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 Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy

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PostSubject: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:07 pm

Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy.

After serving on HMS London on the East Coast of Africa where he distinguished himself, Cornwall-Legh was returning home when he volunteered for service in the Zulu War. Her majesty’s counsel at Mozambique was Henry O’Neill, former Lieutenant of HMS London. O’Neill took Cornwall-Legh with him on an 80 mile expedition to survey the Maputa River, and pacify the Amatonga tribe and prevent them from allying with the Zulu.

Afterwards Cornwall-Legh accompanied the Amatonga ambassadors to Pietermaritzburg to meet with British officials. Cornwall-Legh remained in Natal until returning back to England with Lord Chelmsford and Lieutenant A. B. Milne, RN on the steamship “German”. Awarded 1879 Medal, No clasp (appears on the “Medal Roll under Miscellaneous Corps & Regiments.”)

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:29 pm

Neville Edmund Cornwall Legh was born on 16 January 1854. He was the son of Brigadier Edmund Cornwall Legh and Julia Parker. He died on 21 June 1902 at age 48, unmarried.
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:38 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:53 pm

1859 — LEGH, E. 0., Lieutenant-Colonel—1902.
LEGH, N. E. C, Lieutenant. Inscription: — In loving memory of Edmund Cornwall Legh. This cross is erected by his wife and children.

' Blessed are the merciful.'
And Neville Edward Cornwall, son of E. C Legh, lieut., who died at Sydney, N. S. W., June 21st, 1902, aged 48. '

There is mercy with Thee.' Sacred to the memory of Lieut.-Col. E. C. Legh, C. B., H. M. 97th Regt. He died at Banda, June 3rd, 1859. This monument was erected by his brother officers as a mark of their respect and esteem. [There are here three inscriptions : two to Lieutenant-Colonel Legh, one by his wife and one by his brother officers, and one to his son. Edmund Cornwall Legh (1821-1859)was the son of G. J, Legh, of High Legh. He married Julia, daughter of Neville Parker of New Brunswick, and left a son, Neville Edmund Cornwall, (not Edward as in inscription), born 1854, and a daughter. The family traces its descent to Oswald de Lega of East Hall, Cheshire ; the date is not given but it was 11 generations before 1451, so that the family must be extremely old. The succession of H-gh Legh has been unbroken since at least the 7th generation.]
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Mon Oct 11, 2010 9:20 pm

Tom. Would Neville Edmund Cornwall Legh have been on involved in the slave trade. Has I have HMS London East Africa during that era.
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:37 pm

littlehand,

Yes, HMS London was at Zanzibar, on the East Coast of Africa, involved in the suppression of the slave trade. Legh was a Sub-Lieutenant at the time he was serving on board. He was mentioned in despatches for an incident in trying to apprehend slave traders. As a consequnece he was promoted to Lieutenant.

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Tue Oct 12, 2010 11:50 pm

Thanks Tom. Would he have been on-board the ship when the murder of Captain C.J. Brownrigg to place.
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Wed Oct 13, 2010 1:37 pm

littlehand,

Captain Brownrigg died in 1881. By that time Legh had already returned to England.

(Sorry for the short answers, but I am away from home on business and don't have access to my files.)

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Wed Oct 13, 2010 10:23 pm

Thanks Tom.

I trying to find out
Quote :
"He was mentioned in despatches for an incident in trying to apprehend slave traders. As a consequnece he was promoted to Lieutenant."
What he did to get promoted. Idea
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Wed Oct 13, 2010 10:51 pm

Been following this thread, I would also like to know what Cornwall Legh did to get promoted. I have been looking, but my P.C. Skills have a lot to be desired.
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Thu Oct 14, 2010 8:07 pm

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THE LONDON GAZETTE, MAY 11, 1883.
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Sat Oct 16, 2010 1:04 am

littlehand,

I can't find the original source right now but here is what I had on file for Lt. Legh:

"Legh, N. E. C., Sub-Lieutenant of the "London" 1878-79; actively employed in the suppressionof the slave trade on the East Coast of Africa; highly distinguished himself, and was several times under fire and mentioned in despatches and also by Sir John Kirk in his reports to the Foreign Office, and promoted to Lieutenant."

Here is an iInteresting piece of product promotion by Lieutenant Legh. It was a year after his retirement.

http://books.google.com/books?id=rxcAAAAAYAAJ&pg=PP12&zoom=3&hl=e#v=onepage&q&f=false

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Sat Oct 16, 2010 2:44 pm

Here is the original source for above:

65. LEGH, N. E. C, Sub-Lieutenant of the " London," 1878-79; actively employed in the suppression of the slave trade on the East Coast of Africa; highly distinguished himself, and was several times under fire and mentioned in despatches and also by Sir John Kirk in his reports to the Foreign Office, and promoted to Lieutenant. On his way home, on arrival at Delagoa Bay, volunteered for service in the Zulu war, and rendering important service by surveying the Mapnta River, and pacifying the Amatonga tribe ; received the thanks of General Sir Garnet Wolseley, Commander-in-Chief, and from the Admiralty the expression of their Lordships' satisfaction and approval (Zulu Medal); F.R.G.S. at the representation of Sir Bartle Frere. Vide Royal Humane Society's Medals.
(Taken from The Royal Navy List, January 1884, "War & Meritorious Service" section)

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Sat Oct 16, 2010 2:53 pm

littlehand,

This might have something to do with his promotion. (Legh was promoted to Lieutenant 22 Feb, 1879)

"Dr. Kirk to the Marquis of Salisbury.—{Received December 9.)

My Lord, Zanzibar, October 31, 1878.

I HAVE the honour to forward Decree of Condemnation in the case of thirty-five slaves taken on one of the outlying islands to the west of Pemba by Sub-Lieutenant Neville E. C. Legh, of Her Majesty's ship " London."

These slaves were all natives of Nyassa and the interior, and knew nothing of the coast dialect. They had been shipped from near Kilwa, and landed on the island where found the day previous to capture.
The officer, Sub-Lieutenant Legh, and interpreter, on this occasion behaved with much judgment in securing so many of the slaves, although fired on and attacked by the Arab guard, one of whom was disarmed and taken prisoner.

This Arab, a native of Oman, has been given over to the Sultan to undergo a rigorous punishment in irons in prison.

I have, &c.
(Signed) JOHN KIRK.

(Taken from Parliamentary Papers, Vol. LXVI, page 244)

Petty Officer Tom

Almost forgot!

Captain Charles James Brownrigg was Captain of HMS Euphrates during the Zulu War.
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Sat Oct 16, 2010 8:35 pm

Tom, Graves. Thanks for the replies and the time taken to search for the information. Idea I have been looking for his grave, but no luck. Guess i'm Relying on you again Graves. Idea
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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Sun Feb 26, 2017 11:40 pm

Neville Edmund Cornwall Legh was born on January 16, 1854, at Canterbury, Kent, to Brigadier Edmund Cornwall Legh and Julia Parker Legh.  On June 3, 1859 his father died of reported heatstroke in Banda, India where he commanded the 97th Regiment during the mutiny in India.
Legh entered the Royal Navy as Naval Cadet aboard HMS Britannia on December 12, 1867, and was advance to Midshipman on 20 October 20, 1869.  He received an appointment to the Corvette, HMS Clio, on the Australian Station, on March 22, 1870.  On April 22, 1874 Legh was promoted to Sub-Lieutenant before being sent later that year for study at Royal Naval College, Greenwich.  His next appointment was on May 6, 1875 as Sub-Lieutenant on the Gun Vessel HMS Bittern in the Mediterranean; then in January 5, 1876 to HMS Invincible on the same station; and to HMS Triumph, Flag Ship of the Second in Command in the Mediterranean, on August 22, 1876.  Legh, next served aboard HMS Swiftsure, in the Mediterranean on March 12, 1877, where, in December, 1877 a Court-Martial was held for Neville Edmund Cornwall Legh, Sub-Lieutenant, “Swiftsure,” charged with First, conduct unbecoming the character of an officer in drawing a bill which he did not meet.  Second, Ditto.  Third, conduct unbecoming the character of an officer in giving an I.O.U. to a gun room steward and not paying the amount before the steward left the ship. The sentence of the court-martial was the first and second charges partly proved, inasmuch as prisoner did not meet the bills which he had drawn, but although prisoner showed culpable neglect in this money matter it was not proved he was guilty of conduct unbecoming of an officer.  Third charge not proved.  He was adjudged to forfeit 18 months’ seniority, and to be dismissed from H.M.S. Swiftsure.   He was next appointed on December 12, 1877 as Sub-Lieutenant on HMS London (Store Ship, Zanzibar) where he was actively employed in the suppression of the slave trade on the East Coast of Africa.  Legh highly distinguished himself, and was several times under fire and mentioned in despatches, and also by Sir John Kirk in his reports to the Foreign Office.  On February 27, 1879 He received a promotion to Lieutenant.  
In May 1879, on his way back to England, he stopped off at Delagoa Bay, where a former ship mate, Lieutenant O’Neill was the British Counsel.  Legh volunteered to accompany O’Neill on a survey of the Maputa River, and pacification of the Amatonga tribe. On June 10th, a newspaper correspondent, at Durban, wrote “by the last steamer from Delagoa Bay I learn that two leading Indunas of the Amatonga tribe are proceeding to Maritzburg with instructions from the chiefs to enter into negotiations with the Government which it will, it is hoped, ensure the neutrality of that tribe during the war, and may result in their lending their assistance.  The following are the circumstances which have led to the dispatch of these strangers, as I have learnt.  Captain O’Neill, R.N., and Lieutenant Legh, R.N., who have just returned from a trip into the Tonga country, which was undertaken in order to ascertain the capabilities for transport of the Maputa river, and to discover as much as possible the part that the Amatonga were taking with regard to the war, hearing whilst on the river that an Induna from Cetewayo was at the Royal Kraal with most urgent requests for the King’s uncles, in whom the power during the minority of the Amatonga King is chiefly vested, to join him at once with all the forces at their command.  Captain O’Neill secured an interview with the chiefs.  After two lengthy interviews, at which the three leaders of the tribe were present, Captain O’Neill succeeded in inducing them to delay their decision, and finally two indunas were sent by the chiefs to Natal as an earnest if their desire to continue upon friendly terms with us.  The contingent that the Amatongas would be able to send to Cetewayo is variously estimated at between 6,000 and 8,000 men, most of whom would be armed with guns.  This would be an important increase to the Zulu army.  There is little doubt, however, that if their belief, which is as yet unshaken, in the invincibility of Cetewayo can be lessened, his chance of support on this ground would proportionately decrease, and much therefore will be gained by temporizing with them until some signal success has been gained by the British.  The visit of the Indunas to Natal, where they will have the opportunity of seeing the military preparations for war cannot fail also to have a good effect in impressing them with our power.”  (Source:  The Evening News, Portsmouth, Monday, July 7, 1879.)  For his service in the Zulu War Lieutenant Legh received the thanks of General Sir Garnet Wolseley, Commander-in-Chief, and from the Admiralty the expression of their Lordships' satisfaction and approval, South Africa Medal, no clasp.
Legh returned to England on October 5,1879 on Hired Transport “German,” the same ship on which Lord Chelmsford and Lieutenant, R.N., A. B. Milne returned.  On December 9, 1879 Lieutenant Legh was appointed to HMS Audacious (Double Screw Iron Ship, Coastguard Service, River Humber.)   On July 5, 1880 W. Page, A.B., fell from the fore top crosstrees into the sea off Portland, breaking his thigh and becoming unconscious; Lieutenant. Legh jumped from the netting with all his clothes on, and with the assistance of Mr. A. Johnston, Boatswain, supported the man for about 5 minutes, until the arrival of the copper punt from the other side of the ship. Legh received an award of a Testimonial, inscribed on Vellum, from Royal Humane Society.  Lieutenant Edmund Cornwall Legh was presented to the Prince of Wales, At the Queen’s Levee, on May 31, 1880.  On January 18, 1881 he was appointed Lieutenant on HMS Rifleman (Composite Gun Vessel, South East Coast of America.)  Then, on September 30, 1881 he was appointed to the Royal Naval College, for study, and borne on HMS President (West India Docks.)   Legh was next appointed on March 21, 1883 a Lieutenant on HMS Valorous, but on May 9, 1883 he was placed on the Retired List.  Legh was elected a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (F.R.G.S.) on November 26, 1883.  In July, 1885 Legh’s name was removed from the Retired List.
On June 12, 1886 the following notice appeared in the “Hampshire Advertise County Newspaper”:  “Assault – Mr. N. E. C. Legh, described by Mr. E. D. Godwin, who prosecuted, as a man of independent means, and formerly in the Royal Navy, was charged with an attempt to commit an indecent assault on J. H. Thorpe, aged 10, at the Old Market Inn.  The evidence of the lad justified the bench in committing prisoner for trial at the Assizes, and bail was refused.  The inquiry was conducted privately.”  Legh was held at the Castle of Winchester.  On August 20, 1886 a second article appeared in the “Carlisle Patriot” newspaper.  “At Winchester Azzises, before Mr Justice Hawkins, Neville Edmund Cornwall Legh, 32, was charged with having committed an abominable crime.  Mr Charles Mathews prosecuted; the Hon. B. Coleridge defended.  The prisoner was formerly a lieutenant in the Navy, and had recently been living in Winchester.  The evidence of a boy and his mother having been heard, after two hours’ deliberation the jury found the prisoner guilty of having attempted to commit the crime.  There were three other indictments against him for two similar offences.  Mr Coleridge asked his lordship to read some certificates respecting the prisoner’s past history before passing sentence, and stated among other things that the prisoner was a member of the Royal Geographical Society and had received the Royal Humane Society’s medal for saving life at sea.  His lordship said he would do so, but at the same time it must be remembered that he should also have to consider what had been proved against the prisoner and the other charges against him. Later on the prisoner was brought up for sentence.  His lordship asked if he wished to say anything.  He replied that he had only one thing to say, which was that some years ago he had received any injury to his head which must in some way have affected his brain.  He had no recollection of anything of which he had been found guilty.  His lordship said it was one of the saddest cases that had ever come under his notice.  The jury had taken a very merciful and lenient view of the case.  He had read all of the certificates handed to him with a view of seeing if he could find any mitigating circumstances, but he confessed with great pain that he could find none.  He had no alternative but to sentence the prisoner to ten years’ penal servitude.”  The 1891 census shows Legh to be a “Convict (Prisoner)” at her Majesty’s Prison, Parkhurst, Isle of Wight
In December, 1897 E.C. Legh, F.R.G.S. was at Kalgoorlie, Western Australia.  On March 4, 1898 Edmond Legh was remanded at Kalgoolie on a charge, which was later withdrawn, regarding his possession of a rug; and accused of having insufficient lawful mean of support.  He was allowed to go with advice from the Bench to try and get some employment.  The accused said he was being sent money from England, and expected another remittance by the English mail which reached Albany a couple of days ago.
On June 23, 1899 E.C. Legh appeared before the bench in Freemantle, Western Australia, charged with drunkenness.  He was cautioned by the court and discharged.  On July 7, 1899 he again appeared before the bench in Freemantle charged with having been drunk.  He was remanded for 8 days for medical treatment.  On August 4, 1899 Legh was charged for the third time in Freemantle with having been drunk.  He was cautioned by the court and discharged.  On
August 7, 1899 Edward Cornwall Legh pled guilty to having been drunk, and was sentenced by the court at Freemantle to pay a fine of 10s, or serve 7 days imprisonment.  On August 18, 1899 Legh, once more, plead guilty in court at Freemantle to having been drunk the day before.  He was sentenced to 3 days in prison.
On the 21st of June, 1902 Neville E. C. Legh died in Sydney, N. S. W., Australia.  He is commemorated on his father’s memorial in Banda, India, “Neville Edward Cornwall, son of E. C Legh, lieut., who died at Sydney, N. S. W., June 21st, 1902, aged 48.”

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Tue Feb 28, 2017 8:09 pm

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Canterbury Journal, Kentish Times and Farmers' Gazette 21 August 1886

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Tue Feb 28, 2017 8:42 pm

I know this is not Zulu War but shows the family ended on a better note.

Mary Helena Cornwall Legh, (20 May 1857 – 18 December 1941) also known as ("Nellie" Cornwall Legh) was a British Anglican missionary, who late in life devoted herself to the welfare, education and medical care of leprosy patients in Kusatsu, Gunma Prefecture, Japan.

Cornwall Legh was born in 1857 at Canterbury, England, into a prominent Cheshire family. Her father, Brigadier Edmund Cornwall Legh O.B. was a decorated veteran of British military campaigns in Crimea and India. He died of reported heat stroke in India at the age of 37 when Mary was only two years old.

Cornwall Legh's early years were spent with her widowed mother and younger brother Neville at her uncle, George Cornwall Legh M.P.'s estate at High Legh in Cheshire. She regularly visited London and in later life credited the influence of Rev. George Wilkinson then Vicar at St. Peter's Church, Eaton Square with her lifelong interest in overseas Christian mission work. She traveled widely in Europe with her mother Julia, became a published children's author, studied music and drawing in France, education, economics, languages and English literature graduating in 1886 with an LLA degree from St. Andrew's University in Scotland. After traveling around the world with her mother Julia in 1892 and 1893, briefly visiting Japan en route, Cornwall Legh and her mother settled in the village of Hamble-le-Rice near Southampton.

Following the death of her mother in 1907, Cornwall Legh made the decision to become a self-financed SPG missionary. Having almost no surviving family relatives in England, she travelled to Japan in 1907 at the age of 50. The first eight years of Cornwall Legh's missionary work in Japan was spent in the service of the Nippon Sei Ko Kai Diocese of South Tokyo, notably at St. Andrew's Cathedral (Yokohama) and St. Barnabas' Church, Ushigome. Despite inheriting a large fortune, she was noted for the simplicity of her dress, empathy and communication with Japanese of varied social status and appreciation of modest local food.

In 1915, Cornwall Legh visited Kusatsu at the request of a Christian belonging to the Koenkai (Light and salt society), which had been established under the influence of Hannah Riddell noted for her work at the Kaishun Hospital for leprosy patients in Kumamoto. Cornwall Legh investigated the Kusatsu Hot Spring, one of the gathering spots of leprosy patients. It was a problematic town where hundreds of leprosy patients gathered, mainly in the Yunosawa district, to find a cure or temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. The leprosy sufferers were seen as an unwelcome presence by many in the town and often led impoverished lives without access to regular employment or medical care. Dr. Francois-Xavier Bertrand head of the Koyama Fukusei Hospital in Gotemba had first attempted to set up a hospital facility in the town in 1900, but met with immediate opposition.

Cornwall Legh started missionary work at Kusatsu in 1916. In the same year she established a kindergarten and a women's dormitory "Family of Love", in a building previously used as a ryokan. In 1917, she established a clinic (Dr. Kesa Hattori, Nurse Chiyo Mikami), followed by various homes and schools. The administration of the mission and all buildings were financially paid by her, although in later years, fundraising was also conducted in Japan, Britain and the United States.
In 1929, Tomekichi Matsumoto, a company president donated enough money for the building of a new clinic and the salary of a doctor for 10 years.

Chiyo Mikami, previously a nurse of Zensho Hospital and appointed as the nurse of the "Family of Love" dormitory of the St. Barnabas' Mission, advised to open a clinic. Dr. Kesako Hattori came and St. Barbanas' Hospital was opened.

In the 1930s the Japanese Government began to establish residential care facilities for leprosy sufferers, opening the Kuryu Rakusen-en Sanatorium in Kusatsu in 1932. While welcoming the role of government in the provision of health services, Cornwall Legh also expressed concern as many leprosy patients previously hospitalized in the St. Barnabas' Hospital were against the closure of the facilities.

Cornwall Legh celebrated her 77th birthday in 1939 returning briefly to England on the account of health problems. Her leadership role at the St. Barnabas' Mission was taken over by Mary B. Magill. After returning to Japan, Cornwall Legh lived at the warmer location of Akashi, Hyogo Prefecture. The St. Barnabas' Hospital was officially closed on 13 April 1941. Cornwall Legh died on 18 December 1941 at Akashi.

St. Barnabus' Church, the adjoining memorial museum and Cornwall Legh Park in Kusatsu attest to the charitable legacy of Mary Cornwall Legh and the history of the community she sought to serve.

In 2007, on the 150th Anniversary of her birth, a bust of Cornwall Legh was unveiled in Kusatsu in the presence of the British Ambassador to Japan, Sir Graham Holbrooke-Fry.

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PostSubject: Re: Neville Edmund Cornwall-Legh, Lieutenant, Royal Navy   Wed Mar 01, 2017 6:29 pm

Wonderful story. Salute
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