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 SANSOMS HORSE

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littlehand

littlehand

Posts : 7086
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PostSubject: SANSOMS HORSE   SANSOMS HORSE EmptySun Nov 29, 2009 12:22 pm

Just a quick question. Was there a colonial unit named (SANSOMS HORSE) during the Zulu war.
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1879graves

1879graves

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PostSubject: Re: SANSOMS HORSE   SANSOMS HORSE EmptySun Nov 29, 2009 12:33 pm

Sansom’s Horse

by DR. F. K. MITCHELL, JCD,
Fellow of the S.A. Numismatic Society


Nothing in the whole field of South African military medal collecting is more fun than tracking down the story of the units whose titles one finds engraved on the medal’s rim. This is especially true of our earlier campaign medals, which often provide almost the only tangible evidence that some tiny unit ever existed at all.

In a quarter of a century of medal collecting I have been particularly fascinated by the medal for SOUTH AFRICA 1877-79. This medal was given for service in the Gaika-Gcaleka War, the Northern Border War, at Morosi’s Mountain in Basutoland, against Sekukuni, or in the Zulu War of 1879. More than 200 different South African volunteer units qualified for it. The very names of some of these units breathe romance, and conjure up mental pictures of hardy pioneers on our frontiers, men in the main of British stock, who lived no less by the horse and the gun than did their Boer neighbours to the north. Look at the names of some of these units:
Adelaide Volunteer Cavalry; Barkly Rangers; Berlin Volunteers; Bettington’s Horse; Colesberg Light Horse; Murray’s Orange Rovers; Natal Hussars; Kingwilliamstown Veteran Volunteers; One Star Diamond Contingent; Sidbury Mounted Rangers; Stutterheim Light Infantry Volunteers; Southey’s Rangers; Bowker’s Rovers; Stevenson’s Horse; Lydenberg Rifles; New England Contingent; Wodehouse True Blues.
Do you blame me for being fascinated?

One of the many gaps in my knowledge was happily filled by Major Justin Hulme, who told us the story, in the December 1972 issue of this Journal (Vol. 2. No. 4. The Editor’s Letter-Box) of ‘Carbutt’s Border Rangers’. I have the medal awarded to Trooper H. Brunner of that unit. Like Capt Carbutt’s, this medal has no bar, so I know that Brunner was mobilised in Natal during the Zulu War of 1879, but that he did not cross the Tugela into Zululand. (If he had, he would have qualified for the “1879” bar).

Another unit of which details have eluded me over the years, has been Sansom’s Horse. Now I have never actually seen a medal named to Sansom’s Horse, but I have been on the look-out for one, because Tylden in his ‘The Armed Forces of South Africa’ lists it. His entry is brief in the extreme:
‘465 SANSOM’S HORSE. A small Kingwilliamstown unit, served in the Ninth Kaflir War (Medal Roll).’

For years I have had the unanswered question in my mind. Who was Sansom, of Sansom’s Horse? Was a medal ever issued to Sansorn’s Horse? Some months ago, an unusually determined and personable young man talked his way past my secretary and into my office, without an appointment, on a particularly busy morning. We talked briefly and to the point, about the business of the firm he represented. Then, as I stood up to usher him out, the penny dropped! ‘Did you say’ I asked, ‘that your name is Sansom?’ ‘That’s right, Doctor, Brian Sansom’. ‘An unusual name’, I said ‘are you perhaps a descendant of Sansom, of Sansom’s Horse?’ ‘I am indeed. He was my great-grandfather! We have a beautiful clock at home given to him after the Battle of the Springs’. Need I say that I found time to talk to him a little longer?

Following this chance contact, I subsequently met Brian’s father, Mr Doug Sansom, of Komgha. With the help of his friend, the late Dr A. W. Burton, the well-known Border historian, Doug Sansom had delved into the history of his forebears. This is their story as he has told it to me:

George Sansom and his wife, Dorothy, were 1820 settlers. They were members of Calton’s party from Nottinghamshire, which settled originally near Bathurst. Their son James was born in 1828 and, as a young man, saw service in the Frontier wars of 1846 and 185 1-53. After the former war it was decided to settle the area which became known as British Kaffraria, between the Keiskamma and the Kei Rivers, and James Sansom, in common with many of the young men who had rallied to the colours, was rewarded by the grant of a farm in the new territory. He thus became the owner of the farm Hopewell, on the Tyityaba River, nine miles from the present town of Komgha.

A condition attaching to the grant of these farms and actually written into the title deeds of Hopewell when ownership was registered in 1864 was that all able-bodied men were required to hold themselves in readiness to defend the nearby Frontier in the event of war.

James Sansom evidently accepted the responsibility of leadership in this matter, and formed his own volunteer detachment which became known as Sansom’s Horse and met once a month for target practice. In due course his son, Edward Floyd Sansom, was enrolled as a private in his father’s unit.

In September 1877 fighting erupted on the frontier the Gaika-Gcaleka or Ninth Kaffir War. The Cape Colonial Government, which had formally incorporated British Kaffraria as part of the Colony in 1866, sent detachments of the Frontier Armed and Mounted Police, and of certain Colonial volunteer units, into the southern part of the Transkei, but no imperial troops were permitted to cross the Great Kei river.

On the 9th of October, 1877, a force consisting mainly of Sansom’s Horse was encamped at Springs, about six miles on the Transkei side of the Great Kei, south-east of the present Kei Bridge. Early that morning, while most of the men were still asleep, the camp was heavily attacked by a large force of Gcalekas. Captain Sansom ordered his men to stand fast, and immediately sent a despatch rider for reinforcements. Some of the young recruits were close to panic, but Sansom rallied them — he in fact threatened to shoot the first man to put his foot in a stirrup! and coolly set about arranging the defence of the camp. The battle continued until after midday, but by the time reinforcements arrived the Gcalekas had withdrawn, leaving many dead behind them. Sansom’s Horse had two men wounded.

Subsequently the Cape Colonial forces under Commandant C. D. Griffith drove Kreli and the Gcalekas over the Bashee River into Bomvanaland. The Cape Government thereupon came to the mistaken conclusion that the war was over, and all the volunteers including Sansom’s Horse— were allowed to return to their homes before Christmas 1877.

According to the late Dr Burton, ‘The Kaffrarian Watchman’ (Kingwilliamstown), of about April 17th 1878, contained the following report:

“PRESENTATION TO COMMANDANT J. H. SANSOM:

“The gift and an address were presented by Commandant Charles Duncan Griffith CMG. Battle of the Springs and Manzana Heights when Commandant Sansom was in command of ‘Sansom Horse’ as a separate corps in the field. ‘The handsome clock set was presented by ‘OUR Boys’ in admiration of his conduct, display of cool bravery and skilful leadership. ‘He was assisted in this battle by Commandant George Gray whose father was killed by rebel Hottentots in the war of 1850/53.’

The presentation consisted of an ornate and handsome clock, with matching side ornaments, in gilt and blue enamel. The clock itself bears a silver plate on which is the inscription:

‘Presented to Capt James Sansom
by Our Boys
In admiration of his conduct while serving
in the field. November 1877’

On one side the ornament is inscribed ‘SPRINGS’, and on the other ‘OCTOBER 1877’.

This was an interesting story, but my original question was still unanswered. Was a medal ever issued bearing on its rim the name “SANSOM’s HORSE”? So I asked the obvious question: ‘Where is Capt James Sansom’s medal?’ Doug Sansom told me he had never seen it but, following my enquiry, he found his own father’s medal — awarded to ‘CORPL. E. L. SANSOM’, son ofJames, who had served in the unit commanded by his father. It is the South African Medal, 1877-79, with bar ‘1877-8’, but the unit shown on the rim is ‘KAFFRARIAN VOLS.’ With it is an ornate cross-shaped silver medallion, no doubt a shooting prize, bearing on the obverse the arms of British Kaffraria, and beautifully engraved on the plain reverse ‘PRIVATE E. F. SANSOM, Komgha Troop, K.V., 1875.’

Did these two medals hold the clue? I went back to Tylden’s ‘The Armed Forces of South Africa’ and under No. 252, as corrected by his ‘Further Addenda and Corrigenda’, found the following:

‘252. Kaffrarian Rifle Volunteers, but described in the Comdt-Gen’s Papers (D.D. 1/9) as the Kaffrarian Volunteers. Apparently not gazetted until 1871. This important unit consisted of two weak companies of infantry raised at Kingwilliamstown and of three mounted troops raised respectively at Komgha, Gonubie and Maclean. The corps did garrison duty in the Zulu War after serving in the 9th Kaffir War. In 1878 besides the Commanding Officer, Comdt Lonsdale, there was a Capt, a Lt and a Second Lt to each of the two companies and three troops.’

Suspicion that Sansom’s Horse was in fact the Komgha Troop of the Kaffrarian Volunteers grew to near certainty, when Mr Doug Sansom showed me an old photograph of 13 men in uniform, identified in a document signed by the late Dr Burton, as officers of sections of the Kaffrarian Volunteers. Here was Capt Sansom himself, together with Capt James Faunce Lonsdale formerly of the Inniskilling Fusiliers, the officer commanding and 11 other Captains of the Artillery, Infantry and Mounted sections.

The accompanying photograph, with identification and personal details supplied by Dr Burton, provides not only an interesting portrait gallery of a number of men whose names are written large in Border history, but gives us a vivid impression of the uniforms they wore almost a century ago.

My search must go on. It is a fair assumption that Sansom’s Horse and the Komgha Troop of the Kaffrarian Volunteers were one and the same unit. But even if they were, it is by no means impossible that the medals given to some members of the unit were actually named to ‘SANSOM’S HORSE’, and I must try to find one. In the meantime I am delighted to have hanging, side by side in my wall-cabinet, the South Africa Medal bar 1877-8, and the silver cross for shooting, awarded to Corpl Edward Floyd Sansom, of the Komgha Troop, Kaffrarian Volunteers.
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littlehand

littlehand

Posts : 7086
Join date : 2009-04-24
Age : 52
Location : Down South.

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PostSubject: Re: SANSOMS HORSE   SANSOMS HORSE EmptySun Nov 29, 2009 12:41 pm

Quote :
My search must go on. It is a fair assumption that Sansom’s Horse and the Komgha Troop of the Kaffrarian Volunteers were one and the same unit. But even if they were, it is by no means impossible that the medals given to some members of the unit were actually named to ‘SANSOM’S HORSE’, and I must try to find one. In the meantime I am delighted to have hanging, side by side in my wall-cabinet, the South Africa Medal bar 1877-8, and the silver cross for shooting, awarded to Corpl Edward Floyd Sansom, of the Komgha Troop, Kaffrarian Volunteers.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

A spectacular and unique Victoria/Edward VII/Geoge V era cavalryman's medal group.
Zulu Medal with clasp "1877-8" correctly engraved PTE S YOUNG SANSOMS HORSE


Cape of Good Hope GSM "TRANSKEI" (1070 awarded and 11 to his unit) correctly engraved GUNr S J YOUNG KING W'TOWN VOL ARTY (rim additionally engraved

"1880-81") (unit was King Williamstown Vol Artillery)

QSA "Cape Colony" impressed 563 PTE S J YOUNG FRONTIER LT HORSE (he was also in the District Mounted Rifles in the Boer War)

1911 Coronation Medal engraved 3108 - SGT S J YOUNG - KAFF RIFLES
Colonial Aux Forces LSGC Medal engraved L SER S J YOUNG KAFF RFLS

1879Grave lets hope your chap see this.
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90th

90th

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Age : 64
Location : Melbourne, Australia

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PostSubject: ansom"s horse.   SANSOMS HORSE EmptySun Nov 29, 2009 1:20 pm

hi 1879graves / littlehand.
In response to your posting I can tell you that in the medal roll of the south african war 1877-78-79.
by D.R.FORSYTHE . There was 76 medals issued to that unit of which 21 medals and clasps were
returned to Woolwich mint . 75 medals 1877-78 clasp , 1 1878 clasp.
There was a medal on ebay for PRIVATE .H. TOWNSEND . SANSOME"S HORSE. CLASP 1877-78.
on 29/10/08 closed 8 / 11 / 08. Opening price was 299.99 quid , closed at 471.00 quid. with 343
hits on the site and their were 7 bids on the medal.
cheers 90th.
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Saul David 1879



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Join date : 2009-02-28

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PostSubject: Re: SANSOMS HORSE   SANSOMS HORSE EmptyMon Nov 30, 2009 8:28 pm

‘Sansom’s Horse’ by Dr F. K. Mitchell, JCD. In response to Dr Frank Mitchell’s fine article ‘Sansom’s Horse’ I am in a position to assure him that the South African Medal, 1877-79 named to ‘Sansom’s Horse’ does exist. I fortunately have one of these medals in a rather interesting family group that might be worth recording in this journal. Firstly, let me describe a pair. They are, ‘South Africa, 1834-53 W. STEPHENSON. 6TH REGT’, and ‘South Africa 1877-79 Bar “1877-8” SERGT. W. STEVENSON KG. WM. TN. VETN. VOLS’. I have been able to verify both medals at the Public Records Office in London. The 1834-53 Medal was checked in the roll for Kaffir Wars (W.O. 100/17) on page 257 which lists ‘2629 WM Stephenson 6th foot’ as having served during the 1846-7 campaign. A later entry in the same volume (page 269) indicates that he was ‘Discharged in 1848 and settled in the Cape’, his medal being sent to Lt Gen Sir Jas. Jackson KCB, Cape of Good Hope, for delivery. The 1877-9 medal is verified on the South African Medal Returns 1877: Vol. 4, Colonial Corps. (W.O. 100/49). The entry is on page 94 and indicates that Sergeant Stevenson, William, had no previous medals and that he served against the ‘Gaikas, Gaelekas and other Kafir tribes’. One also learns from W.O. 100/49 that the Kingwilliamstown Veteran Volunteers was 29 strong, 2 officers and 27 men. The statement ‘no previous medals’ and the different spelling of the surname seem to indicate that this is not a pair but, mainly because of where I obtained the medals and the accompanying trio, I am satisfied that W. Stephenson and W. Stevenson are one and the same person.

The second group I would like to describe is the following trio, ‘South Africa 1877-79 Bar “1877-8” PTE J. STEVENSON. SANSOM’S HORSE’, ‘Cape General Service Bar “TRANSKEI” LT J. E. STEVENSON. MACLEAR NAT. LEV’, and ‘QSA Bars “CAPE COLONY, TRANSVAAL, WITTEBERGEN” Q.M. SJT. J. STEVENSON. BORDER HORSE’. The 1877-79 medal with bar ‘1877-8’ to SANSOM’S HORSE was also verified in the South Africa Medal Returns 1877 : Vol. 4, Colonial Corps. (W.O. 100/49). On page 71 is entered information stating that John Stevenson, Pte, had no previous medals and served against the ‘Gaikas, Gaelekas and other Kafir Tribes’. There were 75 members of this unit who were entitled to the medal, 21 medals were not claimed and later returned to Woolwich, therefore there should be 54 medals (3 officers and 51 men) in existence. Whether or not all the medals are named to SANSOM’S HORSE I would not know, but it would seem to be a fair assumption that this is the case. The Cape General Service Bar ‘TRANSKEI’ is interesting as, according to the roll, this is the only medal to the MACLEAR NATIVE LEVY. Unfortunately, the QSA of this trio has not as yet been verified but in appearance is perfectly genuine. Further research is necessary to establish whether W. Stephenson and W. Stevenson are the same person and what his relationship is to J. Stevenson. An interesting assignment which will need more luck and perseverance than skill to be successful. By establishing that there is at least one South Africa Medal 1877-79 (maybe up to 54 in all) named to SANSOM’S HORSE Dr Mitchell now knows that the haystack he is searching definitely contains the sought-after needle.
M. A. Raaf

Source: Military History Journal - Vol 3 No 1
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littlehand

littlehand

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PostSubject: Re: SANSOMS HORSE   SANSOMS HORSE EmptyMon Nov 30, 2009 8:45 pm

Thanks very much for your replies. Wink

I have been looking for information on Samson's Horse, not a great deal on the net. But I did come across this. Captain Wardell is mentioned.

Extract from "Kafirland: a ten months' campaign"

We left Komgha about sunrise on the 8th of January, with a very strong column, consisting of part of the 88th, some mounted
volunteers called " Sansom's Horse,'some F.A.M.P. and our own corps. We were too strong for the Kafirs to venture to attack
us, and we reached Fort Warwick without anything exciting taking place. For some part of the way, where the road was through bushy country, the Fingoes extended on each side and preceded the column, but no Kafirs were to be seen except in the distance. We found the fort a very snug little place, very well built, with huts and tents inside. As far as its strength was concerned, it would have required a very strong body of Kafirs indeed to have taken it. It had only been attacked once, and that was at night; and then the attack had only been made from a distance, and no harm was done. They were very glad to see us, and we had a merry evening in the mess-hut, inside the fort. Captain Wardell was in command there. Poor fellow ! How little I thought when I said good-bye to him the other day that it
was for the last time ; or that such a slaughter as Isandlana would rob me of so many friends by one such awful blow !

Anyone know what fort Wardell was in command of.
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Mr Greaves

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PostSubject: Re: SANSOMS HORSE   SANSOMS HORSE EmptyMon Nov 30, 2009 8:58 pm

Littlehand you and me both. There not a great deal out there. Thanks for your last posting. Here's one I found but not the Zulu War, but involves Samson's Horse.

History of the Cape Colony. l878

under Colonel Lambert was not cooperating with that under Commandant Frost, having received its instructions from General Cunynghame, while the latter had received his from the honourable Mr. Merriman, a member of the ministry. It consisted of one hundred and twenty two soldiers of the eighty-eighth regiment, fifty-eight men of Sansom's horse, four sailors and five artillerymen with two seven-pounders, and a large number of Fingos. On the 14th of January it left Kcmgha, and in the afternoon of the 16th completed its task, having captured in round numbers twelve thousand head of horned cattle and eight thousand sheep and goats, and having killed at least sixty of the rebels, with a loss to itself of only one Fingo killed and three wounded. While the valley was being scoured, its exit on the side of the Kei was guarded by a body of troops under Colonel Glynn, and at its western extremity Commandant Edward Yewd Brabant with the East London volunteers kept watch, so that escape was cut off in both directions.

The next operation of any importance was an expedition sent against Gongubela by the ministry, and was conducted by Mr. John Hemming, civil commissioner of Queenstown. It consisted of three hundred and seventy- three European and thirty-eight coloured volunteers, that
marched from Queenstown on the 22nd of January. At the Bolotwa it was reinforced by fifty special constables and two hundred blacks, but on nearing its destination that number was found insufficient, for it was ascertained that some Hottentots and many of Anta's Gaikas, who
had been regarded as loyal, were with Gongubela. On the 24th a sharp engagement took place on the bank of the Kei, when, after his ammunition was nearly all expended, Mr. Hemming was obliged to retire. His camp was then attacked by a body of Tembus under Umfanta, a brother of Gangelizwe, but who was at feud with that chief. The attack was made so suddenly and unexpectedly that fifty horses were captured and driven off before any resistance could be made, but the Tembus who were retiring with their booty were followed up, and forty-two of thern were shot, though the horses were not recovered. Thereafter Umfanta and his clan were among the active opponents of the colony.

Source:"History of South Africa from 1795 to 1846"
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