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 Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley

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PostSubject: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Mon Jul 13, 2009 11:05 pm

Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley Died 25 March 1913 Buried St Paul's Cathedral

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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Thu Jan 28, 2010 10:49 pm

Garnet Joseph Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley of Cairo, ( June 4, 1833 - March 26, 1913) was a British field marshal. He served in Burma, the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny, China, Canada, and widely in Africa - including his brilliantly executed Ashanti campaign (1873-74).

He was the eldest son of Major Garnet Joseph Wolseley of the King's Own Borderers (25th Foot.), he was born at Golden Bridge, Co. Dublin. Educated at Dublin, he obtained a commission as ensign in the 12th Foot in March 1852, and was transferred to the 80th Foot. with which he served in the Second Burmese War. He was severely wounded on the 19th of March 1833 in the attack of Donabyu, was mentioned in despatches, and received the war medal. Promoted to be lieutenant and invalided home, he exchanged into the 90th Light Infantry, then in Dublin.

He accompanied the regiment to the Crimea, and landed at BalaklavaFor the mask/harsh weather hood named for the city, see balaclava. Balaklava is a section of the city of Sevastopol, in the Crimea region of Ukraine. It was made famous by on October 25, 1854, when a mix up of orders led to the famously suicidal Charge of in December 1854. He was selected to be an assistant engineer, and served with the Royal EngineersThe Corps of Royal Engineers (RE), commonly known as the Sappers is one of the corps of the British Army. It provides combat engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces. The Regimental Headquarters and the Royal School of Military in the trenches during the Siege of Sevastopol. He was promoted to be captain in January 1855 after less than three years' service, and served throughout the siege, was wounded at the Quarries on June 7, and againin the trenches on August 30. After the fall of Sevastopol Wolseley was employed on the quartermaster-general's staff, assisted in the embarkation of the troops and stores, and was one of the last to leavethe Crimea in July 1856. For his services he was twice mentioned in despatches, was noted for a brevet majority, received the war medal with clasp, the 5th class of the French Légion d'honneurThe Legion d'honneur (in English: Legion of Honor is an Order of Chivalry awarded by the President of France. First instituted by Emperor Napoleon I on May 19, 1802, it is one of the most prestigious French awards and the country's highest civilian honor., the 5th class of the Turkish Mejidie and the Turkish medal.

After six months' duty with the 90th Foot at AldershotSee also Aldershot, Ontario. Aldershot is a town in Hampshire, England, administered by Rushmoor Borough Council. Aldershot is known for its connection with the British Army which came to the area in 1854. Aldershot's MP is Gerald Howarth (Conservative)., he went with it in March 1857, to join the expedition to China under Major-General Ashburnham. Wolseley embarked in the transport "Transit," which was wrecked in the Strait of Banka . The troops were all saved, but with only their arms and a few rounds of ammunition, and were taken to SingaporeThe Republic of Singapore ( Chinese , pinyin: Xinjiapo Gonghegu Malay Republik Singapura Tamil , Cingkappur Kudiyarasu , is an island city-state in Southeast Asia, at latitude 1°17'35"N longitude 103°51'20"E, situated on the southern tip of Malay Peninsul; whence, on account of the Indian Mutiny, they were despatched with all haste to CalcuttaThis article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. For the gambling term, see Calcutta Calcutta is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal. Its original name was Kalikata and is, in higher literature, still referred to as such. Speakers of the region's.

Wolseley distinguished himself at the relief of Lucknow under Sir Colin Campbell in November, and in the defence of the Alambagh position under Outram, taking part in the actions of December 22, 1857, of January 12 and 16, and the repulse of the grand attack of February 21. In March he served at the final siege and capture of Lucknow. He was then appointed deputy-assistant quartermaster-general on the staff of Sir Hope Grant 's Oudh division, and was engaged in all the operations of the campaign, including the actions of Bari, Sarsi, Nawabganj , the capture of Faizabad, the passage of the Gumti and the action of Sultanpur . In the autumn and winter of 1858 he took part in the Baiswara , trans-Gogra and trans-Rapti campaigns ending with the complete suppression of the rebellion. For his services he was frequently mentioned in despatches, and having received his Crimean majority in March 1858, was in April 1859 promoted to be lieutenant-colonel, and received the Mutinymedal and clasp.

Wolseley continued to serve on Sir Hope Grant's staff in Oudh, and when Grant was nominated to the command of the British troops in the Anglo-French expedition to China in 1860, accom­panied him as deputy-assistant quartermaster-general. He was present at the action at Sin-ho, the capture of Tang-ku, the storming of the Taku Forts, the Occupation of Tientsin, the battle of Pa-to-cheau and the entry into Beijing. He assisted in the re-embarkation of the troops before the winter set in. He was mentioned in despatches, and for his services received themedal and two clasps. On his return home he published the Narrative of the War with China in 1860.

In November 1861 Wolseley was one of the special service officers sent to Canada in connection with the "Trent" incident. When the matter was amicably settled he remained on the headquarters staff in Canada as assistant-quartermaster-general. In 1865 he became a brevet colonel, was actively employed the following year in connexion with the Fenian raids from the United States, and in 1867 was appointed deputy quartermaster-general in Canada. In 1869 his Soldiers' Pocket Book for Field Service was published, and has since run through many editions. In 1870 he successfully commanded the Red River expedition to establish Canadian sovereignty over the Northwest Territories and Manitoba. Manitoba had entered Canadian Confederation as the result of negotiations between Canada and a provisional Métis government headed by Louis Riel. The only route to Fort Garry (now Winnipeg), the capital of Manitoba (then an outpost in the Wilderness), which did not pass through the United States was through a network of rivers and lakes extending for 600 miles from Lake Superior, infrequently traversed by non-aboriginals, and where no supplies were obtainable. The admirable arrangements made and the careful organization of the transport reflected great credit on the commander, who on his returnhome was made a KCMG and a CB.

Appointed assistant adjutant-general at the War Office in 1871 he worked hard in furthering the Cardwell scheme s of army reform was a member of the localization committee, and a keen advocate of short service, territorial regiments and linked battalions. From this time till he became commander-­in-chief Wolseley was the prime mover in practically all the steps taken atthe War Office for promoting the efficiency of the army, under the altered conditions of the day.

In 1873 he commanded the expedition to Ashanti, and, having made all his arrangements at the Gold Coast before the arrival of the troops in January 1874, was able to com­plete the campaign in two months, and re-embark them for home before the unhealthy season began. This was the campaign which made his name a household word in England. He fought the battle of Amoaful on January 31, and, after five days' fighting, ending with the battle of Ordahsu , entered Kumasi, which he burned. He received the thanks of both houses of Parliament and a grant of £25,000 was promoted to be major general for distinguished service in the field, received the medal and clasp and was made GCMG and KCB. The freedom of the city of London was conferred upon him with a sword of honour, and he was made honorary DC.L of Oxford and LL.D of Cambridge universities. On his returnhome he was appointed inspector-general of auxiliary forces, but had not held the post for a year when, in consequence of the native unrest in Natal, he was sent to that colony as governor and general commanding.

In November 1876 he accepted a seat on the council of India , from which in 1878, having been promoted lieutenant-general, he went as high-commissioner to the newly acquired possession of Cyprus, and in the following year to South Africa to supersede Lord Chelmsford in command of the forces in the Zulu War, and as governor of Natal and the Transvaal and high commissioner of South-East Africa. But on his arrival at Durban in July he found that the war in Zululand was practically over, and after effecting a temporary settlement he went to the Transvaal. Having reorganized the administration there and reduced the powerful chief Sikukuni to submission, he returnedhome in May 1880 and was appointed quartermaster-general to the forces. For his services in South Africa he received the Zulu medal with clasp, and was made a GCB.

In 1882 he was appointed adjutant-general to the forces, and in August of that year was given the command of the British forces in Egypt to suppress the Urabi Revolt. Having seized the Suez Canal, he disembarked his troops at Ismailia, and after a very short and brilliant campaign completely defeated Arabi Pasha at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir , and suppressed the rebellion. For his services he received the thanks of Parliament, the medal with clasp, the bronze star, was promoted general for distinguished service in the field, raised to the peerage as Baron Wolseley of Cairo and Wolseley, and received from the Khedive the 1st class of the order of the Osmanieh.

In 1884 he was again called away from his duties as adjutant-general to command the Nile expedition for the relief of General Gordon and the besieged garrison of Khartoum. The expedition arrived too late; Khartoum had fallen, and Gordon was dead; and in the spring of 1835 com­plications with Russia over the Penjdeh incident occurred, and the withdrawal of the expedition followed. For his services be received two clasps to his Egyptian medal, the thanks of parliament, and was created a viscount and a knight of St Patrick. He continued at the War Office as adjutant-general to the forces until 1890, when he was given the command in Ireland. He was promoted to be field marshal in 1894, and was nominated colonel of the Royal Horse Guards in 1895, in which year he was appointed by the Unionist government to succeed the Duke of Cambridge as commander-in-chief of the forces. This was the position to which his great experience in the field and his previous signal success at the War Office itself had fully entitled him. His powers were, however, limited by a new order in council, and after holding the appointment for over five years, he handed over the command-in-chief to Earl Roberts at the commencement of 1901. The unexpectedly large force required for South Africa, was mainly furnished by means of the system of reserves which Lord Wolseley had originated; but the new conditions at the War Office were not to his liking, and on being released from responsibility he brought the whole subject before the House of Lords in a speech.

Lord Wolseley was appointed colonel-in-chief of the Royal Irish Regiment in 1898, and in 1901 was made gold­stick in waiting . He married in 1867 Louisa, daughter of Mr A. Erskine, his only child, Frances, being heiress to the viscountcy under special remainder.

A frequent contributor to periodicals, he also published The Decline and Fall of Napoleon (1895), The Life of John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough to the Accession of Queen Anne (1894), and The Story of a Soldier's Life (1903), giving in the last-named work an account of his career down to the close of the Ashanti War.

He died on March 26, 1913, at Mentone, France.
Wolseley, Garnet Wolseley, Garnet Wolseley, Garnet
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PostSubject: Maj-Gen. Sir G. Wolseley.   Sat Jun 19, 2010 11:41 am

Maj-Gen. Sir G. Wolseley, Lord Chelmsford's successor (St. Paul's Cathedral)
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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sat Oct 30, 2010 8:37 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sun Feb 27, 2011 5:27 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sun Jul 31, 2011 5:57 pm

Garnet Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley

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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Mon Aug 01, 2011 8:47 pm

Garnet Joseph Wolseley proved to be probably the most accomplished
officer to serve in the 90th Regiment.  It is ironic that his initial
entry into the army was not achieved without some difficulty.

The initial approach was made by his uncle, Brevet Major Robert
Benjamin Wolseley, late 41st Foot, in a letter addressed to the
Commander-in-Chief, The Duke of Wellington in May 1847.  In it, he
explained that James’s father, Brevet Major G J Wolseley, sold out his
commission in 1826 after serving twenty-five years in the 37th and
25th Regiments but had since died.
He said his widow Lady Frances Anne was now trying to educate seven
children on very limited means and would not be able to purchase a
commission for James and, therefore, was it possible to place him on
the list of candidates for a commission ‘Without Purchase’.  He was
fourteen at the time and was studying various subjects such as French
and Mathematics.

This application for him to be added to the list was successful but
when nothing further had developed both Garnet and his mother wrote to
the Duke in unusually forthright terms effectively taking him to task
over the matter.  Garnet wrote in September 1850 and again in January
1851.  When these were unsuccessful, his mother wrote to the Duke in
September 1851 suggesting to the Duke that, if he met his promise of
three years earlier his reward would be in heaven.  However, if he
were unable to meet his promise would he please advise her, as Garnet
would then have to enlist as a Private soldier and take his chances to
make officer?  Garnet was duly awarded a commission as an Ensign
‘Without Purchase’ in March 1852.

His career from this point encapsulated in the following edited
extracts from: The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, 1910-1911:

Garnet Joseph Wolseley, Viscount British Field Marshal, was born at
Golden Bridge, Co. Dublin, on the 4th of June 1833. Educated at
Dublin, he obtained a commission as Ensign in the 12th Foot in March
1852, and was transferred to the 80th Foot with which he served in the
second Burmese War. He was severely wounded on the 19th of March 1853
in the attack of Donabyu, was mentioned in despatches, and received
the war medal. Promoted to Lieutenant and invalided home, he exchanged
into the 90th Light Infantry, then in Dublin.

In the Crimea he landed at Balaklava in December 1854 and was selected
to be an Assistant Engineer, and did duty with the Royal Engineers in
the trenches before Sevastopol. He was promoted to be Captain in
January 1855 after less than three years' service, and served
throughout the siege, was wounded at the Quarries on the 7th of June
and was on Sick leave on Board Ship 5 to 13 August.  He was then
wounded a second time in the trenches on the 30th of August. His
injuries included loss of the sight in his right eye from a shell
burst.

After the fall of Sevastopol Wolseley was employed on the
Quartermaster-General's Staff in Constantinople, assisted in the
embarkation of the troops and stores, and was one of the last to leave
the Crimea in July 1856. For his services he was twice mentioned in
despatches, was noted for a Brevet Majority, received the Crimean War
Medal with clasp, the 5th class of the French Legion of Honour, the
5th Class of the Turkish Mejidie and the Turkish Medal.

After this event, Wolseley was recommended for the Victoria Cross but
it does not appear to have been awarded. Wolseley VC Citation was not
found, only the letter from J N Gordon of the Engineers to Deputy
Adjutant General of Engineers at the War Department, Pall Mall, as
follows:

Sir,
I have the honour to forward to you the accompanying Report from Sir
Harry Jones of an Assistant Engineer Capt. G J Wolesley 90th Regiment
recommended for the Victoria Cross.

This letter was stamped as received November 25, 1856 and is therefore
likely to be related to the rescue of Private Andrews by Captain
Garnet J. Wolseley, an event which was the subject of the first
military print, produced in 1881, by the prolific illustrator and
artist ‘William Barnes Woollen’

Further edited extracts from: The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th
Edition, 1910-1911:

In March 1857, he joined the expedition to China.  He embarked in
command of three com panies in the transport "Transit," which was
wrecked in the Strait of Banka. The troops were all saved, and were
taken to Singapore; whence, on account of the Indian Mutiny, they were
despatched with all haste to Calcutta. He distinguished himself at the
relief of Lucknow under Sir Colin Campbell in November, and in the
defence of the Alambagh position under Outram.  For his services he
was frequently mentioned in despatches, and having received his
Crimean Majority in March 1858, was promoted to be Lieutenant Colonel
in April 1859, and received the Indian Mutiny Medal and clasp.

He continued to serve on Sir Hope Grant's staff in Oudh, and when
Grant was nominated to the command of the British troops in the
Anglo-French expedition to China in 1860, accom panied him as
deputy-assistant quartermaster-general. He was present at the action
at Sin-ho, the capture of Tang-ku, the storming of the Taku Forts, the
Occupation of Tientsin, the battle of Pa-to-cheau and the entry into
Peking.

In November 1861 he was one of the special service officers sent to in
case of war with the United States in connection with the, mail
steamer "Trent" incident.  He remained on the headquarters staff in
Canada as assistant-quartermaster-general. In 1865 he became a Brevet
Colonel, was actively employed the following year in connection with
the Fenian raids from the United States.  In 1867 he was appointed
Deputy Quartermaster-General in Canada. In 1870 he commanded the Red
River expedition to put down a rising under Louis Riel at Fort Garry,
now the city of Winnipeg.  On his return home was made KCMG. and CB.

He was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General at the War Office in 1871
and worked hard in furthering the Cardwell schemes of army reform.
However, in 1873 he commanded the expedition to Ashanti, and was able
to complete the campaign in two months in early 1874. He received the
thanks of both houses of Parliament and a grant of £25,000 was
promoted to be Major General for distinguished service in the field,
received the medal and clasp and was made GCMG. and KCB. The freedom
of the City of London was conferred upon him with a sword of honour,
and awarded honorary degrees from both Oxford and Cambridge
universities.

In November 1876 he accepted a seat on the council of India, from
which in 1878, having been promoted Lieutenant General, he went as
high commissioner to the newly acquired possession of Cyprus.  He to
superseded Lord Chelmsford in command of the forces in the Zulu War,
and as governor of Natal and the Transvaal and high commissioner of
South-East Africa.   For his services he received the Zulu Medal with
clasp, and was made GCB. He returned home in May 1880 and was
appointed Quartermaster-General to the forces.

In 1882 he was appointed Adjutant-General to the forces, in command of
the British forces in Egypt to suppress the rebellion of Arabi Pasha
who he completely defeated at Tel-el-Kebir after a very short and
brilliant campaign.  He received the thanks of parliament, the medal
with clasp, the bronze star, was promoted General for distinguished
service in the field, raised to the peerage as Baron Wolseley of Cairo
and Wolseley, and received from the Khedive the 1st Class of the Order
of the Osmanieh.

In 1884 he was again called away from his duties as Adjutant-General
to command the eventually unsuccessful Nile expedition to relieve
General Gordon and the besieged garrison of Khartum.  For his services
be received two clasps to his Egyptian medal, the thanks of
parliament, and was created a Viscount and a Knight of St Patrick. He
continued at the War Office as Adjutant-General to the forces until
1890, when he was given the command in Ireland. He was promoted to be
Field Marshal in 1894, and was nominated Colonel of the Royal Horse
Guards in 1895 and in the same year he was appointed by the Unionist
government to succeed the Duke of Cambridge as Commander-in-Chief of
the forces.  After five years, he handed over the Command-in-Chief to
Earl Roberts at the commencement of 1901.

Field-Marshal Viscount Garnet Joseph Wolseley died at Menton in France
on the 25 March 1913 and was buried at St Paul’s Cathedral in London.
He had married Louisa Erskine, daughter to Mr A Erskine during the
June quarter of 1867 at St James in Westminster. Their only child,
Frances, being heiress to the Viscountcy under special remainder.

South Lanarkshire Council Museums have in their collection several of
Wolseley's diaries, which are currently being transcribed by Museum
staff.

Sourcehis biography was researched by Patricia Martin and the
original design and layout was by Katie Barclay, with photographic
scanning by Joanne McPhie. The research was funded by the Trustees of
the Cameronians.
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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Mon Oct 03, 2011 1:07 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sat Jan 31, 2015 9:54 pm

Memorial to Garnet Wolseley in Colwich Church, Staffordshire.
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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:55 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sat Jul 15, 2017 9:55 pm

Posted by John

Garnet Joseph Wolseley, 1st Viscount Wolseley of Cairo, ( June 4, 1833 - March 26, 1913) was a British field marshal. He served in Burma, the Crimean War, the Indian Mutiny, China, Canada, and widely in Africa - including his brilliantly executed Ashanti campaign (1873-74).

He was the eldest son of Major Garnet Joseph Wolseley of the King's Own Borderers (25th Foot.), he was born at Golden Bridge, Co. Dublin. Educated at Dublin, he obtained a commission as ensign in the 12th Foot in March 1852, and was transferred to the 80th Foot. with which he served in the Second Burmese War. He was severely wounded on the 19th of March 1833 in the attack of Donabyu, was mentioned in despatches, and received the war medal. Promoted to be lieutenant and invalided home, he exchanged into the 90th Light Infantry, then in Dublin.

He accompanied the regiment to the Crimea, and landed at BalaklavaFor the mask/harsh weather hood named for the city, see balaclava. Balaklava is a section of the city of Sevastopol, in the Crimea region of Ukraine. It was made famous by on October 25, 1854, when a mix up of orders led to the famously suicidal Charge of in December 1854. He was selected to be an assistant engineer, and served with the Royal EngineersThe Corps of Royal Engineers (RE), commonly known as the Sappers is one of the corps of the British Army. It provides combat engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces. The Regimental Headquarters and the Royal School of Military in the trenches during the Siege of Sevastopol. He was promoted to be captain in January 1855 after less than three years' service, and served throughout the siege, was wounded at the Quarries on June 7, and againin the trenches on August 30. After the fall of Sevastopol Wolseley was employed on the quartermaster-general's staff, assisted in the embarkation of the troops and stores, and was one of the last to leavethe Crimea in July 1856. For his services he was twice mentioned in despatches, was noted for a brevet majority, received the war medal with clasp, the 5th class of the French Légion d'honneurThe Legion d'honneur (in English: Legion of Honor is an Order of Chivalry awarded by the President of France. First instituted by Emperor Napoleon I on May 19, 1802, it is one of the most prestigious French awards and the country's highest civilian honor., the 5th class of the Turkish Mejidie and the Turkish medal.

After six months' duty with the 90th Foot at AldershotSee also Aldershot, Ontario. Aldershot is a town in Hampshire, England, administered by Rushmoor Borough Council. Aldershot is known for its connection with the British Army which came to the area in 1854. Aldershot's MP is Gerald Howarth (Conservative)., he went with it in March 1857, to join the expedition to China under Major-General Ashburnham. Wolseley embarked in the transport "Transit," which was wrecked in the Strait of Banka . The troops were all saved, but with only their arms and a few rounds of ammunition, and were taken to SingaporeThe Republic of Singapore ( Chinese , pinyin: Xinjiapo Gonghegu Malay Republik Singapura Tamil , Cingkappur Kudiyarasu , is an island city-state in Southeast Asia, at latitude 1°17'35"N longitude 103°51'20"E, situated on the southern tip of Malay Peninsul; whence, on account of the Indian Mutiny, they were despatched with all haste to CalcuttaThis article is on Calcutta/Kolkata, the city. For the gambling term, see Calcutta Calcutta is the capital of the Indian state of West Bengal. Its original name was Kalikata and is, in higher literature, still referred to as such. Speakers of the region's.

Wolseley distinguished himself at the relief of Lucknow under Sir Colin Campbell in November, and in the defence of the Alambagh position under Outram, taking part in the actions of December 22, 1857, of January 12 and 16, and the repulse of the grand attack of February 21. In March he served at the final siege and capture of Lucknow. He was then appointed deputy-assistant quartermaster-general on the staff of Sir Hope Grant 's Oudh division, and was engaged in all the operations of the campaign, including the actions of Bari, Sarsi, Nawabganj , the capture of Faizabad, the passage of the Gumti and the action of Sultanpur . In the autumn and winter of 1858 he took part in the Baiswara , trans-Gogra and trans-Rapti campaigns ending with the complete suppression of the rebellion. For his services he was frequently mentioned in despatches, and having received his Crimean majority in March 1858, was in April 1859 promoted to be lieutenant-colonel, and received the Mutinymedal and clasp.

Wolseley continued to serve on Sir Hope Grant's staff in Oudh, and when Grant was nominated to the command of the British troops in the Anglo-French expedition to China in 1860, accom­panied him as deputy-assistant quartermaster-general. He was present at the action at Sin-ho, the capture of Tang-ku, the storming of the Taku Forts, the Occupation of Tientsin, the battle of Pa-to-cheau and the entry into Beijing. He assisted in the re-embarkation of the troops before the winter set in. He was mentioned in despatches, and for his services received themedal and two clasps. On his return home he published the Narrative of the War with China in 1860.

In November 1861 Wolseley was one of the special service officers sent to Canada in connection with the "Trent" incident. When the matter was amicably settled he remained on the headquarters staff in Canada as assistant-quartermaster-general. In 1865 he became a brevet colonel, was actively employed the following year in connexion with the Fenian raids from the United States, and in 1867 was appointed deputy quartermaster-general in Canada. In 1869 his Soldiers' Pocket Book for Field Service was published, and has since run through many editions. In 1870 he successfully commanded the Red River expedition to establish Canadian sovereignty over the Northwest Territories and Manitoba. Manitoba had entered Canadian Confederation as the result of negotiations between Canada and a provisional Métis government headed by Louis Riel. The only route to Fort Garry (now Winnipeg), the capital of Manitoba (then an outpost in the Wilderness), which did not pass through the United States was through a network of rivers and lakes extending for 600 miles from Lake Superior, infrequently traversed by non-aboriginals, and where no supplies were obtainable. The admirable arrangements made and the careful organization of the transport reflected great credit on the commander, who on his returnhome was made a KCMG and a CB.

Appointed assistant adjutant-general at the War Office in 1871 he worked hard in furthering the Cardwell scheme s of army reform was a member of the localization committee, and a keen advocate of short service, territorial regiments and linked battalions. From this time till he became commander-­in-chief Wolseley was the prime mover in practically all the steps taken atthe War Office for promoting the efficiency of the army, under the altered conditions of the day.

In 1873 he commanded the expedition to Ashanti, and, having made all his arrangements at the Gold Coast before the arrival of the troops in January 1874, was able to com­plete the campaign in two months, and re-embark them for home before the unhealthy season began. This was the campaign which made his name a household word in England. He fought the battle of Amoaful on January 31, and, after five days' fighting, ending with the battle of Ordahsu , entered Kumasi, which he burned. He received the thanks of both houses of Parliament and a grant of £25,000 was promoted to be major general for distinguished service in the field, received the medal and clasp and was made GCMG and KCB. The freedom of the city of London was conferred upon him with a sword of honour, and he was made honorary DC.L of Oxford and LL.D of Cambridge universities. On his returnhome he was appointed inspector-general of auxiliary forces, but had not held the post for a year when, in consequence of the native unrest in Natal, he was sent to that colony as governor and general commanding.

In November 1876 he accepted a seat on the council of India , from which in 1878, having been promoted lieutenant-general, he went as high-commissioner to the newly acquired possession of Cyprus, and in the following year to South Africa to supersede Lord Chelmsford in command of the forces in the Zulu War, and as governor of Natal and the Transvaal and high commissioner of South-East Africa. But on his arrival at Durban in July he found that the war in Zululand was practically over, and after effecting a temporary settlement he went to the Transvaal. Having reorganized the administration there and reduced the powerful chief Sikukuni to submission, he returnedhome in May 1880 and was appointed quartermaster-general to the forces. For his services in South Africa he received the Zulu medal with clasp, and was made a GCB.

In 1882 he was appointed adjutant-general to the forces, and in August of that year was given the command of the British forces in Egypt to suppress the Urabi Revolt. Having seized the Suez Canal, he disembarked his troops at Ismailia, and after a very short and brilliant campaign completely defeated Arabi Pasha at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir , and suppressed the rebellion. For his services he received the thanks of Parliament, the medal with clasp, the bronze star, was promoted general for distinguished service in the field, raised to the peerage as Baron Wolseley of Cairo and Wolseley, and received from the Khedive the 1st class of the order of the Osmanieh.

In 1884 he was again called away from his duties as adjutant-general to command the Nile expedition for the relief of General Gordon and the besieged garrison of Khartoum. The expedition arrived too late; Khartoum had fallen, and Gordon was dead; and in the spring of 1835 com­plications with Russia over the Penjdeh incident occurred, and the withdrawal of the expedition followed. For his services be received two clasps to his Egyptian medal, the thanks of parliament, and was created a viscount and a knight of St Patrick. He continued at the War Office as adjutant-general to the forces until 1890, when he was given the command in Ireland. He was promoted to be field marshal in 1894, and was nominated colonel of the Royal Horse Guards in 1895, in which year he was appointed by the Unionist government to succeed the Duke of Cambridge as commander-in-chief of the forces. This was the position to which his great experience in the field and his previous signal success at the War Office itself had fully entitled him. His powers were, however, limited by a new order in council, and after holding the appointment for over five years, he handed over the command-in-chief to Earl Roberts at the commencement of 1901. The unexpectedly large force required for South Africa, was mainly furnished by means of the system of reserves which Lord Wolseley had originated; but the new conditions at the War Office were not to his liking, and on being released from responsibility he brought the whole subject before the House of Lords in a speech.

Lord Wolseley was appointed colonel-in-chief of the Royal Irish Regiment in 1898, and in 1901 was made gold­stick in waiting . He married in 1867 Louisa, daughter of Mr A. Erskine, his only child, Frances, being heiress to the viscountcy under special remainder.

A frequent contributor to periodicals, he also published The Decline and Fall of Napoleon (1895), The Life of John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough to the Accession of Queen Anne (1894), and The Story of a Soldier's Life (1903), giving in the last-named work an account of his career down to the close of the Ashanti War.

He died on March 26, 1913, at Mentone, France.
Wolseley, Garnet Wolseley, Garnet Wolseley, Garnet
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PostSubject: Re: Garnet Joseph Viscount Wolseley   Sat Jul 15, 2017 10:00 pm

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Garnet Joseph Wolseley proved to be probably the most accomplished
officer to serve in the 90th Regiment.  It is ironic that his initial
entry into the army was not achieved without some difficulty.

The initial approach was made by his uncle, Brevet Major Robert
Benjamin Wolseley, late 41st Foot, in a letter addressed to the
Commander-in-Chief, The Duke of Wellington in May 1847.  In it, he
explained that James’s father, Brevet Major G J Wolseley, sold out his
commission in 1826 after serving twenty-five years in the 37th and
25th Regiments but had since died.
He said his widow Lady Frances Anne was now trying to educate seven
children on very limited means and would not be able to purchase a
commission for James and, therefore, was it possible to place him on
the list of candidates for a commission ‘Without Purchase’.  He was
fourteen at the time and was studying various subjects such as French
and Mathematics.

This application for him to be added to the list was successful but
when nothing further had developed both Garnet and his mother wrote to
the Duke in unusually forthright terms effectively taking him to task
over the matter.  Garnet wrote in September 1850 and again in January
1851.  When these were unsuccessful, his mother wrote to the Duke in
September 1851 suggesting to the Duke that, if he met his promise of
three years earlier his reward would be in heaven.  However, if he
were unable to meet his promise would he please advise her, as Garnet
would then have to enlist as a Private soldier and take his chances to
make officer?  Garnet was duly awarded a commission as an Ensign
‘Without Purchase’ in March 1852.

His career from this point encapsulated in the following edited
extracts from: The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, 1910-1911:

Garnet Joseph Wolseley, Viscount British Field Marshal, was born at
Golden Bridge, Co. Dublin, on the 4th of June 1833. Educated at
Dublin, he obtained a commission as Ensign in the 12th Foot in March
1852, and was transferred to the 80th Foot with which he served in the
second Burmese War. He was severely wounded on the 19th of March 1853
in the attack of Donabyu, was mentioned in despatches, and received
the war medal. Promoted to Lieutenant and invalided home, he exchanged
into the 90th Light Infantry, then in Dublin.

In the Crimea he landed at Balaklava in December 1854 and was selected
to be an Assistant Engineer, and did duty with the Royal Engineers in
the trenches before Sevastopol. He was promoted to be Captain in
January 1855 after less than three years' service, and served
throughout the siege, was wounded at the Quarries on the 7th of June
and was on Sick leave on Board Ship 5 to 13 August.  He was then
wounded a second time in the trenches on the 30th of August. His
injuries included loss of the sight in his right eye from a shell
burst.

After the fall of Sevastopol Wolseley was employed on the
Quartermaster-General's Staff in Constantinople, assisted in the
embarkation of the troops and stores, and was one of the last to leave
the Crimea in July 1856. For his services he was twice mentioned in
despatches, was noted for a Brevet Majority, received the Crimean War
Medal with clasp, the 5th class of the French Legion of Honour, the
5th Class of the Turkish Mejidie and the Turkish Medal.

After this event, Wolseley was recommended for the Victoria Cross but
it does not appear to have been awarded. Wolseley VC Citation was not
found, only the letter from J N Gordon of the Engineers to Deputy
Adjutant General of Engineers at the War Department, Pall Mall, as
follows:

Sir,
I have the honour to forward to you the accompanying Report from Sir
Harry Jones of an Assistant Engineer Capt. G J Wolesley 90th Regiment
recommended for the Victoria Cross.

This letter was stamped as received November 25, 1856 and is therefore
likely to be related to the rescue of Private Andrews by Captain
Garnet J. Wolseley, an event which was the subject of the first
military print, produced in 1881, by the prolific illustrator and
artist ‘William Barnes Woollen’

Further edited extracts from: The Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th
Edition, 1910-1911:

In March 1857, he joined the expedition to China.  He embarked in
command of three com panies in the transport "Transit," which was
wrecked in the Strait of Banka. The troops were all saved, and were
taken to Singapore; whence, on account of the Indian Mutiny, they were
despatched with all haste to Calcutta. He distinguished himself at the
relief of Lucknow under Sir Colin Campbell in November, and in the
defence of the Alambagh position under Outram.  For his services he
was frequently mentioned in despatches, and having received his
Crimean Majority in March 1858, was promoted to be Lieutenant Colonel
in April 1859, and received the Indian Mutiny Medal and clasp.

He continued to serve on Sir Hope Grant's staff in Oudh, and when
Grant was nominated to the command of the British troops in the
Anglo-French expedition to China in 1860, accom panied him as
deputy-assistant quartermaster-general. He was present at the action
at Sin-ho, the capture of Tang-ku, the storming of the Taku Forts, the
Occupation of Tientsin, the battle of Pa-to-cheau and the entry into
Peking.

In November 1861 he was one of the special service officers sent to in
case of war with the United States in connection with the, mail
steamer "Trent" incident.  He remained on the headquarters staff in
Canada as assistant-quartermaster-general. In 1865 he became a Brevet
Colonel, was actively employed the following year in connection with
the Fenian raids from the United States.  In 1867 he was appointed
Deputy Quartermaster-General in Canada. In 1870 he commanded the Red
River expedition to put down a rising under Louis Riel at Fort Garry,
now the city of Winnipeg.  On his return home was made KCMG. and CB.

He was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General at the War Office in 1871
and worked hard in furthering the Cardwell schemes of army reform.
However, in 1873 he commanded the expedition to Ashanti, and was able
to complete the campaign in two months in early 1874. He received the
thanks of both houses of Parliament and a grant of £25,000 was
promoted to be Major General for distinguished service in the field,
received the medal and clasp and was made GCMG. and KCB. The freedom
of the City of London was conferred upon him with a sword of honour,
and awarded honorary degrees from both Oxford and Cambridge
universities.

In November 1876 he accepted a seat on the council of India, from
which in 1878, having been promoted Lieutenant General, he went as
high commissioner to the newly acquired possession of Cyprus.  He to
superseded Lord Chelmsford in command of the forces in the Zulu War,
and as governor of Natal and the Transvaal and high commissioner of
South-East Africa.   For his services he received the Zulu Medal with
clasp, and was made GCB. He returned home in May 1880 and was
appointed Quartermaster-General to the forces.

In 1882 he was appointed Adjutant-General to the forces, in command of
the British forces in Egypt to suppress the rebellion of Arabi Pasha
who he completely defeated at Tel-el-Kebir after a very short and
brilliant campaign.  He received the thanks of parliament, the medal
with clasp, the bronze star, was promoted General for distinguished
service in the field, raised to the peerage as Baron Wolseley of Cairo
and Wolseley, and received from the Khedive the 1st Class of the Order
of the Osmanieh.

In 1884 he was again called away from his duties as Adjutant-General
to command the eventually unsuccessful Nile expedition to relieve
General Gordon and the besieged garrison of Khartum.  For his services
be received two clasps to his Egyptian medal, the thanks of
parliament, and was created a Viscount and a Knight of St Patrick. He
continued at the War Office as Adjutant-General to the forces until
1890, when he was given the command in Ireland. He was promoted to be
Field Marshal in 1894, and was nominated Colonel of the Royal Horse
Guards in 1895 and in the same year he was appointed by the Unionist
government to succeed the Duke of Cambridge as Commander-in-Chief of
the forces.  After five years, he handed over the Command-in-Chief to
Earl Roberts at the commencement of 1901.

Field-Marshal Viscount Garnet Joseph Wolseley died at Menton in France
on the 25 March 1913 and was buried at St Paul’s Cathedral in London.
He had married Louisa Erskine, daughter to Mr A Erskine during the
June quarter of 1867 at St James in Westminster. Their only child,
Frances, being heiress to the Viscountcy under special remainder.

South Lanarkshire Council Museums have in their collection several of
Wolseley's diaries, which are currently being transcribed by Museum
staff.

Sourcehis biography was researched by Patricia Martin and the
original design and layout was by Katie Barclay, with photographic
scanning by Joanne McPhie. The research was funded by the Trustees of
the Cameronians.
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