raised in England, for the defence of England, and it had an English county title, therefor why uproot an established regiment to the south Wales border, when they could have simply amalgamated the 6th and 24th into 'The Warwickshire regiment'. The 43rd (Monmouthshire), was already there in the South Wales borders, so why move it to Oxfordshire in England?

I have mentioned the write up article posted recently by littlehand, if you read it, it will give you all you need to know about Endfield, Baker and the film, and also inform you about Bakers 'score to settle with the English'.

There were some figures posted recently by Julian, of the 123 men of the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment that fought at RD, the figures show that there were only 15 Welshmen there.

I did not misquote Ian, it was a mistake on my part, and if you look at my later post I said that I had missed out the word 'mostly'.

In 1881 the regimental numbers were ended, and new titles were ordered by the government. the 2nd Warwickshire regiments name was changed to the SWB, therefor any reference to the 24th foot as being anything other than the 2nd Warwickshire regiment is wrong.

No matter how many historians were involved in a remake of the film, the facts that they could not disagree on are that the regiment was NOT Welsh, and that the name of the 24th regiment of foot that fought in the zulu war at Isandlwana and RD was called the 2nd Warwickshire regiment and not the SWB.

It's very easy to write off history by a headed paper change, but let's not forget that before the headed paper change happened, the battle honours (including Isandlwana and Rorke's Drift) of the regiment belonged to the 24th regiment of foot, and no other, those changed names that followed, ie; SWB, RRW, RW only inherited those battle honours, the honours themselves belong to the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment of foot.

You are right Bill, regardless of 'facts, figures or statistics', I will never change my stance on (what I see) as the sillyness of uprooting and moving an established regiment from Monmouthshire in the south Wales border, to Oxfordshire in England, and uprooting and moving an established regiment from Warwickshire in England to the south Wales border. The government of the day would have done a lot better if they had shown some common sense and kept a south Wales border regiment in the south Wales border, and kept an English county titled regiment in England, as moving them just does not make any sense.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:31 pm

Martin, feelings on army reform and the losing/amalgamating of regiments are unerstandable to an extent, but yours are completely disproportionate to all but the most picky and finickity of desk-driving administrators, more concerned with what the army terms "BS" than the care and welfare of human resources and people management.
I understand to an extent, your feelings and those of proud Blackwatch men and Highlanders etc who have seen their regiments disappear.
But the important and really serious issues that we should be up in arms about today, are the lack of funding and proper support for injured sevicemen, the closing of Military and Naval hospitals and the farming out of injured soldiers to civilian services. The lack of support for mentally ill, homeless, depressed and combat-fatigued soldiers.


Bill Cainan Salute
I think all your posts are crystal clear, well thought through and on the mark. Salute
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:54 pm

tasker

Yes, I totally respect and fully agree with what you say on the important and really serious issues. Being a member of The Royal British Legion, I can assure you that we collect money and try to give as much support as we can to these ex servicemen. I also contribute to the Help the Heroes campaign and wear my badge with pride (as I do my poppy), to my mind, these brave lads will NEVER be forgotten.

I have a deep respect for all of them. Salute
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 7:12 pm

Well said Martin.

The generosity of the RBL, Help for Heroes charity, Haig Fund and the great British public is legendary and it never cease to amaze.

However, it is a national disgrace that charity has to fill and make up the shortfall that various British governments have penny-pinched from the armed forces and elsewhere.
Charities, injured service personnel and the general public, nurses, teachers, bin men, hospital laundry workers (who have also had their pockets picked by this particular government) in terms of pay freezes, paying more for their pensions, working longer and getting less, are being expected by this government, to pay off the missing money in the country's finances that has been stolen by City bankers.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 8:21 pm

Martin, yes i think you did hit the nail on the head Salute
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 9:06 pm

This was a very good discussion. Good to see members standing their ground throughout and come together at the end. Salute
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PostSubject: Memorial to the men of the 2nd 24th Regt.   Fri Jan 27, 2012 10:59 pm

Hi Martin / Bill.
Very well debated between the two of you , the only thing missing was the ' Pistols at 10 paces ' . Good to see you can still have a chat afterward . Martin you should take Bill up on his generous offer and head off to Brecon , god knows I'd be there in a flash !
Bill if I get to the UK again , I'll surely be contacting you . Salute Salute .
cheers 90th. You need to study mo
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:11 pm

tasker

Well, it looks like we have found something that we both agree on. Salute

Since I came out of the Army, I have been an active member of the RBL. They help with all sorts of problems, they even try to help you with the awful pictures that you see from time to time in your minds eye, they are very supportive.

Thanks also to Towerboy and littlehand for your comments, much appreciated.

I think that tasker and I, and hopefully also my friend Bill, can now come to some sort of agreement about all this, as it does seem rather pointless arguing about something that none of us can now alter, and as tasker rightly said, there are more importand and really serious issues that are a lot more relevant in todays world.

Martin. Salute
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:20 pm

Hi 90th

Thanks for the comments, and yes, I did have a laugh at the 'pistols at ten paces', nice one mate. :lol:

Bill is a good sport, and I would really like to meet him at the museum in Brecon, but I have explained to him in a pm, that there are a few problems about getting there, accommodation, etc, but I will have to try and get down there to see him and shake him by the hand (although he might want to shake me by the neck), :lol:

Martin. Salute
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Sat Jan 28, 2012 9:13 am

Well said Martin. Thanks to Bill Cainan for his valuable time in contributing and also to everyone else who has posted helpful and original thoughts and comments.
I think we all know each other's views by now and that no one is going to change their minds over certain minor points, so perhaps a line really can be drawn under this long running debate/argument?!?!
Obviously, points of FACT may arise in the future. For example, there are still a number of new members who join up thinking that the 24th in 1879 were titled the SWB and not the 2nd Warwickshires, so will need to be corrected and I am sure Martin will beat most people in doing that!
However, I do hope that derogatory, unfounded and disrespectful theories regarding Sir Stanley Baker, the, great, great, British film maker which are unfounded in fact and disrespectful, will be put out to grass. No factual evidence.
Nationalities of the combatants, as we have seen are too difficult to establish, and it has proved impossible even to define what the word "nationality" means. Hence it is unarguable!
We will never know for certain or be able to prove what each combatant's nationality was, without actually asking them. Obviously, we can't. Like the other personal details (places of birth, addresses, service details, pay books and muster rolls) of the vast majority of the brave men of the 24th in Zululand in 1879, as anyone knows who has tried to research these lads, sadly and tragically, all that remains of them in history is their name and number.
We can be sure of this though. They all laughed, joked, fought, bled and died together bravely, British, Irish and some even from overseas. Each one a legendary name that will never be forgotten.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Sun Jan 29, 2012 11:07 pm

"The South Wales Borderers was an infantry regiment of the British Army. It first came into existence, as the 24th Regiment of Foot, in 1689, but was not called the South Wales Borderers until 1881. The regiment served in a great many conflicts, including the American Revolutionary War, various conflicts in India, the Zulu War, Boer War, and World War I and II. The regiment was absorbed into the Royal Regiment of Wales in 1969.

24th Regiment of Foot
Soldier of 24th Regiment of Foot A.D. 1742
Plaque 24th Regiment of Foot in Quebec, CanadaThe regiment was formed as Sir Edward Dering's Regiment of Foot in 1689, becoming known, like other regiments, by the names of its subsequent colonels. It became the 24th Regiment of Foot in 1751, having been deemed 24th in the infantry order of precedence since 1747. In 1782 it became the 24th (The 2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot. The 1st Warwickshires were the 6th (1st Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot.

In 1741, during the War of Jenkin's Ear, the regiment was part of the amphibious expedition to the Caribbean and participated in the disastrous British defeat at the battle of Cartagena de Indias.

In 1756, during the Seven Years War, the regiment was part of the garrison on Minorca and surrendered to the French on June 28.

In 1758, during the Seven Years War, the regiment was part of the amphibious expedition against, or descent on, the coast of France and participated in the disastrous British defeat at the battle of Saint Cast.

In 1776 the regiment was sent to Quebec where it subsequently fought American rebels who had invaded the province during their War of Independence. The regiment was part of the 5,000 British and Hessian force, under the command of Gen. John Burgoyne, that surrendered to the American rebels in the 1777 Saratoga Campaign and remained imprisoned until 1783.

In 1804 a 2nd Battalion was raised but its life was relatively short when it was disbanded in 1814, having seen service in the Peninsular War.

In 1810 the vast majority of the 1st Battalion was captured at sea by the French; they were released the following year. They had been on the East Indiamen Astell, Ceylon and Windham when a French frigate squadron captured the last two at the Action of 3 July 1810 near the Comoros Islands.

In 1814 the 1st Battalion took part in The Gurkha War, which saw the British and the Gurkhas gain mutual respect. After the war, the British began recruiting Gurkhas,who became part of the British Indian Army. When India became independent in 1947, four Gurkha regiments transferred to the British Army.

On 23 July 1829, after a brief period in Lancashire preparing for their third trip to North America, the 1st Battalion departed Manchester by canal boat arriving at Paddington four days later. During the tedious nine weeks crossing the Atlantic, the Regiment's Colonel, Sir David Baird died.

In October 1829 the Regiment began a twelve year sojourn in Upper and Lower Canada. It participated in the suppression of an insurgency in the valley of the Richelieu River at the end of 1837 and the suppression of the Rebellion of 1838 in the Montreal area.

When ordered home to Britain in June 1841 it left almost 200 men behind as voluntary reinforcements for other regiments in Canada. This was in addition to hundreds of men who had deserted in the previous twelve years... 111 deserters in the years 1837 and 1838 alone.[1]

[edit] Second Sikh War and Indian MutinyThe regiment was back on the Indian subcontinent in 1846 where it took part in the Second Sikh War. At the Battle of Chillianwala, due to mismanagement by senior officers, the regiment suffered over 50 per cent casualties. The Queen's colours were lost (although the Sikhs never claimed to have captured them, so they were probably destroyed, or buried with those who had carried them.)

The regiment remained in India. In 1857, on the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, it was part of the garrison of the Punjab. It took part in the disarming of several units of the Bengal Army of the British East India Company and the pursuit of escaped mutineers, but was not involved in the major engagements of the subsequent war.

In 1858 the 2nd Battalion was re-formed at Sheffield.

In 1860 the 2nd Battalion was sent to the Mauritius where it spent 5 years, after which it left for Burma and then to the Andaman Islands in 1867. Two years later it was based on the Indian mainland. It returned home in 1872 and would remain there until war broke out in Southern Africa in 1878.

In 1866 the 1st Battalion was sent to Malta and then, remaining in the Mediterranean, moved to Gibraltar in 1872.

[edit] Zulu War[edit] IsandlhwanaIn 1875 the 1st Battalion arrived in Southern Africa and subsequently saw service, along with the 2nd Battalion, in the 9th Xhosa War in 1878.

In 1879 both battalions took part in the Zulu War, begun after a British invasion of Zululand, ruled by Cetshwayo. The 24th Foot took part in the crossing of the Buffalo River on 11 January, entering Zululand. The first engagement (and the most disastrous for the British) came at Isandhlwana. The British had pitched camp at Isandhlwana and not established any fortifications due to the sheer size of the force, the hard ground and a shortage of entrenching tools. The 24th Foot provided most of the British force and when the overall commander, Lord Chelmsford, split his forces on 22 January to search for the Zulus, the 1st Battalion (5 companies) and a company of the 2nd Battalion were left behind to guard the camp, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pulleine (CO of the 1/24th Foot).

The Zulus, 22,000 strong, attacked the camp and their sheer numbers overwhelmed the British. During the battle Lieutenant-Colonel Pulleine ordered Lieutenants Coghill and Melvill to save the Queen's Colour—the Regimental Colour was located at Helpmakaar with G Company. The two Lieutenants attempted to escape by crossing the Buffalo River where the Colour fell and was lost downstream, later being recovered. Both officers were killed. At this time the Victoria Cross (VC) was not awarded posthumously. This changed in the early 1900s when both Lieutenants were awarded posthumous Victoria Crosses for their bravery. The 2nd Battalion lost both its Colours at Isandhlwana though parts of the Colours—the crown, the pike and a colour case—were retrieved and trooped when the battalion was presented with new Colours in 1880.

The 24th had performed with distinction during the battle. The last survivors made their way to the foot of a mountain where they fought until they expended all their ammunition and were killed. The 24th Foot suffered 540 dead, including the 1st Battalion's commanding officer.

[edit] Rorke's Drift
The overwhelming Zulu attack on Rorke's Drift.After the battle, some 4,000 to 5,000 Zulus headed for Rorke's Drift, a small missionary post garrisoned by a company of the 2/24th Foot, native levies and others under the command of Lieutenant Chard, Royal Engineers, the most senior officer of the 24th present being Lieutenant Gonville Bromhead. Two Boer cavalry officers, Lieutenants Adendorff and Vane, arrived to inform the garrison of the defeat at Isandhlwana. The Acting Assistant Commissary James Langley Dalton persuaded Bromhead and Chard to stay and the small garrison frantically prepared rudimentary fortifications.

The Zulus first attacked at 4:30 pm. Throughout the day the garrison was attacked from all sides, including rifle fire from the heights above the garrison, and bitter hand-to-hand fighting often ensued. At one point the Zulus entered the hospital, which was stoutly defended by the wounded inside until it was set alight and eventually burnt down. The battle raged on into the early hours of 23 January but by dawn the Zulu Army had withdrawn. Lord Chelmsford and a column of British troops arrived soon afterwards. The garrison had suffered 15 killed during the battle (two died later) and 11 defenders were awarded the Victoria Cross for their distinguished defence of the post, 7 going to soldiers of the 24th Foot.

The stand at Rorke's Drift was immortalised in the 1964 movie Zulu.

[edit] Garrison Duties and Boer WarAfter the Cardwell-Childers Reforms of the British Armed Forces, the 24th Foot became the South Wales Borderers on 1 July 1881. The regiment's regimental depot had been moved to Brecon in Wales in 1873 and this, understandably, led to the regiment having close links with South Wales. The South Wales Borderers became the county regiment of Brecknockshire, Cardiganshire, Monmouthshire, Montgomeryshire, and Radnorshire.

1st Battalion

In 1893 the 1st Battalion arrived in Egypt and after a two-year stay there moved to Gibraltar. The battalion moved back to the east when it joined the British garrison in India in 1897. As with most British battalions posted to India, it was a lengthy stay, not leaving until 1910. It was based in Britain when the First World War began.

2nd Battalion

In 1880 the 2nd Battalion, after a brief stay in Gibraltar where they were presented with new Colours, arrived in India.

In 1886 the 2nd Battalion took part in the Third Burmese War that culminated in the annexation of Upper Burma by the British Empire, formally ending Burmese independence. It returned home in 1892.

The 2nd Battalion arrived in Cape Colony in 1900 to take part in the Boer War that had begun in 1899. The Regiment, additionally, had a number of companies from its Volunteer battalions sent to South Africa. The Boer War ended in 1902.

In 1910 the 2nd Battalion returned to a more peaceful South Africa. It was sent to the Far East in 1912, based in the British-controlled part of Tientsin in China where it remained until the outbreak of World War I.

[edit] First World War[edit] Western FrontThe 1st Battalion was part of the original British Expeditionary Force (BEF) that was sent to France shortly after war was declared.

In March 1916 the 2nd Battalion arrived into the carnage of the Western Front in France.

Welsh poet and language activist Saunders Lewis served in the South Wales Borderers during Wold War I.

[edit] Middle East and Other TheatresThe 2nd Battalion provided the only British contribution, a symbolic one, to the Japanese invasion of Tsingtao -- a German naval base in China that was the base of the East Asiatic Squadron. Shortly after the capture of Tsingtao, the battalion arrived in Hong Kong and then back home in January 1915.

As part of the 29th Division, the battalion took part in the Dardanelles Campaign, landing at S Beach, Cape Helles on 25 April 1915. Unlike other beaches, the 2nd South Wales Borderers, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel H.G. Casson, met little opposition and the landing, supported by the battleship HMS Cornwallis, was completed by 7:30am.

[edit] Inter-War1st Battalion

The end of war gave the 1st South Wales Borderers no respite. The battalion moved to Dunshaughlin in 1919 where it was part of the British Army during the Irish War of Independence. They were involved in operations against Michael Collins and the Irish Republican Army. After the Anglo-Irish Treaty established the Irish Free State, the Battalion was evacuated.

In 1928 the 1st Battalion arrived in Egypt where they remained until they were posted to Hong Kong in 1930. In 1934 the 1st Battalion was, once more, posted to India, based in Rawalpindi.

The battalion was sent, for a brief time, to Iraq in 1937, a rare deployment for a British Army unit, Iraq being under Royal Air Force administration. It returned to India the following year where it took part in operations against hostile tribes in the volatile North-West Frontier. It was still in India when World War II began in 1939.

2nd Battalion

In 1919 the 2nd Battalion arrived at Barrackpore, India. It remained there, based in a variety of places, for many years, until it was posted to Aden (now part of the Yemen) in 1927 where it remained until returning to Britain in 1929.

The battalion was back in the Middle East in 1936 when it was sent to Palestine to assist in quelling a rebellion by Arabs. The battalion left in December, moving Northern Ireland. It was still based in the UK when World War II began.

[edit] Second World War[edit] North-West EuropeThe 2nd Battalion, as part of 24th Guards Brigade (Rupertforce), took part in the Norwegian campaign, fighting the Nazi German invaders.

In 1944 the 2nd Battalion had the distinction of being the only Welsh battalion to take part in the Normandy Landings landing under command of 50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division. It was under command of 7th Armoured Division for a few days in June 1944, reverting to 50th (Northumbrian Division). In August 1944 it was briefly under command of 59th (Staffordshire) Division and on August 20 joined 49th Infantry Division. It ended its war in Germany, and remained there, as part of the occupation forces, until 1948 when it returned home.

[edit] Africa and the Middle EastThe 1st Battalion, as part of the Indian 10th Infantry Division, was sent to Iraq to quell a German-inspired uprising in Iraq. The battalion saw subsequent service in Iran.

The 1st Battalion sustained enormous casualties in Libya near Tobruk when they lost around 500 officers and men captured or killed during a general retreat. The battalion found itself cut off when the German forces outflanked them, the commanding officer, Lt. Col. F.R.G. Matthews, decided to attempt to escape around the enemy and break through to British lines. It turned into a disaster with only four officers and around one hundred men reaching Sollum. To the surprise of the survivors the battalion was ordered to disband in Cyprus and the remnants of the battalion were transferred, with the exception of a cadre that returned to the UK, to the 1st Battalion, The King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster). A few months later the battalion was re-formed from the cadre and the 4th Battalion, The Monmouthshire Regiment though it would remain in the United Kingdom for the duration of the war".

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Sun Jan 29, 2012 11:16 pm

The Cardwell Reforms: pre 1881 and post 1881 infantry unit titles

The first table shows the pre 1881 infantry unit titles and the titles of the post 1881 infantry units they became: The second table shows the post 1881 infatry unit titles and the titles of the infantry units they were formed from.

Pre 1881
Post 1881

1st The Royal Scots Regiment
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)

2nd (The Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment)

3rd (The East Kent) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

4th (The King's Own Royal) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment)

5th Regiment of Foot (Northumberland Fusiliers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Northumberland Fusiliers

6th (Royal 1st Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Warwickshire Regiment

7th Regiment of Foot (Royal Fusiliers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)

8th (The King's) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The King's Regiment (Liverpool)

9th (The East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Norfolk Regiment

10th (The North Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Lincolnshire Regiment

11th (The North Devonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Devonshire Regiment

12th (The East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Suffolk Regiment

13th (1st Somersetshire) (Prince Albert's Light Infantry) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, Prince Albert's (Somersetshire Light Infantry)

14th (Buckinghamshire - The Prince of Wales's Own) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)

15th (The Yorkshire East Riding) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The East Yorkshire Regiment

16th (The Bedfordshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Bedfordshire Regiment

17th (The Leicestershire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Leicestershire Regiment

18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Irish Regiment

19th (The 1st Yorkshire North Riding - Princess of Wales's Own) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment)

20th (The East Devonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Lancashire Fusiliers

21st (Royal Scots Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Scots Fusiliers

22nd (The Cheshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Cheshire Regiment

23rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Welsh Fusiliers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Welsh Fusiliers

24th (The 2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The South Wales Borderers

25th (The York) Regiment of Foot (King's Own Borderers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The King's Own Borderers

26th (The Cameronian) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

28th (The North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment

29th (The Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Worcestershire Regiment

30th (The Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The East Lancashire Regiment

31st (The Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The East Surrey Regiment

32nd (The Cornwall) Regiment Foot (Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

33rd (The Duke of Wellington's) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

34th (The Cumberland) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Border Regiment

35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Royal Sussex Regiment

36th (The Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Worcestershire Regiment

37th (The North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Hampshire Regiment

38th (The 1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment

39th (The Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Dorsetshire Regiment

40th (The 2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Volunteers Regiment (South Lancashire Regiment)

41st (The Welsh) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Welsh Regiment

42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot, The Black Watch
1st Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Oxfordshire Light Infantry

44th (The East Essex) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Essex Regiment

45th (Nottinghamshire) (Sherwood Foresters) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Sherwood Foresters (Derbyshire Regiment)

46th (The South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry

47th (The Lancashire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

48th (The Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment

49th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) (or The Hertfordshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Berkshire Regiment)

50th (The Queen's Own) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

51st (The 2nd Yorkshire West Riding) or The King's Own Light Infantry Regiment
1st Battalion, The King's Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment)

52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Oxfordshire Light Infantry

53rd (The Shropshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The King's Light Infantry (Shropshire Regiment)

54th (The West Norfolk) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Dorsetshire Regiment

55th (The Westmoreland) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Border Regiment

56th (The West Essex) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Essex Regiment

57th (The West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment)

58th (The Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment

59th (2nd Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The East Lancashire Regiment

60th (The King's Royal Rifle Corps) Regiment of Foot
1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, The King's Royal Rifle Corps

61st (The South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment

62nd (The Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment)

63rd (The West Suffolk) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Manchester Regiment

64th (2nd Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment)

65th (The 2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The York and Lancaster Regiment

66th (The Berkshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Berkshire Regiment)

67th (The South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Hampshire Regiment

68th (Durham) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry

69th (The South Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Welsh Regiment

70th (The Surrey) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The East Surrey Regiment

71st (Highland) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry

72nd (or Duke of Albany's Own Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs)

73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

74th (Highland) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry

75th (Stirlingshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Gordon Highlanders

76th Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

77th (The East Middlesex) Regiment of Foot (The Duke of Cambridge's Own)
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment)

78th (Highlanders) Regiment of Foot (or The Ross-shire Buffs)
2nd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs)

79th (The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders

80th Regiment of Foot (Staffordshire Volunteers)
2nd Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment

81st Regiment of Foot (Loyal Lincoln Volunteers)
2nd Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment

82nd Regiment of Foot (Prince of Wales's Volunteers)
2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Volunteers Regiment (South Lancashire Regiment)

83rd (County of Dublin) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles

84th (York and Lancaster) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The York and Lancaster Regiment

85th, or The King's Regiment of Light Infantry (Bucks Volunteers)
2nd Battalion, The King's Light Infantry (Shropshire Regiment)

86th (Royal County Down) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles

87th (or Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers)

88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers)
1st Battalion, The Connaught Rangers

89th (The Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers)

90th Regiment of Foot (Perthshire Volunteers) (Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles)

91st (Princess Louise's Argyllshire Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, Princess Louise's (Sutherland and Argyll Highlanders)

92nd (Gordon Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Gordon Highlanders

93rd (Sutherland Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, Princess Louise's (Sutherland and Argyll Highlanders)

94th Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Connaught Rangers

95th (Derbyshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Sherwood Foresters (Derbyshire Regiment)

96th Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Manchester Regiment

97th (The Earl of Ulster's) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)

98th (The Prince of Wales's) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment)

99th Duke of Edinburgh's (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment)

100th (or Prince of Wales's Royal Canadian) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians)

101st Regiment of Foot (Royal Bengal Fusiliers)
1st Battalion, The Royal Munster Fusiliers

102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers)
1st Battalion, The Royal Dublin Fusiliers

103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Dublin Fusiliers

104th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Fusiliers)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Munster Fusiliers

105th Regiment of Foot (Madras Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The King's Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment)

106th Regiment of Foot (Bombay Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry

107th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Sussex Regiment

108th Regiment of Foot (Madras Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers

109th Regiment of Foot (Bombay Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians)

The Prince Consort's Own Rifle Brigade
1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, The Prince Consort's Own (Rifle Brigade)



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Post 1881
Pre 1881

1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) 1st The Royal Scots Regiment
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment) 2nd (The Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) 3rd (The East Kent) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The King's Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) 4th (The King's Own Royal) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Northumberland Fusiliers 5th Regiment of Foot (Northumberland Fusiliers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Warwickshire Regiment 6th (Royal 1st Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) 7th Regiment of Foot (Royal Fusiliers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The King's Regiment (Liverpool) 8th (The King's) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Norfolk Regiment 9th (The East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Lincolnshire Regiment 10th (The North Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Devonshire Regiment 11th (The North Devonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Suffolk Regiment 12th (The East Suffolk) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, Prince Albert's (Somersetshire Light Infantry) 13th (1st Somersetshire) (Prince Albert's Light Infantry) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) 14th (Buckinghamshire - The Prince of Wales's Own) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The East Yorkshire Regiment 15th (The Yorkshire East Riding) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Bedfordshire Regiment 16th (The Bedfordshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Leicestershire Regiment 17th (The Leicestershire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Irish Regiment 18th (The Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment) 19th (The 1st Yorkshire North Riding - Princess of Wales's Own) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Lancashire Fusiliers 20th (The East Devonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Scots Fusiliers 21st (Royal Scots Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Cheshire Regiment 22nd (The Cheshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The Royal Welsh Fusiliers 23rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Welsh Fusiliers)
1st and 2nd Battalions, The South Wales Borderers 24th (The 2nd Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot
1st and 2nd Battalions, The King's Own Borderers 25th (The York) Regiment of Foot (King's Own Borderers)
1st Battalion, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 26th (The Cameronian) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 90th Regiment of Foot (Perthshire Volunteers) (Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 108th Regiment of Foot (Madras Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment 28th (The North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment 61st (The South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Worcestershire Regiment 29th (The Worcestershire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Worcestershire Regiment 36th (The Herefordshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The East Lancashire Regiment 30th (The Cambridgeshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The East Lancashire Regiment 59th (2nd Nottinghamshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The East Surrey Regiment 31st (The Huntingdonshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The East Surrey Regiment 70th (The Surrey) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 32nd (The Cornwall) Regiment Foot (Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 46th (The South Devonshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) 33rd (The Duke of Wellington's) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) 76th Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Border Regiment 34th (The Cumberland) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Border Regiment 55th (The Westmoreland) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Royal Sussex Regiment 35th (Royal Sussex) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Royal Sussex Regiment 107th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Hampshire Regiment 37th (The North Hampshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Hampshire Regiment 67th (The South Hampshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment 38th (The 1st Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The South Staffordshire Regiment 80th Regiment of Foot (Staffordshire Volunteers)
1st Battalion, The Dorsetshire Regiment 39th (The Dorsetshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Dorsetshire Regiment 54th (The West Norfolk) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Volunteers Regiment (South Lancashire Regiment) 40th (The 2nd Somersetshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Volunteers Regiment (South Lancashire Regiment) 82nd Regiment of Foot (Prince of Wales's Volunteers)
1st Battalion, The Welsh Regiment 41st (The Welsh) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Welsh Regiment 69th (The South Lincolnshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) 42nd (Royal Highland) Regiment of Foot, The Black Watch
2nd Battalion, The Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) 73rd (Perthshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Oxfordshire Light Infantry 52nd (Oxfordshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Oxfordshire Light Infantry 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Essex Regiment 44th (The East Essex) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Essex Regiment 56th (The West Essex) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Sherwood Foresters (Derbyshire Regiment) 45th (Nottinghamshire) (Sherwood Foresters) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Sherwood Foresters (Derbyshire Regiment) 95th (Derbyshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 47th (The Lancashire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment 81st Regiment of Foot (Loyal Lincoln Volunteers)
1st Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment 48th (The Northamptonshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Northamptonshire Regiment 58th (The Rutlandshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Berkshire Regiment) 49th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) (or The Hertfordshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Berkshire Regiment) 66th (The Berkshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) 50th (The Queen's Own) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) 97th (The Earl of Ulster's) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The King's Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment) 51st (The 2nd Yorkshire West Riding) or The King's Own Light Infantry Regiment
2nd Battalion, The King's Own Light Infantry (South Yorkshire Regiment) 105th Regiment of Foot (Madras Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The King's Light Infantry (Shropshire Regiment) 53rd (The Shropshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The King's Light Infantry (Shropshire Regiment) 85th, or The King's Regiment of Light Infantry (Bucks Volunteers)
1st Battalion, The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) 57th (The West Middlesex) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) 77th (The East Middlesex) Regiment of Foot (The Duke of Cambridge's Own)
1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, The King's Royal Rifle Corps 60th (The King's Royal Rifle Corps) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment) 62nd (The Wiltshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire Regiment) 99th Duke of Edinburgh's (Lanarkshire) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Manchester Regiment 63rd (The West Suffolk) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Manchester Regiment 96th Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment) 64th (2nd Staffordshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment) 98th (The Prince of Wales's) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The York and Lancaster Regiment 65th (The 2nd Yorkshire, North Riding) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The York and Lancaster Regiment 84th (York and Lancaster) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry 68th (Durham) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Durham Light Infantry 106th Regiment of Foot (Bombay Light Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry 71st (Highland) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry)
2nd Battalion, The Highland Light Infantry 74th (Highland) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs) 72nd (or Duke of Albany's Own Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-shire Buffs) 78th (Highlanders) Regiment of Foot (or The Ross-shire Buffs)
1st Battalion, The Gordon Highlanders 75th (Stirlingshire) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Gordon Highlanders 92nd (Gordon Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 79th (The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles 83rd (County of Dublin) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Royal Irish Rifles 86th (Royal County Down) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) 87th (or Royal Irish Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) 89th (The Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Connaught Rangers 88th Regiment of Foot (Connaught Rangers)
2nd Battalion, The Connaught Rangers 94th Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, Princess Louise's (Sutherland and Argyll Highlanders) 91st (Princess Louise's Argyllshire Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, Princess Louise's (Sutherland and Argyll Highlanders) 93rd (Sutherland Highlanders) Regiment of Foot
1st Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians) 100th (or Prince of Wales's Royal Canadian) Regiment of Foot
2nd Battalion, The Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiment (Royal Canadians) 109th Regiment of Foot (Bombay Infantry)
1st Battalion, The Royal Munster Fusiliers 101st Regiment of Foot (Royal Bengal Fusiliers)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Munster Fusiliers 104th Regiment of Foot (Bengal Fusiliers)
1st Battalion, The Royal Dublin Fusiliers 102nd Regiment of Foot (Royal Madras Fusiliers)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Dublin Fusiliers 103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers)
1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, The Prince Consort's Own (Rifle Brigade) The Prince Consort's Own Rifle Brigade
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Mr M. Cooper

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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Tue Jan 31, 2012 2:54 pm

Good post LH

Reading this, it would mean that reference to just 'the 24th' means the regiment between 1751-1782, and that anything after this date should read the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment, and then after July 1881 there should be no reference to numbers, ie; (24th), but only the new regimental name, as anything else would be wrong. Therefor any display of artifacts, or written notice, or indeed any mention of the regiment during the Anglo - Zulu War period should give the public the full title of the regiment, ie; the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment, and not just the 24th foot or regiment, as this would imply to mean the regiment pre 1782, and then of course after July 1881, only the new regiments names should follow with no numbers, ie; SWB, RRW, RW.

Very interesting post that LH, it does make me wonder how many articles, write ups, notices, adverts, artifacts, displays, etc, show the full and correct name of the regiment during the Anglo - Zulu war, not many I suppose. Suspect

Happen it's time for a browse on the net :lol:

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Tue Jan 31, 2012 6:35 pm

Martin, you are probably quite corrrect on that.
I reckon that most people write "24th" as a short hand way of writing "24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment" if referring to an event that regiment was involved in, in say 1879.
There is no intended attempt to mislead, I feel.
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Wed Feb 01, 2012 12:17 am

tasker, yes, I know what you mean. I did have a look on the net, and there are a lot of errors, some, as you say, with no attempt to mislead, whilst others seem rather dubious, and in some cases almost deliberate. I suppose that on discussion sites similar to this, people would just write 24th as a short hand way of the regiments full title, like you said. But what would be wrong though, are supposedly dedicated sites and other places that have displays and artifacts concerning the AZW, that avoid putting the full title of the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment, and just put 24th foot/regiment, I think that would be deliberately avoiding giving the public the full title of the regiment, and therefor mislead them by hiding the fact that the 24th was called the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:19 pm

Just to throw the spanner in the works (Martin) on Bromhead's head stone it reads.

"2nd Batts The South Wales Borderers 24th Regiment"

Martin dont get Mad
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Drummer Boy 14

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:24 pm

When he died that was what the regiment was called.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:37 pm

Good point DB
But as he won his VC at the Battle Of Rorke's Drift. Should it not say South Wales Borderers 24th Regiment. formerly 24th 2nd Warwickshire regiment"
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:38 pm

It was done by his fellow officers, it would have been expensive.
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impi

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:41 pm

So you agree but didn't happen because you say.

Quote :
it would have been expensive.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:47 pm

i wonder why there is no mentioned of RD on his head stone. To expensive i suppose.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:41 pm

Do we know who was responsible for properly restoring Bromhead's grave to its current state? That was very good of them.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:42 pm

impi wrote:
i wonder why there is no mentioned of RD on his head stone. To expensive i suppose.

It's a gravestone, not a biography!
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Chard1879

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 6:50 pm

Quote :
It's a gravestone, not a biography!
He's not asking for a biography. Just a reconition to acknowlebdge his part at RD. Just like nearly every other defender who took part.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 7:09 pm

Whilst John Chard's gravestone includes the inscription, "The Hero of Rorke's Drift", this would seem to be the exception, rather than the rule. The letters "V.C." after the deceased soldier's name is recognition in itself. To paraphrase another member of this forum, nuff said.
Having seen scores of WW1 and several other VC gravestones, with the exception of Chard's, I have yet to see another one where the specific action for which the VC was awarded, is referred to on the man's headstone.
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PostSubject: Memorial to men of the 2nd btn 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 7:42 pm

Hi impi

Yes, I am afraid that this sort of thing happens. For instance, the SWB were never the 24th foot/regiment, as the regimental numbers were discontinued in July 1881, the last infantry regiment to have the numbers 24th foot/regiment in their name/title, were the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment.

The name of his regiment when he won his V.C. was the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment, and not the SWB, so really the 24th (2nd Warwickshire) regiment is the name that should have been on his memorial (after the letters V.C.), followed by, (later called the SWB).

But if this was arranged by his fellow officers, then maybe they were not thinking clearly, and they just put SWB, as this was the regiments name at the time of his death.

Martin. Salute

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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:01 pm

Tasker suggest you look up some of the Grave Stones of the defenders on the forum. Hook would be a good one to start with.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:55 pm

Thanks Chard.
I make that 2.
Note however, that the memorial was erected by "admiring" civilians in 1906.
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PostSubject: Re: Memorial to men of the 2nd Btn 24th Regiment   Mon Feb 20, 2012 8:58 pm

Martin, check the link that Chard posted re Hook's epitaph.

It too refers to him as being of the 2nd Btn, SWB.

Obviously, gravestones carry the current name of the regiment to which the man belonged. (If previous names were included, then it could be a very long list of former regimental names!)
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