WWW.1879ZULUWAR.COM

Film Zulu Dawn:Lt. Col. Pulleine: His Lordship is of the cetain opinion that it's far too difficult an approach to be chosen by the Zulu command.Col. Durnford: Yes, well... difficulty never deterred a Zulu commander.
 
HomeHome  CalendarCalendar  GalleryGallery  PublicationsPublications  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  
Latest topics
»  Darkest Africa
Yesterday at 8:33 pm by xhosa2000

» Prince Imperial Leave Request at Woolwich
Yesterday at 8:03 pm by martinusmagnus

» Lieutenant-Colonel Gerald Lionel Joseph Goff.
Wed Oct 18, 2017 9:26 pm by 90th

» R.I.P Terry Sole
Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:05 pm by nitro450

» Major Gonville Bromhead VC
Mon Oct 16, 2017 11:46 am by SRB1965

» Lt. G. Pardoe 1st Btn 13th (Somerset) Light Infantry
Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:45 am by ADMIN

» Natal Hussars
Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:02 pm by Rory Reynolds

» Location of grave : Lt. F. Scott Natal Carbineers
Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:49 pm by Tim Needham

» Lieutenant Henry Lysons
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:47 pm by ADMIN

» Lt. H.Valentine Jay. Natal Native Contingent
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:44 pm by ADMIN

» Lieut & Adjutant Henry Julian Dyer
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:41 pm by ADMIN

» Lt Gonville Bromhead
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:19 pm by ADMIN

» MAJOR FRANK BROADWOOD MATTHEWS
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:15 pm by ADMIN

» Lodge Isandlwana Masonic Military Lodge
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:11 pm by Muhlenbeck

» Lt. G. Baker 3rd Btn 60th Regiment
Mon Oct 09, 2017 8:03 pm by ADMIN

Lt. General Sir J.G. Wolseley, General Officer Commanding
Mac and Shad (Isandula Collection)
The Battlefields of Isandlwana and Rorke's Drift
Search
 
 

Display results as :
 
Rechercher Advanced Search
Top posters
90th
 
littlehand
 
Frank Allewell
 
ADMIN
 
Chelmsfordthescapegoat
 
John
 
Mr M. Cooper
 
1879graves
 
impi
 
rusteze
 
Fair Use Notice
Fair use notice. This website may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not been specifically authorised by the copyright owner. We are making such material and images are available in our efforts to advance the understanding of the “Anglo Zulu War of 1879. For educational & recreational purposes. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material, as provided for in UK copyright law. The information is purely for educational and research purposes only. No profit is made from any part of this website. If you hold the copyright on any material on the site, or material refers to you, and you would like it to be removed, please let us know and we will work with you to reach a resolution.
Top posting users this month
90th
 
xhosa2000
 
Frank Allewell
 
SRB1965
 
ADMIN
 
Victorian Dad
 
Brett Hendey
 
rusteze
 
FLYNN
 
aussie inkosi
 
Most active topics
Isandlwana, Last Stands
Pte David Jenkins. 'Forgotten' Survivor of Rorke's Drift Returned to Official Records
Durnford was he capable.5
Durnford was he capable.1
Durnford was he capable. 3
Durnford was he capable.2
Durnford was he capable. 4
The ammunition question
Pte David Jenkins. 'Forgotten' Survivor of Rorke's Drift Returned to Official Records
The missing five hours.

Share | 
 

 Sir Herbert Stewart

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
littlehand

avatar

Posts : 7063
Join date : 2009-04-24
Age : 49
Location : Down South.

PostSubject: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:32 am

Back to top Go down
old historian2

avatar

Posts : 1097
Join date : 2009-01-14
Location : East London

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:12 am

Sir Herbert Stewart KCB (June 30, 1843 – February 16, 1885), eldest son of the Rev. Edward Stewart, was born at
Sparsholt, Hampshire.
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

He was educated at Brighton College and then Winchester College before entering the army in 1863.

After serving in India with his regiment (37th Foot) he returned to England in 1873, having exchanged into the 3rd
Dragoon Guards. In 1877 he entered the staff college and also the Inner Temple. In 1878 he was sent out to South
Africa, served in the Zulu War and against Sikukuni. As chief staff officer under Sir G Pomeroy Colley he was
present at Majuba (February 27, 1881), where he was made prisoner by a Boer patrol and detained until the end of
March.

In August 1882 he was placed on the staff of the cavalry division in Egypt. After Tel-el-Kebir (September 13, 1882)
he headed a brilliant advance upon Cairo, and took possession of the town and citadel. He was three times
mentioned in despatches, and made a brevet-colonel, CB, and aide-de-camp to the queen. In January 1884 he was
sent to Suakin in command of the cavalry under Sir Gerald Graham, and took part as brigadier in the actions from
El Teb to the advance on Tamaneb. His services were recognized by the honour of KCB, and he was assistant
adjutant and QMG in the south-eastern district in England from April to September 1884.

He then joined the expedition for the relief of Khartoum, and in December, when news from Gordon decided Lord
Wolseley to send a column across the desert of Metemma, Stewart was entrusted with the command. On January
16, 1885, he found the enemy in force near the wells of Abu Klea, and brilliantly repulsed their fierce charge on the
following morning. Leaving the wounded under guard, the column moved forward on the 18th through bushy country
towards Metemma, 23 miles off. Meanwhile the enemy continued their attacks, and on the morning of the 19th
Stewart was wounded and obliged to hand over the command to Sir Charles Wilson.

He lingered for nearly a month, living long enough to hear of his promotion to the rank of major-general "for
distinguished service in the field." He died on the way back from Khartoum to Korti on the 16th of February, and
was buried near the wells of Jakdul. In the telegram reporting his death Lord Wolseley summed up his character
and career in the words: "No braver soldier or more brilliant leader of men ever wore the Queen's uniform." A bronze cenotaph was erected in St Paul's Cathedral, London.

Cabinet Photograph
W. & D. Downey - Photographer
57 & 61 Ebury Street, S.W., London, England
c. 1880

Source: www.soldiersofthequeen.com
Back to top Go down
Chelmsfordthescapegoat

avatar

Posts : 2550
Join date : 2009-04-24

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:49 am

Victorian Memorial Fountain for Major General Sir Herbert Stewart KCB (1843-1885)

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Back to top Go down
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 1:01 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 1:05 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]



Memorial to Major General Sir Herbert Stewart
second bay from west, North nave aisle, St Paul's Cathedral, London, England
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 1:14 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 3:29 pm

Description
Three: Private Arthur Wood, 3rd Dragoon Guards, who served as servant to Lieutenant-Colonel (later Major-General Sir) Herbert Stewart in South Africa in 1879, at Tel-el-Kebir in 1882, and afterwards as a private servant to the same officer when in command of the Desert Column and at Abu Klea, shortly after which battle Stewart was mortally wounded

South Africa 1877-79, 1 clasp, 1879 (1251 Pte. A. Wood, 3rd Dragn. Gds.); Egypt and Sudan 1882-89, 3 clasps, Tel-El-Kebir, The Nile 1884-85, Abu Klea (1251 Pte. A. Wood, 3rd D...) last part of naming illegible through edge bruising; Khedive’s Star 1882, edge bruising and pitting from star, otherwise better than good fine (3) £800-1000
Footnote
Private Arthur Wood appears on a two-man roll for the Zulu war medal, with The Hon. Guy Dawnay, ‘a civilian, attached as Intelligence Officer to Major Genl. Marshal’. Wood is noted as ‘Servant to Bt. Lt. Colonel Stewart’ and the roll is marked ‘It is requested that these medals may be forwarded to Lt. Colonel Stewart, 3rd Drag. Gds., Adair House, for transmission’. Stewart was Brigade Major to Major-General F. Marshall, C.M.G., commanding Cavalry Brigade, 2nd Division, throughout the operations of 1879. Stewart and Wood are the only recipients of the Zulu war medal from the 3rd Dragoon Guards.

It seems reasonable to assume that Private Wood remained with Stewart in his appointment as Chief Staff Officer to Sir George Pomeroy Colley during the First Boer War, and more particularly at Majuba Hill when Pomeroy was taken prisoner. Private Wood certainly accompanied Stewart to Egypt, where he had been appointed Assistant Adjutant-General of Cavalry, taking part in the battle of Tel-el-Kebir and the capture of Cairo. Wood is listed with three other Privates of the 3rd Dragoon Guards on a four-man roll for Egypt 1882, he being the only recipient of the clasp for Tel-el-Kebir, the roll signed by Colonel Herbert Stewart.

Private Arthur Wood, who had enlisted at Edinburgh on 20 October 1872, aged 18, transferred to the 4th Dragoon Guards on 31 July 1882, and was discharged at Brighton on 27 January 1883.

Wood accompanied Sir Herbert Stewart in a private capacity in Lord Wolseley’s Gordon Relief Expedition, when Stewart commanded the Desert Column which crossed the Bayuda from Korti to Metemmeh, and repelled the Arab attack at the battle of Abu Klea. Two days later, in action at Al-Qubbat, Stewart was mortally wounded by a bullet in the groin and died at Gakdul on 16 February 1885, the most senior casualty of the campaign. Wood’s name appears on an individual roll for The Nile and Abu Klea where he is recorded as ‘late Civilian Servant to the late Major Genl. Sir H. Stewart’, the address being given as 28 Hans Place, London SW, home of Lady Stewart. Sold with copies of all relevant rolls.

Hammer price £1500 in 2008
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 3:35 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Major-General Sir Herbert Stewart, K.C.B. died on the 16th of February 1885, and was buried at the wells near Jakdul in the Sudan.
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
John

avatar

Posts : 2528
Join date : 2009-04-06
Age : 55
Location : UK

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:35 pm

Has anyone got a photo of his grave. We can insert it in the Graves Section.
Back to top Go down
24th

avatar

Posts : 1838
Join date : 2009-03-25

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:43 pm

Brilliant 1879Graves Can see you been busy.
Back to top Go down
rai



Posts : 171
Join date : 2009-10-16

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 12:43 pm

Hi , I think this area was flooded when the Aswan Dam was built, but i think there was an Illustration of his grave in the Illustrated London News or Graphic at the time??, regards rai klh
Back to top Go down
Dave

avatar

Posts : 1606
Join date : 2009-09-21

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 1:47 pm

Sir Herbert Stewart (1843-1885), majorgeneral; ensign 1863; aide-de-camp to commander of Allahabad division, 1868-70; deputy-assistant quartermaster-general, Bengal, 1872-3, for conduct in cholera outbreak, 1870; entered staff college and Inner Temple, 1877; brigade-major of cavalry during Zulu war, 1879; military secretary to Wolseley and brevet lieutenantcolonel, 1880; as chief staff officer to Sir George Pomeroy Oolley captured at Majuba, 1881; assistant adjutant-general of cavalry in Egypt, 1882; secured Cairo after Tel-el-Kebir; C.B., brevet-colonel, and aide-decamp to Queen Victoria; K.C.B. for services in Suakim campaign, 1884; assistant adjutant and quartermasterKciK-ral, south-eastern district, 1884; in Lord Wolseley's (Jonlon relief expedition, 1884-5, commanded desert column to proceed to Metemmeh; repelled Arab attack at Abu Klea, but three days later was mortally wounded: promoted major-general before death; monuments at St. Paul's, London, and Winchester.
Back to top Go down
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 2:11 pm

I came across the following quote

"The remains of both Gordon and Stewart lie in the Sudan. Stewart succumbed to his wounds on 16 February and was buried near the Jakdul wells, in the Bayuda Desert, where his grave still is."

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
View South over the Bayuda Desert.
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
Mr Greaves

avatar

Posts : 746
Join date : 2009-10-18

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:23 pm

REMINISCENCES OF SIR HERBERT STEWART. BY A BROTHER OFFICER.


"He is the best youngster I ever saw join a regiment,'' was the observation made by a popular officer of some standing in the service, shortly after Herbert Stewart joined the army. That this opinion was well deserved has been proved by the late Sir Herbert's short but brilliant career, the fatal ending of which, all who knew him and served with him do now so deeply deplore. A few reminiscences of his life, by one who had the privilege of I his intimate friendship, may be interesting I at the present time, while his memory is still fresh, and the circumstances amid which he met his death are still so engrossing men's minds. Herbert Stewart was gazetted ensign in the 37th Regiment, now the First Battalion of the Hampshire, in 1863. In the beginning of 1864 he joined at Aldershot,
bringing with him the reputation (not an unimportant one in a good old English regiment) of having been captain of the eleven at
Winchester School. The 37th were devoted to cricket, and the new
Subaltern proved an immense acquisition to the regimental team; he will be long remembered among cricketers as one of the best amateur wicket keepers in England. With his valuable assistance, the
Regimental eleven of the old 37th was for many years hard to beat.

As a youngster, Stewart was never one of those who took pleasure in midnight orgies or practical jokes — amusements sometimes too much in vogue among young officers — but on festive occasions he preferred the whist-table or the billiard room, where he always ranked much above the average player.

At Dover, whence the regiment proceeded from Aldershot, Stewart mainly distinguished himself at cricket and boating. In the regimental six-oar no man pulled a better stroke. He possessed in
great perfection that ready co-operation of hand and eye so essential to success in all manly sports. Some of the older members of the Dover Club must still recollect this skill at billiards — his brilliant winning hazards at pool. This may seem a trifling matter; but Stewart's play indicated that swift judgment, quick decision,
and imperturbable temper which so deseeding on leave to Simla,Stewart was selected by General X as his aide-de- camp. Many officers and civilians who were in Bengal at the time, will recollect him well in that position, and how people were sometimes heard to speak of "Stewart and his general ‘‘! We next find him employed in the quartermaster general's department in the camp of exercise at Delhi; and afterwards in the same capacity at Meean Meer. Whilst there, the
37th arrived, and in about a fortnight lost, by an outbreak of cholera, over one hundred lives. The recognized best plan of
action in such an emergency is to move the stricken regiment (if possible, across a river), and in every way try to keep up the spirits of the men by games, music, etc., — anything, in fact, to prevent the mind from dwelling on the terrible position.

Stewart's character came out strongly during this trying time; and the services of this young deputy assistant quartermaster general were invaluable in planning, superintending, and carrying out the
arrangements necessary for the moves, camps, etc. Indeed, had a less efficient officer been on the staff, the regiment would have fared badly; but thanks to his strength of character and energy, things
were managed, not in the spirit of red tape, but practically and thoroughly. It has been remarked by those who have experienced both situations, that a cholera camp is more trying to the nerves than a
Battlefield.

Having returned to England on leave in 1873, Captain Stewart exchanged into the 3rd Dragoon Guards. Although offered permanent employment on the staff of the quartermaster-general's department in
India, he considered that his future interests lay in another direction. In 1877 Stewart entered the Staff College, creating
rather a sensation by bringing with him a four-in-hand team. While there he was one of the foremost with the College drag hounds, and was well known with Mr. Garth's and the Queen's. After completing the two years' course, being then only a captain of cavalry, and having seen no active service, be volunteered for South Africa.

Stewart afterwards declared that the Zulu campaign was the hardest piece of work he ever did. He was on the eve of embarking for England, almost unnoticed, when Lord Wolseley telegraphed to stop
him, and gave him the appointment of military secretary, in the place of Colonel Colley, who had been ordered to India. Stewart thus got his foot the lowest rung of the ladder, up which he was to rapidly to ascend. In the Secocoeni campaign, which followed, he discharged the very severe and heavy duties required of him with his accustomed energy, thereby receiving the well-merited approval of his chief, and afterwards his brevet of lieutenant colonel — which recognition of services no man better deserved.

We next see Stewart on Majuba Hill with Sir G. Colley, in the spring of 1881. He was close to his chief when that gallant but unfortunate officer was shot dead, and evidently one of the last on that fatal
hill, for he was taken prisoner. He afterwards spent an interesting time with the Boers, who treated him well, giving him the very best they had. Like all who shared in that disastrous fight, Stewart
was unrecompensed for his hard service there.

After the Transvaal campaign he rejoined his regiment, and did duty with it in command of the detachment at Glasgow until early in 1882, when he was offered an aide-decamp ship by Lord Spencer in Ireland. Here the lord-lieutenant found scope for Colonel Stewart's great
abilities in many other than the ordinary duties of an A.D.C., — although for these no man could have been more fitted. His handsome, expressive face and peculiar charm of manner, his active habits and
bold riding, ensured his popularity with the Irish in the hunting-field as in the ball-room, and he was always a favourite in society; but his capacity for higher and more intellectual work was not ignored, at a time when long heads were much required in Ireland. On account of his sound common sense and rare tact, Stewart was specially fitted for diplomatic work of ah important or delicate nature. He writes about this time from the vice regal lodge: " We are very busy over here with one thing and another, and I drop in for all sorts of work — one day I am a policeman, and the next a university
reformer. This style of change suits my usual restlessness." From this time Stewart's raise vitas very rapid. When selected for the brigade major ship of cavalry in the expedition to Egypt in 1882, he was only a major in the 3d Dragoon Guards, and a brevet lieutenant-ant colonel in the army, having served in three campaigns, and several times mentioned in despatches. He was present with General Drury Lowe's cavalry latterly as deputy assistant adjutant general — during all the actions of that campaign, and in the splendid march distinguished his after career — the success of which was predicted by those who knew him well.



Promotion was exceptionally rapid in the 37th Regiment at the time of which I write — many subalterns getting their companies after less than four years* service. Stewart was promoted to lieutenant
In 1865, and selected for the adjutancy in 1866.

From Dover the regiment was sent to Ireland, where it spent a short year in various stations; and officers who were then quartered in that country must still remember Stewart's feats in cricket matches at the Curragh, Cork, and Fermoy.

In July 1866, the headquarters of the 37th, with Stewart as adjutant, embarked at Queenstown in "the good ship Blenheim," bound for Calcutta. Good ship, however, proved a misnomer in this case, as the vessel grounded on the sandbanks at the mouth of the Hooghly, where she narrowly escaped shipwreck, — bumped about during a whole night, and was eventually so damaged that she was afterwards
Condemned, and never went another voyage. An awful night of peril and suspense was passed — necessarily a crucial test of pluck and character, death staring all in the face. The young adjutant on this trying occasion manifested the coolness and courage, which were
afterwards so prominently shown in his career.

On its arrival in India, the regiment was stationed in the Rohilcund district one of the finest in that country for sport. Here it remained four years in different stations — Bareilly, Shahjehanpore, Moradabad. In the immediate neighbourhood is found the best of wild-duck, snipe, and other shooting; while a night's did places one on the skirts of the terat^ the grandest field in the world for shikar.

The 37th was at that time a young and very sporting regiment, and it had the good fortune to be commanded by a colonel who was second to none in the use of the rife and the rod, and the keenest of all in every manly exercise. Under these auspicious circumstances, it is not surprising that the officers made the most of this Elysium of the shikari. Tiger shooting and other sporting parties were frequently organized; and Stewart was one of the most ardent and indefatigable of sportsmen.

Many men, after the novelty of killing their first tiger, find a certain tameness in this form of sport, and Stewart went in with perhaps more zest for the wild life and difficult stalking of the Himalayas and Tibet. In the latter elevated and treeless country the necessary hard work tells severely on the constitution; and only the most robust and enthusiastic of stalkers are likely to meet with success. It showed a good deal of determination and self-reliance for a fresh from England, with little knowledge of the country,
or the language, ways, and manners of the natives, to start alone across these lofty mountain ranges, and make double marches in order to catch up his colonel, who had preceded him eight or ten days. This Stewart accomplished; and the party afterwards crossing the snowy range at the Niti Pass, made a most successful six months' trip to Tibet, returning with many trophies of Ovis ammon^ burrel, etc.
The same party undertook a similar expedition from Cashmere in 1871, when a famous bag was made. These journeys entail very severe exertion, long and difficult marches on foot, and many days must often be passed without a sign of game or the chance of firing a shot.





Promoted to captain in 1868, and procavalry on Cairo after the battle of Tel-el- Kebir. By this rapid march and vigorous pursuit the enemy was prevented from again rallying, the fruits of victory were reaped, Cairo taken, and the campaign practically ended. With the audacity, combined with shrewdness, which should ever be the leading characteristic of the beau sabreur, Stewart, by a clever disposition of his small force, deceived the garrison of Cairo — twenty thousand unbeaten regular troops — and demanded their instant surrender. Had they refused to capitulate, he could not for a moment have opposed the force against him with bestirred-out cavalry. For these services
Stewart was appointed A.D.C. to the queen, made a companion of the Bath, and promoted full colonel.

Last year he v/as again called upon to serve his country: this time in the Soudan, under Sir Gerald Graham, when he had the honour to command the cavalry brigades at the battles of £1-Teb and Tamai.

At each of these engagements the cavalry did effective and gallant service, although that miserable weapon, the regulation sabre, proved its worthlessness, and the troopers eventually armed themselves
with the lances of the dead Arabs. At the fight at Tamai, Stewart, now commanding a cavalry brigade, proved a friend in need to his former chief and sporting ally, General Davis (to whom he had been
adjutant in the old Indian days), by coming to his aid at a most critical moment, when Davis's square was partly broken and temporarily pressed back. Stewart cleverly and boldly dismounted his horsemen, and by their effective fire checked the wild rush of Arab fanatics, and enabled the brigade to rally.

Stewart's last campaign must be too fresh in the minds of every one to need more than a few passing remarks.

Selected at Korti by Lord Wolseley for the command of a most arduous and dangerous enterprise, he hastened across the desert to Gakdul, a distance of nearly one hundred miles, where was the nearest ample water supply. Leaving his men there, he returned almost without rest,
and again directly crossed the dreary waste with another contingent. This march of nearly two hundred miles in less than six days is unparalleled in its character, camels being the only mode of con- veyance for men, water, and supplies. It will rank for rapidity and endurance although a short march with a small force among the greatest historical marches record. Very shortly after, starting from Gakdul, with his whole force now concentrated — about fifteen hundred
fighting men — he again struck across the desert, making for the wells of Abu Klea and the Nile. How he fought two successful battles Abu Klea on the 17thJanuary, and Gubat on the 19th — against overwhelming numbers of the bravest fanatics, where defeat meant annihilation, how he was struck down at the fight on the 19th by a wound which has since proved fatal, — these things are well
Known.

Stewart was not more remarkable for his bravery and intelligence as a soldier, than for his endearing qualities in private life. Those who had the advantage of his friendship recognized in him strength of mind and geniality of temper, which made his companionship a real pleasure and privilege. He was often and very aptly spoken of as ** a long-headed man,’ and he possessed in a remarkable degree the power of writing a good letter — of expressing himself clearly and concisely.
Ever ready to help a friend in the hour of need, it was a common practice to resort to him for advice in matters of difficulty
or delicacy, which was always given kindly and electively. In that lamentable affair in connection with the death of the prince imperial, when Captain Carey was tried by court-martial, Stewart, who had been with him at the Staff College, assisted the prisoner with advice, suggested his line of defence, and helped him in his trouble.
It cannot be supposed that this was done from any sympathy with Carey's conduct, but from a chivalrous impulse, which led him to stand by a fallen comrade who was helpless and friendless. In his rapid rise in his profession Stewart owed nothing to private interest. It was in the ordinary course of soldiering that he first met Lord Wolseley at Rorke's Drift, who, no doubt with that penetration for which he is remarkable, recognized in him a most capable officer, not to be lost sight of in future campaigns.

It was not only on the field of battle, in all manly sports, and in private life, that Stewart was ever prominent. He became, while at the Staff College, a member of the Honourable Society of the Inner
Temple, and of late years, between his campaigns, was often to be met during the law terms eating his dinners at the Inner Temple Hall. He had finished keeping his terms, but had not been called to the bar, when he quitted England for the last time.

Reference taken from ( The Living Age )

G.
Back to top Go down
1879graves

avatar

Posts : 2443
Join date : 2009-03-03
Location : Devon

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:30 pm

Hi Mr Greaves

Firstly welcome to the forum and nice to see you posting.

Thanks for the above article, it is packed full of information, Great :)
Back to top Go down
http://zuluwar1879.tribalpages.com
Saul David 1879



Posts : 529
Join date : 2009-02-28

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 5:41 pm

1885 Sir Herbert Stewart's Column Leaving Korti
Rare & Authentic 124 year old THE GRAPHIC News Engraving! 137

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Back to top Go down
ADMIN

avatar

Posts : 3586
Join date : 2008-11-01
Age : 58
Location : KENT

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Sun Oct 18, 2009 6:26 pm

Nice Print S.D
Back to top Go down
http://www.1879zuluwar.com
90th

avatar

Posts : 9300
Join date : 2009-04-07
Age : 61
Location : Melbourne, Australia

PostSubject: Herbert Stewart print.   Mon Oct 19, 2009 1:52 pm

Back to top Go down
littlehand

avatar

Posts : 7063
Join date : 2009-04-24
Age : 49
Location : Down South.

PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:13 pm

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Sir Herbert Stewart   

Back to top Go down
 
Sir Herbert Stewart
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
WWW.1879ZULUWAR.COM  :: THE ONE'S THE HISTORY BOOKS FORGOT-
Jump to: