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 MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,

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24th

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PostSubject: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Wed Aug 19, 2009 9:36 pm

MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,

"Founder of the famous regiment of " Carrington's Horse," was born in 1844. After a course of education at Cheltenham College he entered the Army in 1864. Whilst Commanding the Light Horse he showed great ability during the Transkei War of 1877-78. Since then he has been repeatedly fighting in South Africa. The regiment of horse, already referred to, accomplished excellent work against the native chief Sekukim, in the Transvaal, 1878-9. In the Zulu War, the Boer War of 1881, Matabele War, 1893, and the Rhodesian
Rebellion, General Carrington ably fulfilled his responsible appointments, at the same time gaining great knowledge of the country and the fighting methods of the natives which must now prove of great service to him. He received the command of Belfast District last year.

First receiving an appointment on the lines of communi- cation, he was immediately afterwards given the command of
5,000 Cavalry (including an Australian contingent numbering 2,500), and landing at Beira, carried on operations in Rhodesia."

Source: thenhistory
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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Fri Aug 21, 2009 7:18 pm

Major-General Sir F Carrington.

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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Sat Aug 22, 2009 12:38 pm

Major General Sir Frederick Carrington KCB, KCMG (23 August 1844 Cheltenham - 22 March 1913 Cheltenham), was a British soldier and friend of Cecil John Rhodes. He acquired fame by crushing the 1896 Matabele rebellion.

He was educated at Cheltenham College and joined the 24th Regiment of Foot in 1864.

In 1875 he arrived in South Africa, where he raised and commanded the Mounted Infantry in the Griqualand West expedition and the Frontier Light Horse in the Ninth Frontier War in 1877.

He commanded the Transvaal Volunteer Force against Sekhukhune in 1878-79 and the Cape Mounted Riflemen in the Basuto Gun War of 1881. He was severely wounded in this campaign.

In 1885 he accompanied Sir Charles Warren's expedition to Bechuanaland in command of the 2nd Mounted Infantry, which soon became known as 'Carrington's Horse'.

He commanded the Bechuanaland Police beginning in 1888. He was appointed military adviser to the High Commissioner in the First Matabele War. He commanded the British force in the Matabele Rebellion in 1896 and the Rhodesian Field Force during the Second Anglo-Boer War.

He was created a KCMG in 1887 and a KCB in 1897, and retired with the rank of major-general.

Carrington - Major-General Sir Frederick, KCB, KCMG - died 22nd March 1913
Grave at Cheltenham Borough Cemetery, Gloucestershire - "In memory of Major General Sir Frederick Carrington KCB, KCMG second son of Edmund and Louisa Carrington. Born August 23rd 1844. Died March 22nd 1913 in his 69th year."
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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Sat Aug 22, 2009 4:47 pm

Major-General Sir Frederick Carrington spent the greater part of his service in South Africa. He was born 23rd August 1844, . Educated at Cheltenham College before joining the 24th Regiment (South Wales Borderers) on 4th May 1864 as an Ensign. In 1875 career took a move forward when the 1st Battalion of the "old 24th" had just been moved to the Cape from Gibraltar. He was a subaltern and there was a requirement for someone to organize and command a corps of local mounted men for service in the Diamond Fields, where difficulties had arisen. Carrington volunteered his services that were readily accepted and it was here that he laid the foundation of his reputation. After two years he had formed, and was at the head of, "Carrington's Horse," on the occasion of the annexation of the Transvaal. In the Kaffir War of 1877, in the Transkei, he for the third time raised a mounted corps, namely the Frontier Light Horse, and was highly complimented. In the operations against the native chief Sekukuni, in 1878-79, he commanded the Transvaal Volunteers, and as he was so highly rated, he was entrusted the charge of the advanced guard and the left attack on the occasion of the capture of the stronghold. He was then given the brevet of Major and Lieutenant-Colonel, and made a C.M.G., and at the same time chosen to command the whole of the local forces in the Cape Colony. He gained field experience during the period November 1880 to March, 1881, when he commanded the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the corps he had been instrumental in raising against the Basutos when that warlike people were endeavouring to "make it hot" for the Boers. During these operations he was severely wounded, but did not give up his command, and for this reason his "gallantry, organising ability and wonderful resourcefulness" were brought to the notice of the Colonial Office.

He next took the field with Sir Charles Warren's Expedition to Bechuanaland in 1884-85, this time as Commandant of the 2nd Mounted Rifles. Sir Charles Warren formed the highest opinion of his abilities as a leader, and he placed on record his estimate of his worth.

He was promoted Colonel and during the troubles in Zululand in 1888 he was at the head of the Native Levies, who, it was said at the time, would have followed him "even to destruction, without a murmur," such was their belief in him. In May, 1894, he was promoted a Major-General, and a year later was appointed to the command of the Infantry Brigade at Gibraltar. The native difficulty in Rhodesia called him back to South Africa in April, 1896, when he was entrusted with the direction of military operations, with what success has been shown conclusively during the last nine months. He took over command of the troops in the Belfast District in March, 1899, and during this period was ordered to proceed yet again to South Africa.

First receiving an appointment on the lines of communication, he was immediately afterwards given the command of 5,000 Cavalry (including an Australian contingent numbering 2,500), and landing at Beira, carried on operations in Rhodesia.

He was invested as a Knight Commander, Order of the Bath (K.C.B.) and as a Knight Commander, Order of St. Michael and St. George (K.C.M.G.). He married Susan Margaret Elwes, daughter of Henry John Elwes and Margaret Susan Lownes-Stone, on 18th November 1897. They had one daughter, Frederica Dorothy Violet Carrington. He died 23rd March 1913.

Information comes from the following website
http://www.boer-war.com/Personalities/British/CarringtonSirFrederickMajor-General.html
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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Tue Aug 02, 2011 6:31 pm

those anyone know where i can get a copy of PHILIP GON'S " SEND CARRINGTON!!! "
regards
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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:16 pm

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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:45 pm

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LIEUTENANT-GENERAL SIR FREDERICK CARRINGTON knows South Africa as perhaps no other officer in Her Majesty's Service knows it. He has spent the greater part of his service there, and, more than that, has availed himself to the fullest extent of his opportunities of travel. He has hunted, shot and fished with an object, for he was one of those who were wise enough to foresee years ago that sooner or later the Dutch would give us trouble. So high does his name stand among the natives that it is quite one to conjure by, as the saying goes, for they recognize that what General Carrington does not know about them is not worth knowing. This is the man to whom has been entrusted the duty of guarding the Rhodesian borders with a force of Colonials and Imperial Yeomanry in the present crisis in South Africa. The duty could scarcely have been placed in more competent hands.

Lieutenant-General Sir Frederick Carrington was born August 23rd, 1844. On May 4th, 1864, he joined the 24th Regiment, now the South Wales Borderers, as Ensign. The first ten years of his service were uneventful ; but in 1875 his chance came. The 1st Battalion of the "old 24th" had just been moved to the Cape from Gibraltar. Carrington was a subaltern; somebody was wanted to organize and command a corps of local mounted men for service in the Diamond Fields, where difficulties had arisen. He volunteered; his services were accepted. It was there that he laid the foundation of his reputation. Two years later found him at the head of "Carrington's Horse" on the occasion of the annexation of the Transvaal. In the Kaffir War of 1877, in the Transkei, he for the third time raised a mounted corps—the Frontier Light Horse—and was highly complimented. In the operations against the native chief Sekukuni, in 1878-79, he commanded the Transvaal Volunteers, and so high stood his good name, that to him was entrusted the charge of the advanced guard and left attack on the occasion of the capture of the stronghold. Advantage was now taken of the opportunity for recognising in a substantial manner the value of this tried leader. He was given the brevet of Major and Lieutenant -Colonel, and made. a C.M.G., and at the same time chosen to command the whole of the local forces in the Cape Colony. This brought him in due course fresh field experience, as from November, 1880, to March, 1881, he commanded the Cape Mounted Riflemen, the corps he had been instrumental in raising against the Basutos when that warlike people were endeavouring to "make it hot" for the Boers. In these operations he was severely wounded, but with the pluck of a true soldier he would not yield his command, and his "gallantry, organising ability and wonderful resourcefulness" were brought prominently to the notice of the Colonial Office.

When next he took the field it was with Sir Charles Warren's Expedition to Bechuanaland in 1884-85, this time as Commandant of the 2nd Mounted Rifles. Sir Charles Warren formed the highest opinion of his abilities as a leader, and he placed on record his estimate of his worth.

In the troubles in Zululand in 1888 Colonel Carrington, as he had become, was at the head of the Native Levies, who, it was said at the time, would have followed him "even to destruction, without a murmur," such was their belief in him. In May, 1894, he was promoted a Major- General, and a year later was appointed to the command of the Infantry Brigade at Gibraltar. The native difficulty in Rhodesia called him back to South Africa in April, 1896, when he was entrusted with the direction of military operations, with what success has been shown conclusively during the last nine months. He took over command of the troops in the Belfast District in March, 1899, and it was whilst exercising the duties of that important charge that he was ordered to proceed yet again to South Africa on his present mission.
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PostSubject: Re: MAJOR-GENERAL SIR F. CARRINGTON,   Tue Aug 02, 2011 7:59 pm

CARRINGTON ROAD ( Just out of Interest )

Carrington Road has always been considered an avenue for the very well-to-do of Kimberley and boasts some truly historic houses, particularly those on the Kimberley side rather than the Beaconsfield side that are more modern. Two of the more outstanding houses are Rockmount and Kumo House, the former being originally owned by Andrew Bennie, while the latter was a Fort during the siege of Kimberley and is now known as Fort Kumo. (Kumo, incidentally, in Setswana, means ‘wealth’).

I digress however. Carrington Road is named after Major-General Sir Frederick Carrington KCMG KCB, who was born in Cheltenham, England on the 23rd August 1844 and died there on 22 March 1913.

The second son of Edmund and Louisa Carrington he was educated at Cheltenham College and entered the 24th Foot in 1864. In 1877, with the rank of subaltern, he raised and commanded the Frontier Light Horse for the Ninth
Frontier War in the Eastern Cape and was involved in actions throughout South Africa until 1881. This included the Griqualand West Uprising of 1878 and the Sekhukhune in 1878 and 1879. In the latter he commanded the Transvaal Volunteers.

In 1880 he was appointed Officer Commanding a part of the Cape Mounted Rifles and served throughout the Basuto (Lesotho) Gun War as second-in-command of all forces. Was besieged in Mafeteng but relieved in November 1880, and was wounded in March 1881. In 1884 he raised and commanded the 2nd Mounted Rifles (Carrington’s Horse) in Sir Charles Warren’s Expedition to Bechuanaland when Mafikeng was founded.

In 1885 he raised and commanded the Bechuanaland Border Police, this until 1893. Made a KCMG in 1887. In 1888 his experience was necessary in peace operations in Zululand where he commanded 5000 Zulu soldiers. He assisted in the raising of the British South Africa Company police force and in 1893 was advisor to the High Commissioner during the Matabele War. Promoted to

Major-General in 1895 and appointed to a command at Gibraltar. In 1896 was sent to command all forces during the Matabele Uprising. Later that year he married Susan Elwes, the union producing two daughters. Was made a KCB. In 1899 during the Anglo-Boer War was appointed Commander of the Rhodesian Field Force but only arrived there in March 1900, and finally entering the Transvaal in June 1900. Failed in his attempt to relieve Elands River Post in August and in September he returned to the then Rhodesia.

Retired from the army in 1904 to his lands in Cheltenham.

A powerfully built man he was once the amateur middleweight boxing champion of Great Britain. Loud voiced, foul tempered but with a courage bordering on foolhardiness, he was a superb trainer and leader of mounted infantry being a pioneer in this form of warfare. His reputation against African enemies was good but against the Boers extremely poor.
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PostSubject: Maj- Gen Sir F. Carrington   Fri Aug 05, 2011 3:39 pm

Hi ciroferrara.
Hope you didnt buy the one posted earlier . Suspect . Check the postage cost to the UK .



http://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=1081500679&searchurl=an%3Dphilip%2Bgon%26bt.x%3D43%26bt.y%3D17%26sts%3Dt%26tn%3Dsend%2Bcarrington

cheers 90th.
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