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 Robert Vacy Ash

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PostSubject: Robert Vacy Ash    Mon Jan 07, 2013 1:00 pm

Robert Vacy Ash was born on the 17th July 1845 at Stratton, Cornwall. He was the third son and fourth child of Robert Knott and Mary Ann Vacy. When he was born he was the third born son of the marriage, his elder brothers were Thomas and William, and he also had an older sister Mary Ann. At the time of his birth, his father’s occupation is listed as an Inn Keeper

On the census of 1851, aged five he was living at 62, The High Street, Stratton along with his parents, his two older brothers and an older sister. His fathers occupation is listed as Hotel Keeper

His sister Mary Ann died in 1857

On the census of 1861, aged 15 he was living in Paddington, London with an uncle and his brother William. William and Robert’s occupations are both listed as Medical Students. Meanwhile his mother Mary Ann Ash is now listed as a widow and continues to live in Stratton, Cornwall. Her occupation is listed as Inn Keeper in keeping with her carrying on the family business after the death of Robert’s father also Called Robert

Robert was admitted as a member of Royal College of Surgeons in London at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 24th Jul 1866, stated in the British Medical Journal of the 11th Aug 1866. He was also a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries, Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians and had an M.B. from the University of Aberdeen

His medical registration with the General Medical Council of the UK for 1867 states that he was living at Stratton, Cornwall

In an article in the British Medical Journal of the 3rd Feb 1868, Robert was a Medical Practitioner in Grantham where he reported on a case of Intussusception of the Rectum in a 6 year old child. Intussusception occurs when a portion of the bowel slides into the next, much like the pieces of a telescope. When this occurs, it can create a blockage in the bowel and can result in swelling, inflammation, and decreased blood flow to the part of the intestines involved. Robert describes the treatment of the child, death and the post-mortem he conducted

On the census of 1871, which is generally taken in early April, Robert, aged 25, is listed as being a boarder in the home of Sarah Richardson the widow of a Surgeon. They lived at Holyrood House, South Skirlaugh, Yorkshire. His occupation is listed as General Practitioner.

On the 30th September 1871 Robert joined the Army as an Assistant Surgeon which was announced in the London Gazette of the 8th Mar 1872. On the 1st Mar 1873 he was promoted to Surgeon

On the 6th Jul 1872 Robert was posted to the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa where he remained until the 18th Nov 1872. He spent a few months back in England before being posted back to the Cape of Good Hope on the 15th April 1873 where he remained until the 28th Mar 1875

Robert was then at home on leave from the 29th Mar to the 4th Jun 1875 before being posted back to the Cape of Good Hope on the 5th Jun 1875

Robert took part in the Zulu Campaign from 1878 - 1879

On the 15th Mar 1880 Robert returned home and on the 1881 census of England, Robert, aged 35, was in Quarters in the men's block at the Royal Victoria Military Hospital, Netley. His rank is listed as Surgeon

On the 12th Aug 1882 Robert sailed to Egypt as medical support for the Egyptian Campaign, including the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir

On the 11th Mar 1883 Robert returned home to England and on the 30th Sep 1883 he was promoted to Surgeon-Major

On the 7th July 1883 in the British Medical Journal, Robert discusses the causes of enteric fever (now known as typhoid fever) opening a debate for other medical professionals to respond

On the 21st July 1883 in the British Medical Journal, Robert discusses the possible causes of sea-sickness, a complaint from which he states that he suffers himself on his frequent travels by ship. He considers the sympathetic nervous system to be the cause of sea sickness and states his reasons for thinking this, again opening a debate for other medical professionals to respond

On the 11th Sep 1884 Robert married Eliza Maxwell, the daughter of Thomas Maxwell, a gentleman. Robert gives his occupation as physician and the marriage took place in St Barnabas Church, Kensington, London. At the time of the marriage Robert and Eliza were living at separate addresses in Warwick Gardens, Kensington

On the 18th Feb 1885 Robert sailed for the Bengal in India and took part in the Burmese Expedition of 1886-1887 where it is stated that:

‘’he was an officer of great ability and zeal, who has done most excellent service. Is highly qualified for the duties he has been called upon to perform’’ by DSS Turner PMO Burma

The British Medical Journal of the 12th Jan 1889 states that Robert and Eliza's second son was born on the 4th Jan 1889 at 38 Stanford Avenue, Brighton, Sussex. As Robert was stationed in India and Robert and Eliza’s second child was born in England, Eliza must have been with Robert in India and returned to England to give birth to their child. Sadly for the couple, this child was called Roland Colin Ash but sadly died in infancy

On the 28th Apr 1889 Robert returned home to England and from that date until the 17th Nov 1891 he is listed as being sick. The death of his child and marital difficulties which resulted in divorce may go some way to explain why Robert was listed as sick

On the 1891 census, Robert, aged 45, is living at a private address in Hove with his wife Eliza and son William who was born in Ayra Burgal, India and is five years old. Roberts rank is listed as Surgeon-Major. He was promoted to Lieutenant -Colonel on the 30th Sep 1891 and retired from the service on the 18th Nov 1891

During the period in which Robert was listed as being sick, the 1891 census was taken when Robert, aged 45, was living at a private address in Hove with his wife Eliza and son William who was born in Ayra Burgal, India and is five years old. Roberts rank is listed as Surgeon-Major.

He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel on the 30th Sep 1891 as per notification on his service record and the British Medical Journal of the 24th Oct 1891

Robert retired from the service on the 18th Nov 1891

His medical registration with the General Medical Council for the UK for 1899 states he was living at 10 The Esplanade, Fleetwood, Lancashire

On the 1901 census, Robert, aged 55, continues to live at 10 the Esplanade, Fleetwood, Lancashire with his cousin Thomas Lyle who is aged 62. They are both surgeons and living on their own incomes (retired)

His medical registration with the General Medical Council for the UK for 1903 states he was living at 10 The Esplanade, Fleetwood, Lancashire where he died on the 18th September 1903, aged 58

Robert's medal entitlement was the South Africa medal 1877-1879 no clasp, The Egypt medal 1882-1889 clasp Tel-El-Kebir, The India General Service Medal 1854 clasp Burma 1885-86 and the Khedive’s star 1882

Source:Royal Victoria Military Hospital
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PostSubject: Re: Robert Vacy Ash    Mon Jan 07, 2013 4:05 pm

Brigade-Surgeon Robert Vacy Ash

Robert Vacy Ash was a surgeon and he is entitled to medals South Africa medal 1877-79 (no clasp), Egypt medal (clasp Tel-El-Kebir), India general Service medal clasp Burma 1885-86 and the Khedive’s star 1882
Born on July 17th 1845 in Stratton Cornwall Father : Robert K. Ash    Occupation : Inn Keeper

House where Robert Vacy Ash was raised in his early years.

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Robert Vacy Ash was a surgeon and he is entitled to medals South Africa medal 1877-79 (no clasp), Egypt medal (clasp Tel-El-Kebir), India general Service medal clasp Burma 1885-86 and the Khedive’s star 1882
Born on July 17th 1845 in Stratton Cornwall Father : Robert K. Ash  Occupation : Inn Keeper

He was the third son and fourth child of Robert Knott and Mary Ann Vacy.  He was the third born son of the marriage, his elder brothers were Thomas and William,  and he also had an older sister Mary Ann.

1851 census United Kingdom : aged five Robert was living at 62, The High Street, Stratton along with his parents, his two older brothers and an older sister. His father’s occupation is listed as Hotel Keeper

1857 : His sister Mary Ann died.

1861 census : He is living in Paddington, London with an uncle and his brother William.  William and Robert’s occupations are both listed as Medical Students.  Meanwhile his mother Mary Ann Ash is now listed as a widow and continues to live in Stratton, Cornwall.  Her occupation is listed as Inn Keeper in keeping with her carrying on the family business after the death of his father.

March 15th, 1866 : He passed his examination at St-Mary’s Hospital (Medical Times and gazette p. 324 March 24, 1866)

July 24th: He was admitted as a member of Royal College of Surgeons in London at a meeting of the Court of Examiners on the 24th Jul 1866, stated in the British Medical Journal of the 11th Aug 1866.  He was also a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries, Licentiate of the Royal College of Physicians and had an M.B. from the University of Aberdeen

1867 : His medical registration with the General Medical Council of the UK for 1867 states that he was living at Stratton, Cornwall

April 2nd : Listed as an Assistant-Surgeon with the Royal South Lincoln Regiment since (Hart’s List 1868)

1868 : M.A. at Aberdeen university

February : Wrote an article in the British medical journal. At the time he was practising in the town of Grantham

1871 census United Kingdom : Boarder at Sarah Richardson home, she was a surgeon widow

It is presumed that he started the year in Truro.  His medical registration with the General Medical Council of the UK states that in 1871 he was living in Truro which is in Cornwall.

September 30th 1871: He joined the Army. He was appointed Assistant Surgeon (London Gazette 8th Mar 1872) and stationed at Cape of Good Hope (Hart’s List of 1871)

1872 : Service in Dover, Kent

July 6th : Posted to the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa.

November 18th, 1872 : Back in England

early 1873 : Service in Newhaven March 1st : Appointed surgeon

April 15th :  Posted to the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa until 1875

March 29th 1875 to June 4th : Went back to UK on leave

June 5th : Posted back to Cape of Good Hope South Africa

1879 : Served in the Zulu war against the Seknkuni. He stayed on the Natal side of the Tugela river and did not cross into fighting territory

March 15th, 1880 : Returned to England. Service at Netley Hospital

1881 census United Kingdom : Unmarried and living in Quarters in the men block at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley, Hampshire. His rank is listed as Surgeon

September 2nd 1882 Excerpt from the British journal of medicine “On Friday, August 11th, No. 2 Bearer Company embarked on board the City of Paris, en route to Egypt. with Surgeons Vacy Ash and 143 rank and file of the Army Hospital Corps. Officers of the No. 2 Bearer company then moved to Kassassin on the ship Carthage according to the book History of the medical department Tome II. Before the battle of Tel-el-Kebir (September 13th), the No. 2 Bearer company was attached to the 2nd Division. They would later occupy the city on Benha and Tanta with the 2nd Division.“

The No. 2 Bearer company was mentioned as having poor discipline amongst its staff

He also served with the Dragoon Guards

December 16th 1882 Excerpt from the British Journal of Medicine “We learn from Cairo that under the Gazette of November 17th, containing the lists of honours and promotions among the army medical officers who had been serving during the campaign, reached that city one omission gave rise to considerable comment. The promotions in the army medical ranks included two of each grade on service in Egypt, and generally the two seniors were selected for advancement. In the rank of surgeon, however, the senior, Dr. Vacy Ash, was passed over by two surgeons junior to him in the list. We are informed that Dr. Ash is a surgeon who has always had a high reputation during his eleven years’ service in the department, and that he was particularly noticed for his zeal and activity in the Zulu campaign in South Africa. When sent to Egypt, he was attached to one of the bearer companies, but was removed from this service to be placed in medical charge of the 7th Dragoon Guards, who were then suffering from enteric fever to an alarming extent. Dr. Ash still remains with this regiment, and as he has secured the good feeling and gratitude of both the officers and men of the corps, and at the same time has received an expression of approbation for his professional services from the head of his own department in Egypt, his supercession by his juniors has attracted all the more attention. What the explanation of, the occurrence may be, remains to be seen.“

Surgeon Vacy Ash, Army Medical Department, has been specially detailed to enquire into this matter; (the epidemic of enteric fever at the Base Hospital at Abbassayah)and his reports, which are now in the hands of the General Officer Commanding, may lead to a clearing up of this mystery.

July 1883 : His findings on epidemic of the enteric fever are published in the British Medical Journal. He also publish his findings on sea-sickness in the July British Medical Journal

March 11th, 1883 : Returned home to England. Service in Portland, Dorset

April 11th : His Egypt medal was issued to him on that date

September 30th : Appointed surgeon-major

November 11th, 1884 : Married Eliza Maxwell in St-Barnabas Church, Kensington, Middlesex. She was born in 1863,  21 years old the daughter of Thomas Maxwell, a gentleman.  Robert gives his occupation as physician. At the time of the marriage Robert and Eliza were living at separate addresses in Warwick Gardens, Kensington

February 18th, 1885 : Service in Bengal and Burma. During that campaign comments made by his superior officer DSS Turner PMO Burma ‘’he was an officer of great ability and zeal, who has done most excellent service.  Is highly qualified for the duties he has been called upon to perform’’

November 20th 1886 Excerpt from the British Journal of Medicine “Surgeon-Major R. VACY ASH, M.D., has been ordered to Mandalay for service in Upper Burmah. He is appointed Assistant Medical Officer and Sanitary Officer to the Barmah Field Force, and will also take medical charge of the Headquarters Etaff.“

1887 : Served in the Burmanese expedition

September 2nd: Mentioned in dispatches London Gazette

1888 : Service in Brighton until 1891

January 4th, 1889 : Birth of his second child Roland Colin Vacy Ash, born February at 38 Stanford Avenue, Brighton, Sussex.- died September) from the British Medical Journal of the 12th Jan 1889. As Robert was stationed in India and Robert and Eliza’s second child was born in England, Eliza must have been with Robert in India and returned to England to give birth to their child.

28th April : He returned home to England and from that date until the 17th Nov 1891 he is listed as being sick.  The death of his child and marital difficulties which resulted in divorce may go some way to explain why Robert was listed as sick.

1891 census United Kingdom census taken in Hove Sussex county  Wife: Eliza born 1865 in Spratton South Africa,

Son: William Maxwell Vacy born July 6th, 1885 in Ayra Burgal, India

July : His wife petitioned for her divorce. She accused him of adultery and verbal abuse. He was found not guilty of those charges.

September 30th : Appointed lieutenant-colonel (brigade surgeon) .(from the British British Medical Journal October 17th, 1891), … who shortly retires from the service, was entertained at a farewell dinner at the Hotel Metropole on October 12th by the officers of the Medical Staff serving at Brighton

November 18th : Retiring from service

August 9th, 1898 : Lieutenant colonel under London Gazette notification

September 25th 1899 : Transfer of mortgage of Leworthy Robert Vacy Ash of Fleetwood, co. Lancs, surgeon lieut. col. (retired) and Arthur John Kingdon of 30 Milk Street, Cheapside, London, gent. (co-executors of Ann Fry) To Francis John Oliver of 44 Cleveland Road, Stanford Avenue, Brighton, gent.

His medical registration with the General Medical Council for the UK for 1899 states he was living at 10 The Esplanade, Fleetwood, Lancashire

March 31st, 1901 (census) : He was a surgeon physician at his own account living at 10 Esplanade, Fleetwod. He was living with his cousin Thomas Hyler (physician). They had two domestic servant, Sarah Foster and Margaret Connelly. His son William was a student at Magdalen College

- His wife was visiting Mary Hooley (probably her sister) at 69th Belmont road, Portswood.

July 1901 : He petitioned for his divorce accusing his wife of adultery. She was found guilty and condemned to pay him a sum of money £1750


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Picture of Dr Ash (1901)

March 1902 (first semester) : Married for the 2nd time in St George Hanover Square with Florence May Bratt.
September 18th, 1903 : Died suddenly at Morecambe, Lancashire. He was still employed on the retired List at Fleetwood.

September 21st, 1910 : His second wife remarried to a William Bottomley at St John’s Church Hartford, Cheshire, United Kingdom.


Source:Camc word press
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PostSubject: Re: Robert Vacy Ash    Thu Apr 11, 2013 12:43 am

Surgeon-Lieutenant-Colonel ROBEIRT VACY ASH, M.D., died at Morecambe Lancashire. on September 18th, aged 58 years. suddenly. He was appointed Assistant-Surgeon, September 30th, 1871 Surgeon, March 1st, I873; Surgeon-Major, September 30th, 1883; and Lieutenant-Colonel, Septembel 30th, 1891; retiring from the service, November 18th, 189I. He was in tlhe Zulu war in I879 (medal): in the Egyptian war in 1882, including the battle of Tel-el-Kebir (medal with clasp and Klhedive's bronze star); and with the Burmese expedition in I886-7 (mentioned in dispatclles, medal with clasp).
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PostSubject: Robert Vacy Ash    Thu Apr 11, 2013 8:48 am

R.V.Ashe didnt take part in the actual Zulu War , but did take part during the Sekukuni Campaign of 79 , entitling Ashe to the same medal although it was unclapsed . Littlehand , Ray63's post prior to yours lists in detail his record of service .
Cheers 90th.
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