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 Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War

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Petty Officer Tom

Petty Officer Tom

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PostSubject: Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War   Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War EmptyTue Jun 11, 2019 6:44 pm

ROYAL MARINES OF THE NAVAL BRIGADE
“Per Mare Per Terram”

By
Tom Hyde

   
    The Royal Navy received little notice for the part it played in the Zulu War, and the Royal Marines who served ashore with the Naval Brigade received even less.
    Royal Marine Light Infantry serving aboard ship at the time of the Zulu War were usually drawn from the divisional barracks located at the same port as the ship to which they were assigned.  These divisions were Portsmouth, Plymouth and Chatham.  Men of the Royal Marine Artillery also served aboard ship and came from the Royal Marine Artillery Barracks at Eastney, Portsmouth.
     The marines that formed part of the Naval Brigade detachments from the different ships during the Zulu War wore a working uniform when serving ashore in a military operation.  The Royal Marine Light Infantry were in a 4 buttoned blue patrol jacket with a red embroidered bugle on the collar and red twisted shoulder cords.  The buttons were gilt domed with an anchor topped with a crown in the center, surrounded with “Royal Marine Light Infantry” which in turn was surrounded by a wreath.  (One of these buttons was found to the north of the laager site at Gingindlovu, and is on display at the Mtonjaneni Zulu Historical Museum, KwaZulu Natal.)  The remainder of the uniform included blue pants with thin red stripe down the outside of each leg, black leather belt and ammo pouches, black boots and black leggings and white helmets. The men of the Royal Marine Artillery were dressed in the 4 buttoned blue patrol jacket with red “grenade” device on the collar and blue pants, with wide red stripe down the outside of the legs.  The remainder of their uniform was the same as the R.M.L.I.  When not wearing the helmets, the RMLI wore glengarries which were dark blue with leather binding, the badge being a brass globe within a laurel wreath and a stringed bugle horn above.  The R.M.A. had forage caps or the dark blue “pill box” style cap with a yellow band and button on top and a brass badge in front which included a grenade on each side of the anchor encircled with “Royal Marine Artillery.”   These would have been replaced with the helmet when their detachment crossed into Zululand.  All the marines were issued the white helmet.  The issued weapons of the marines were the Martini-Henry rifle and the Army Infantry Sergeant’s sword type bayonet.
     As the Zulu War was becoming imminent the commanding officer of the British forces in South Africa requested a Naval Brigade from HMS Active to be sent ashore and supplement the forces at Fort Pearson on the Natal side of the Lower Tugela River.  41 marines under Lieutenant Dowding, R.M.L.I., were landed at Durban from HMS Active as part of that ship’s Naval Brigade on 19 November 1878.  Most of these men were experienced, having served previously in the 9th Cape Frontier Wars in 1877 and 1878.
    A delegation of Zulus arrived at Fort Pearson on December 11th to listen to the British Ultimatum.  An honor guard was provided for the occasion with 20 marines under Lieutenant Dowding, and 20 sailors and an officer of the Naval Brigade    
    When it was decided that the “Active’s” Naval Brigade would accompany the field forces of Number One Column into Zululand another detachment to the Naval Brigade was sent ashore on 1 January 1879, from HMS Tenedos, to take over the duties at Fort Pearson, and later at the newly erected fort on the Zulu side of the river to be named Fort Tenedos.  They would remain there until becoming part of a relief column in late March.  Colour-Sergeant John Pardon, R.M.L.I. was in command of the 14 marines assigned to that contingent.    
    On January 18 1879 “Active’s” marines under Lieutenant Dowding, set out with the rest of Number One Column of Lord Chelmsford’s forces proceeding into Zulu Land.  The marines were detailed to the rear of the 1st Division of the column along with the ship’s Gatling gun which they were assigned to protect.
    The marines of “Active” fought in the Battle of Inyezane, which occurred on January 22nd, and were positioned first on the right flank toward the rear, and then on the knoll positioned to the left of the Gatling gun.  They later joined with half of Company B of the Naval Brigade in support of the final assault on the Zulu position on Wombane.
    The following is the report of Lieutenant Dowding, R.M.L.I., written the day after the battle.  I have the honour to report that in accordance with orders, I marched the Marines from the camping ground near the Amatikulu, on the morning of the 22nd inst., in rear of the Gatling gun.  After marching about 2 ½ hours we heard rapid firing commencing at the front of the column; almost at the same instant an officer of the Native Contingent rode up to me, reporting that the enemy were in large numbers on our right.  Immediately told Captain Forster of the Buffs, who was in command of the rear guard.  He ordered us to extend on the right flank of the wagons, at the same time the Gatling gun was brought into action.  I advanced the Marines in line with a Company of the Buffs under Captain Foster, but owing to the height of the reeds and bush we only occasionally got a glimpse of the enemy about 400 yards in front of us, and apparently, in large numbers. They appeared to be trying to get around the rear of the column. I was able occasionally to open fire at them on arriving at the edge of the reeds.  After advancing in this way about a quarter of a mile, we found another company of the Buffs, moving from the front of the column, and some 300 yards to our front. I therefore at once moved my men back on the Gatling gun, and made my way at once to the Head Quarter Staff, and reported my arrival to Colonel Pearson.  He ordered Mr. Coker to bring up the Gatling gun at once. I was told to place my men at the top of the hill to the left of the Gatling gun, when I at once opened fire on the enemy, who were keeping up a fairly continuous fire in our direction.  The Gatling gun shortly opening fire on our right; after about a quarter of an hour Mr. Craigie rode up with half of "B" Company, saying he had orders to bring up the rest of the Naval Brigade to support "A" Company, and as the Gatling gun was now well guarded, I at once joined him with the Marines.  We moved rapidly along to the kraal on the top of the hill that had been already taken, where we found the remainder of "B" Company, keeping up a continuous fire at the enemy on our left, and then advanced on the main road, up a steep hill, until we joined Mr. Hamilton's men.  The men behaved well and steadily under fire.  The marching at the commencement in extended order being very heavy through the thick bush and reeds.  The amount of ammunition expended was between 500 and 600 rounds.”  The following from the diary of Marine Gunner John Carroll, R.M.A. gives us an enlisted man’s viewpoint of the battle.  “The marines that were rear guard in charge of Gatling when the action commenced opened out in skirmishing order when the firing commenced getting among some thick reeds and bushes heavily fatiguing. Seeing there was no danger of an attack in rear and leaving two companies of buffs and engineers to protect the rear we went forward with gatling in a short time getting on the same knoll on which the artillery and rockets were placed, but the gatling took a little higher position on a ridge and opened fire on a clump of bush from which a heavy fire was directed upon us.  The Gatling soon cleansed the bush by a well-directed fire. The marines then joined the remainder of the brigade who were flanking the enemy on the ridges, we were exposed to a heavy fire from our front and a high ridge on our right, for about half an hour, but succeeded in getting on the ridge on our right, flanking the enemy and driving them completely off.”  Number One Column reached the old mission station Eshowe on the 23rd.  The marines from “Active” were busy daily, first, with working on construction of the fort, clearing the surrounding area of brush, and digging a deep trench around the fortification.  When not busy with construction on the fort they took their turn guarding the cattle, and later, helping with the building of the new road intended to shorten the distance to the fort by the relief column. They were to become besieged in the fortified mission for over two months, cut off from the rest of the British and Colonial force.  They had no tents and were forced to sleep out in the open.  Food became scarce and rationing was started.  The weather was bad, men suffering from the heat and from heavy rains.  Illness set in, medicines became in short supply and men began to die.  The Royal Marines lost one man to illness and several others were taken sick during this time.
   On 1 March 1879 Lieutenant Dowding and 40 of his marines accompanied a sortie to burn a Zulu kraal, and on the return to Eshowe they provide cover for the rest of the force from the Zulus.  He wrote of the sortie in a letter.  “About the end of Feb. the Colonel decided on taking half the garrison to burn a large military kraal of Cetywayo's, about seven miles off. We were about 600 strong, including one gun. I went with my men, being the only one of the naval brigade. We started at 2 am. (quite dark of course) and arrived at daybreak within half-a-mile of the kraal, when we were seen by a Zulu from a small kraal near. We soon heard the war-cry echoing along the hills, but in a few minutes we came in sight of the kraal (very large, capable of holding some thousands) and, after sending a shell into it we rushed in, the few Zulus clearing out pretty fast, and in a few minutes every hut was in flames. Dabulemanzi, the great chief, was at his kraal watching less than a mile off—but, as it was a most difficult place to get at, in fact only Cavalry could have done it, we commenced our return.  The whole way back we were fired at by some 400 or 500 Zulus from the neighbouring hills, but their bullets whistled harmlessly over us, or fell a long way short. I was sent with my few men to the top of a small hill to drive off some Zulus that had been annoying us. When I arrived at the top nothing was to be seen, but all at once a volley from at least 10 guns (I won’t say rifles for they made such a noise) was fired at us from less than 300 yards off, making no end of a whistle over our heads — we laid down pretty quick — I luckily had detected two puffs of smoke from a tree just below us but across a deep ravine. I told off six of the best shots at once to the spot, and the volley brought down two of the gentlemen, the remainder must have been in the bush, the other side, and cleared off, as only one or two wild shots were fired off after that. On the way back however as I was in front as escort to the gun, the Colonel told me to fire a shot at a small Clump of men over a little hill, nearly a 1000 yards of. The men sighted for 950 yards, and we saw 4 Zulus distinctly drop — of course it was a very chance-shot, as at that distance no certainty could be made.”
    HMS Shah was on her voyage from the Pacific back to England when she was diverted to South Africa.  A Naval Brigade contingent was landed ashore at Durban on 7 March 1879 as one of the first reinforcements for the war, including 67 of her Royal Marines under the command of Captain Joseph Philips. R.M.L.I. with Captain Alexander L. S. Scott, R.M.A. as second in command.  When the sailors of “Shah” left Durban for the Lower Tugela the marine detachment was ordered to remain behind and was assigned as part of the defense of Durban until other reinforcements began arriving from England.  
    On the 13th of March Captain Philips led the marines out of Durban to rejoin the Naval Brigade at the front. The “Shah’s” marines reached the Lower Tugela on the 17th and crossed the river where they pitched camp next to the rest of the Naval Brigade and others of Lord Chelmsford’s force being assembled for the relief of Eshowe.   On the 18th the marines of “Shah” replaced the Tenedos detachment of the Naval Brigade holding Fort Tenedos.
    The last of the marines to be landed ashore for service with the Naval Brigade were 35 of HMS Boadicea’s marines under the command of Lieutenant J. W. Robyns, R.M.L.I.  They were put ashore at Durban on March 18 as part of that ship’s contingent to the Naval Brigade. Their arrival had been delayed by an outbreak of smallpox which required the ship to be held in quarantine from January 28th.  Only 4 of “Boadicea’s” marines were afflicted by the disease and all four recovered, but were not sent ashore for service in the Naval Brigade.
    Captain J. Philips received orders to move “Shah’s” marines up to strengthen the defenses of the outpost at the St. Andrews mission on March 24th.   There was a signaling station nearby the mission that maintained contact with the forces at Fort Eshowe.  
    On 28 March the “Shah” marines were ordered back down to the Naval Brigade camp on the Zulu side of the Tugela.  
    When the relief column set out for Eshowe on 29 March the marine detachments from “Boadicea” and “Tenedos” were put under Captain Philips’ command and formed part of the 2nd Division.
    At the Battle of Gingindlovo, 2 April 1879, the marines from “Shah” and “Tenedos” helped defend the northeast (front right) corner of the square under Lieutenant Robyns, and the marines from “Boadicea” were at the northwest (front left) corner under Captain Burrowes, with Captain Philips in overall command both companies of marines.
    Captain J. Philips, R.M.L.I., later wrote in a report that “On the morning of the 2nd April, when in laager at Ginginhlovo, immediately after daylight, we were attacked by a large force of Zulus, estimated at 15,000 men, selected from the King’s best fighting regiments, who surrounded our laager, and advanced over very broken ground in most admirable style.  The force of Royal Marines, which I had previously formed into two companies were stationed at the two front angles of the trench surrounding the laager, as a guard for the rockets and the Gatling gun of H.M.S. ‘Boadicea,’ No. 1 Company, left front, under Capt. Burrowes, R.M.A., and No. 2, right front, under Lieut. Robyns, R.M.L.I.  The first attack was made upon the right front angle of the laager, and in the most determined manner, a number of the enemy skirmishing splendidly, and advancing to within 21 paces of the trench; but so steady was the fire from both the Gatling gun and No. 2 Company of the Royal Marines that the Zulus were unable to form for their rush, the usual method adopted by them, nor were they able to use their assegais at close quarters.  Lieut. Colonel Northey, who was in command of the 60th Rifles, occupying the front face, between my two companies, was shot at my side, whilst talking to me, and died from his wound three days later.  The fight which commenced at 6.10 a.m. lasted for rather more than an hour, when the Zulus, unable to approach at any point of the laager nearer than they did to its front face, turned and fled, pursued by the mounted men and the Native Contingent, and were soon seen retreating over the hills in all directions.  The conduct of officers, non-commissioned officers, and men was most satisfactory throughout the engagement, all being very cool, and the men firing with great steadiness and precision.  By Lord Chelmsford’s orders the dead were subsequently counted, within a radius of 800 yards of the trench, when 108 bodies were found in front of the two small portions manned by Royal Marines.  These we had subsequently to bury, each regiment and corps performing that office for those fallen in front of their own trench.  The total Zulus loss in killed was upwards of 1,500, and many wounded were afterwards found seven and eight miles from the scene of the action.  I am glad to be able to state that our only casualty amongst the Royal Marines engaged was that of Bombardier Parfitt, RMA, of H.M.S. ‘Boadicea’, who was severely wounded in the shoulder.”
    The Medical Journal for HMS Boadicea recorded “Frank Parfitt, aged 26, Bombardier Royal Marine Artillery; disease or hurt, gun shot wound right arm and shoulder. Put on sick list, 2 April 1879, at the Battle of Ginginhlovo [Gingindlovu]. Discharged from the base hospital at Durban to the Royal Naval Hospital, Simon's Bay, 2 May 1879, and subsequently invalided. A pension certificate was awarded.”
    On 3 April Lord Chelmsford, leading the Relief column, set out from Gingindlovu for Eshowe.  A portion of the Naval Brigade was included in this column, composed of one company of 40 blue jackets to man the Gatling and a battery of rocket tubes. There were two companies of marines under the overall command of Captain J. Philips, one company to guard the two rocket tubes and one company to guard the Gatling, with Captain A. L. S. Burrowes in command of one company and Lieutenant J. Robyns in command of the second.   3 marines, who were on the sick list, were left behind at Gingindlovu camp.
    Sergeant Whittaker, Royal Marine Artillery, recounted the march – “We then struggled on our journey, thinking Pearson was starving, and struggled under the weight of our ammunition, great coats, and belts, until as the Marines entered Ekowe with the last rocket cart, it was striking mid-night.  We had been on our legs, marching up hills, down hills, and around them, through rivers waist deep, and through marshes for 17 hours, with nothing to eat, and nothing but the sky to cover us for our bed.  But thanks to the Marines of the Active, they were waiting for us with some good hot coffee.”
    Two days later Lord Chelmsford’s flying column, with the detachment of sailors and marines from “Shah” and “Boadicea,” started its march back to the camp at Gingindlovu, but had to halt and form a laager for the night having travelled only about half way.
    On the morning of 6 April at 3:30 a.m. there was a false alarm in the camp of the relief column.  Captain Philips, R.M.L.I. reported that “when in laager, on the morning of the 6th, there occurred a false alarm, attended with disastrous results, for, on its being raised, before daylight, a number of the Native Contingent rushed in, accompanied by some of the 60th outlying picquet, and, in the scare created, 13 of these were either shot or bayoneted as they came into the trench.  I cannot speak too highly of Royal Marines in that quarter, for, though the firing took place on their immediate right, and several of the picquet ran in over our trench, every man stood steadily to his arms without attempting to use them.  We reached the old Ginginhlovo laager the same afternoon, but proceeded to a new one, two miles off, the former one being considered unhealthy”
    After the relief of Eshowe the marines of Boadicea, Shah and Tenedos remained at the new camp at Gingindlovu and the following month at the newly erected Fort Chelmsford, except for the sick who were sent down to the Tugela camps. The marines of HMS Active were sent directly down to the Tugela River along with the rest of the Eshowe occupants when they were relieved.  In May the marines and the rest of the Naval Brigade contingent from HMS Tenedos received orders to return to their ship which had received orders to return to England for repairs.  Toward the end of May there were only 68 marines from the “Shah” and “Boadicea” detachments at Fort Chelmsford and another 51 marines from “Active” “Boadicea” and “Shah” at the Lower Tugela.  The remaining marines were either sick in the hospital, or in camp, unavailable for duty.  On 28 May Captain Philips, referring to the conditions at Fort Chelmsford wrote “Another long stay was made here, a most detrimental delay for the health of the column, much sickness setting in, owing to the impure state of the water from the river Inyezane, and large convoys of sick being sent down weekly to the base hospital, suffering from fever and dysentery, and from this cause I lost the services of nearly all my non-commissioned officers and over 50 men.”
    On 17 June 1879 General Crealock’s column began the march to Port Durnford.  The Naval Brigade from HMS Active including Lieutenant Dowding’s marines accompanied the column.
    Two days later the Column reached Fort Chelmsford.  There, all the marines were put under Captain J. Philips, with those of “Active” and “Boadicea” forming one company and those of “Shah” forming the second company.  On the way to Port Durnford the marines helped make the road and provided cover when crossing the rivers.  After reaching Port Durnford they were left to more mundane duties of providing men for escort at the welcoming of surrendering Zulu Chiefs and helping with the unloading of supplies from surf boats on the beach.  The final military incursion deeper into Zululand for the marines was on 5 July when Brigadier General Clarke crossed the Umhlatoosi River for a three day reconnaissance, with a force which included 50 men of the Naval Brigade contingents from “Active” and “Boadicea,” comprised of 25 blue jackets and 25 marines, with a Gatling and one field gun.  During the reconnaissance they saw some Zulus, but were not engaged in any conflicts.
    With the war winding down the Naval Brigades received orders to return to their ships.  The first to depart were those sailors and marines from HMS Active and HMS Shah who embarked from Port Durnford on July 21 1879 by transport ship for the return to their own ships.  On 27 July the Naval Brigade contingent, including the marines, from HMS Boadicea were transported from Port Durnford for return to their own ship.
    During their time ashore only one marine was injured in combat, many others of the marines, like their navy companions, suffered from illnesses brought about by weather and climate, from which 5 marines died, and others had to be sent to hospitals on the Natal side of the Tugela River (Fort Pearson, Herwen Hospital, and Durban Hospital.)  Some of the more serious cases were sent to the Royal Naval Hospital at Simons Bay, and in some cases invalided to Haslar Hospital at Portsmouth.  
    After returning to Portsmouth in October 1879 the marines of the Her Majesty’s Ships Active and Shah were among those who were invited to the Soldiers and Sailors Banquet in Portsmouth for those who had returned from the Zulu War.  In attendance were about 50 marines from “Shah” and 20 from “Active” including Sgt. W. S. Blackman, “Active” who had been invalided home after the relief of Eshowe along with Pte. F. Melluish and Bugler T. Cook.  F. Parfitt, Royal Marine Artillery, HMS Boadicea, who had been invalided home after being wound at the Battle of Gingindlovu was also  present.
    2 December 1879 the Legislative Council of Natal passed the following resolution which the Speaker forwarded to the First Lord Commissioner of the Admiralty.
    “Sir,—I am commanded by the Honourable the Legislative Council of this Colony, to transmit to you the accompanying Resolution, which passed the Council this day, expressive of their high appreciation of the services rendered by Her Majesty’s Royal Marine Forces during the recent war in Zululand; and I am to request that you will make the same known to the officers and men of those forces engaged in that war.”
    Memorials were erected in Victoria Park, Portsmouth to those men of HMS Active and HMS Shah who died during the ships commissions.  The Active Memorial contains the names of Gunner (R.M.A.) W. Seddon and Private (R.M.L.I.) W. Stagg for the Zulu War.  The Shah Memorial contains the names of Gunner (R.M.A.) P. Crumpton and Private (R.M.L.I.) P. O'Brins for the Zulu War.
    There were 30 South Africa Medals with “1877-8-9” clasp issued to the marines of “Active” plus 12 medals with the “1879” clasp.  15 medals were issued with the “1879” clasp to the marines of “Tenedos”, 69 medals with “1879” clasp to the marines of “Shah”, and 36 medals with the “1879” clasp to the marines of “Boadicea”.
    The below list shows the amount of pay the Royal Marines received for service ashore in the Naval Brigade during the Zulu War.

Rank and Rate of Pay Per day
Drummer or Bugler (R.M.L.I.) 1s 0d
Private (R.M.L.I.) 1s 2d
Gunner (R.M.A.) 1s 5¼d
Drummer or Bugler (R.M.A.) 1s 5¼d
Corporal (R.M.L.I.) 1s 6d
Bombardier (R.M.A.) 2s 2d
Corporal (R.M.A.) 2s 2d
Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) 2s 2d
Sergeant (R.M.A.) 3s 0d
Colour-Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) 2s 8d
Colour-Sergeant (R.M.A.) 3s 6d

    Additionally the men received Good Conduct Pay of 1d per day for each Good Conduct badge they had earned.  A marine could receive up to 6 badges.  Sergeants and Colour-Sergeants were not eligible for Good Conduct Pay.
    For service ashore with the Naval Brigade in a military operation a marine was entitled to an allowance of 6d per day.
    In February 1880 a Grant of £3 13s was given to each marine who actually landed ashore with the Naval Brigade detachments from HM Ships “Active”, “Shah” and “Tenedos”.
    On 1 August 1880 a General Order was prepared for the issuance of a medal for the wars in South Africa, including the Zulu War.  The issuance of the medal was to include the Naval Brigade which consisted of blue-jackets and marines from the ships “Active,” “Boadicea,” “Shah,” and “Tenedos.”  The following year the Royal Marines began receiving their medals.


The following is a list of Royal Marines (Light Infantry and Artillery) who were sent ashore for service with the Naval Brigade during the Zulu War.  The list is by ship in chronological order of their landing, with the dates the marine detachment from that ship served ashore.  Next are the men who made up the marine detachment. The Officers are listed first, followed by the NCOs and then Other Ranks.  Information on each marine include their Register number (if known), rank, name of the individual, the division from which he was drawn, age when landed ashore for the Zulu War, and the number of years service in the Royal Marines at the time he was sent ashore.  At the end is the medal and clasp to which they were entitled, some are followed by a notation that shows the medal still exists.  Those that state the medal is “in a private collection” indicate those that have been sold at auction over the past 25 years, and occasionally show up at various auctions again.


HMS ACTIVE
Marines who served ashore with the Naval Brigade from 19 November 1878 to 21 July 1879

Officers
Lieutenant (R.M.L.I.) Townley Ward Dowding, Portsmouth Division, age 31, 13 years of service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)

NCOs
#145 Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) William Stephen Blackman, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 7 years service; invalided back to Portsmouth, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) Arthur Hollis, Portsmouth Division, age 37, 19 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Corporal (R.M.L.I.) John Botwood, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp

Other Ranks
#1009 Private (R.M.L.I.) James Arnott, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#365 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Bates, Portsmouth Division, age 25, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#390 Private (R.M.L.I.) William Bigwood, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) William Brown (aka: W. R. J. Coles), Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1141 Private (R.M.L.I.) Charles Henry Cardell, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Gunner (R.M.A.) John Carroll, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 28, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#1095 Private (R.M.L.I.) Walter Chapple, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in the National Maritime Museum collection)
#476 Private (R.M.L.I.) James Cook, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#32 Bugler (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Henry Cook, Portsmouth Division, age 28, 13 years service, invalided back to Portsmouth, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#725 Gunner (R.M.A.) Joseph Dale, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 23, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Christopher Davies, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#194 Private (R.M.L.I.) William Ellard, Portsmouth Division, age 30, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) Cornelius Fleming, Portsmouth Division, age 29, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Stephen Iggulden, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#915 Gunner (R.M.A.) Thomas Kilshaw, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#927 Gunner (R.M.A.) William Lemmon, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 23, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Marshall, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Charles May, Chatham Division, age 27, 8 years service South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#736 Private (R.M.L.I.) Frederick Melluish, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 3 years service, invalided back to Portsmouth, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Edward Metyard, Portsmouth Division, age 26, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#268 Private (R.M.L.I.) Walter Neale, Portsmouth Division, age 28, 9 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Louis Penketh, Portsmouth Division, age 20, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#803 Private (R.M.L.I.) William Pepperell, Portsmouth Division, age 26, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) Henry Pratt, Portsmouth Division, age 26, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Rayner, Portsmouth Division, age 29, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#859 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Scanlon, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) William Seddon, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 22, 5 years service; died of pneumonia 2 January 79 at Fort Pearson, buried in Fort Pearson cemetery, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) Robert Shields, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 27, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) James Smith, age 20, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#884 Private (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Smith, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Smith, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Stagg, Portsmouth Division, Age 22, 5 years service, died of pneumonia at Eshowe 16 March 1879, buried in Fort Eshowe cemetery, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#531 Bombardier (R.M.A.) Benjamin Trenchard, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, Age 28, 19 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#930 Private (R.M.L.I.) George Spratt Viney, Portsmouth Division, Age 21, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Warren, Age 27, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) W. H. Williams, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Edward Wilson, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
#3182 Private (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Woolfenden, Portsmouth Division, Age 24, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp


HMS BOADICEA
Marines who served ashore with the Naval Brigade 18 March 1879 – 27 July 1879

Officers
Lieutenant John Wilmot Robyns, (R.M.L.I.) Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp

NCOs  
Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) Charles Pawsey, Chatham Division, age 29, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) Robert Slugg, Portsmouth Division, age 27, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Corporal (R.M.L.I.) John Heazle, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 1 year service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
                                                                           
Other Ranks
#354 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Ambrose, Chatham Division, age 24, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) James Bates, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#180 Private (R.M.L.I.) Matthew Bird, Chatham Division, age 30, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#475 Private (R.M.L.I.) George Cox, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Bombardier (R.M.A.) Charles Crockett, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 21, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#290 Bombardier (R.M.A.) John Cropp, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 21, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1232 Private (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Daniels, Portsmouth Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1230 Private (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Davies, Portsmouth Division, age 27, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1233 Private (R.M.L.I.) Walter Davis, Portsmouth Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) John Demery, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 25, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#553 Private (R.M.L.I.) William Finnigan, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Foster, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#561 Private (R.M.L.I.) Patrick Foy, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#587 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Green, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#355 Gunner (R.M.A.) Thomas Griffiths, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 26, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) G. Harding, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#61 Private (R.M.L.I.) Henry Helbert, Portsmouth Division, age 28, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Hill, Portsmouth Division, age 27, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#635 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Horn, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Drummer (R.M.L.I.) Joseph William Larkyns (aka Larkins), Portsmouth Division, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Likeman, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) John Maddox, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 27, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Gunner (R.M.A.) E. Marshall, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#717 Private (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Matthews, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Bombardier (R.M.A.) Michael McCartan, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Moyer, age 23, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Acting Bombardier / Gunner (R.M.A.) Frank Parfitt (aka Frank Parfett), Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 26, 8 years service, wounded battle of Gingindlovu, invalided back to Portsmouth, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) George Parfitt (AKA George Parfett), Portsmouth Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#277 Private (R.M.L.I.) Henry Pearse, Portsmouth Division, age 32, 12 years service, one of those who became sick in May, invalided back to Portsmouth, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Stamp, Portsmouth Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#891 Private (R.M.L.I.) William Styles, Portsmouth Division, age 25, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#1878 Private (R.M.L.I.) Frederick George White, Portsmouth Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp


HMS SHAH
Marines who served ashore with the Naval Brigade 7 March 1879 – 21 July 1879

Officers
Captain (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Philips, Chatham Division, age 39, 22 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Captain (R.M.A.) Alexander Leslie Scott Burrowes, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 29, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp

NCOs
#205 Colour-Sergeant (R.M.A.) Kennedy Whittaker, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, Age 34, 18 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp  (Medal is in a private collection)
#106 Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) David Shill, Portsmouth Division, age 28, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Gane, Portsmouth Division, age 38, 19 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#370 Corporal (R.M.L.I.) Adolphus John Henry Banger, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#153 Corporal (R.M.L.I.) George Breakspeare (aka Breakspare), Portsmouth Division, age 31, 21 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#102 Corporal (R.M.A.) Samuel Humm, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 33, 23 years service, South Africa Medal with “1877-8-9” clasp
Corporal (R.M.L.I.) John Williams, Plymouth Division, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp

Other Ranks
#476 Private (R.M.L.I.) John James Alsop (aka Allsop), Chatham Division, age 25, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Job Arnold, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) Herbert Asquith, Portsmouth Division, age 28, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#373 Private (R.M.L.I.) James Bailey, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) Henry Bate, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 35, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Betts, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#388 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Binnie, Portsmouth Division, age 34, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) Thomas Bourton, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 24, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Briant, (aka George Bryant), Portsmouth Division, age 25, 7 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#22 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Briscoe, Portsmouth Division, age 33, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#25 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Byrne, Portsmouth Division, age 34, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Clooney, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#297 Private (R.M.L.I.) George Coombes, Plymouth Division, age 32, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Gunner (R.M.A.) Thomas Cottis, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 35, 16 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) Phillip Crumpton (aka Phillip Crompton), Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 35, 17 years service, died from illness May 1879 at Port Natal, Durban, buried in a Durban cemetery, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Arthur Davis, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Frederick Deacon, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#315 Gunner (R.M.A.) Edward Dolman, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 23, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) George Edward Edgson, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 24, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Robert Elvin, Portsmouth Division, age 24, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#201 Private (R.M.L.I.) Alfred Francis, Portsmouth Division, age 27, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Amos Gibson, Portsmouth Division, age 29, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#214 Private (R.M.L.I.) Charles Grist, Portsmouth Division, age 26, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) George Harvey, Portsmouth Division, age 28, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#191 Private (R.M.L.I.) John Holley, Plymouth, age 33, 13 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Robert Hopcroft, Portsmouth Division, age 44, 21 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Hurley, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#696 Private (R.M.L.I.) James Leonard, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Masding, Chatham Division, age 25, 7 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#257 Private (R.M.L.I.) Henry William Charles Maule, Portsmouth Division, age 31, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John William Millbanks, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#757 Private (R.M.L.I.) David Motley, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#748 Private (R.M.L.I.) James Moger (aka James Moyer), Portsmouth Division, age 23, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Patrick O'Brins, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 4 years service, died from enteric fever on 12 June 1879 at Herwen Hospital, Stanger, buried in Stanger old cemetery, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Luke Payne, Portsmouth Division, age 21, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Payne, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) William Henry Redding, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 29, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Rhodes, Chatham Division, age 23, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#838 Private (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Rich, Portsmouth Division, age 25, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Riley, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#843 Private (R.M.L.I.) Daniel Roberts, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#292 Private (R.M.L.I.) Jonathan Rowlett, Portsmouth Division, age 32, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) George Sampson, Portsmouth Division, age 29, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) George Saunders, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 35, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) George Stevenson, Portsmouth Division, age 30, 11 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
#900 Private (R.M.L.I.) Jonathan Summers, Portsmouth Division, age 23, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Robert Swainston, age 27, 6 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Edward Walker, Portsmouth Division, age 30, 12 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#194 Gunner (R.M.A.) Francis Walker, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 34, 14 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Isaac Walker, Portsmouth Division, age 33, 13 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Walsh (aka Martin Caldwell), South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Edwin Ward, Portsmouth Division, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William Watson, Portsmouth Division, age 26, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1187 Gunner (R.M.A.) George Webster, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 22, 4 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#633 Private (R.M.L.I.) Richard Wheeler, Chatham Division, age 25, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#342 Private (R.M.L.I.) Andrew White, Portsmouth Division, age 26, 8 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Charles Williams, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp(Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) James Wilson, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) James Woodland, Plymouth Division, age 35, 17 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp


HMS TENEDOS
Marines who served ashore with the Naval Brigade from 1 January 1879 – 13 May 1879

Officers
None

NCOs
Colour-Sergeant (R.M.L.I.) John Pardon, Plymouth Division, age 36, 18 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#227 Corporal (R.M.A.) John Armstrong, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 26, 5 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Other Ranks
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Andrews, age 27, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#26 Drummer (R.M.L.I.) Joseph Black, Plymouth Division, age 31, 17 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1066 Private (R.M.L.I.) Charles Brooks, Chatham Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Thomas Chard, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Clapp, Chatham Division, age 19, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) John Davis, age 36, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Gunner (R.M.A.) John Jones, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 28, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) William J. Lumar, Chatham Division, age 20, 2 years service, died from fever 31 January 1879 at Fort Tenedos, buried in Fort Pearson cemetery, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1165 Private (R.M.L.I.) George Monk, Plymouth Division, age 22, 3 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Private (R.M.L.I.) Peter Mooney, age 21, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp (Medal is in a private collection)
Gunner (R.M.A.) Robert Payne, Royal Marine Artillery Barracks, age 36, 18 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
Private (R.M.L.I.) Richard Sandercock, Plymouth Division, age 37, 19 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp
#1061 Private (R.M.L.I.) Frederick White, Chatham Division, age 20, 2 years service, South Africa Medal with “1879” clasp


References:

1.   “Archives of Zululand, Anglo-Zulu War 1879”, Vol. 5, Laband and Knight
2.   “Diary of John Carroll, Gunner, Royal Marine Artillery”
3.   “Fearful Hard Times, The Seige and Relief of Eshowe, 1879” by Ian Castle and Ian Knight”
4.   “Further Correspondence Respecting the Affairs of South Africa” C – 2260), 1879
5.   “Letter written by Colour Sergeant Kennedy Whittaker, R.M.A.”, Burnley Express, 14 June, 1879,
       British Newspaper Archive
6.   “Letter written by Lieutenant Townley Ward Dowding, R.M.L.I.”, The Marlburian, May 28, 1879,
       Marlborough College
7.   “Log book of the 2 Naval brigades landed in Zululand from HMS SHAH, 1879” by Admiral John
       William Brackenbury (BCK/2/A), National Maritime Museum, Greenwich
8.   “Marines in the Zulu War 1879” by J. T. Thompson, “Soldiers of the Queen”, 48, March, 1987
9.   “Medal roll of the Naval Brigade who served in the Basuto and Zulu Wars.” ADM 171/40, National
       Archives
10. “Medical and surgical journal of Her Majesty's Ship Boadicea for 1 January to 31 December 1879”
11. “Narrative of the Field Operation connected with the Zulu War of 1879” Prepared by the
       Intelligence Branch of the War Office
12. “Payments in addition to wages, to be paid to those persons who may be same under
       the Regulations of the Navy.”  “The Navy List corrected to 20th December 1877”
13. “Royal Marines: Registers of Service”, ADM 159, National Archives
14. “Scale of full pay and wages of the Royal Marine” “Queen’s Regulations and Admiralty Instructions
       for the Government of Her Majesty’s Naval Service, 1879”
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1879graves

1879graves

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PostSubject: Re: Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War   Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War EmptyTue Jun 11, 2019 7:25 pm

Hi Tom

Fantastic work there, well done.

Salute

Andy
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90th

90th

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PostSubject: Royal Marines of the Naval Bgde AZW    Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War EmptyWed Jun 12, 2019 1:57 am

I'll second that Andy ! , OUTSTANDING work P.O.T.
90th Salute You need to study mo You need to study mo




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barry

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PostSubject: Royal Marines - Naval Brigade   Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War EmptyWed Jun 12, 2019 6:34 am

Hi Tom,
Thanks for sharing your splendid work on involvement of the Royal Marines in the AZW. . Well done!. The references are tops.
This essay also serves to give credit to the men involved, in this oft overlooked theatre of the AZW but more importantly illustrates how a well planned and coordinated defence at Ginginhlovu with just one Naval Gatling brought to  bear overwhelmed the enemy after a very short time.
The fact that the Zulus could not get in close and bring their stabbing spears to bear must have demoralized them considerably.

regards

barry
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Pick

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Join date : 2010-04-11
Age : 64
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Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War Empty
PostSubject: Re: Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War   Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War EmptyWed Jun 26, 2019 9:00 pm

Superb POST Tom, well done!

cheers,

Pick
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PostSubject: Re: Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War   Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War EmptyWed Jun 26, 2019 9:53 pm

Tom outstanding. Salute
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PostSubject: Re: Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War   Royal Marines of the Naval Brigade for the Zulu War Empty

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